Galaxy Goof-Ups

Galaxy Goof-Ups (also known as Yogi's Galaxy Goofs-Ups) is a 30-minute American animated television series, a spin-off of Yogi's Space Race and the fourth incarnation of the Yogi Bear franchise.[1] The show was produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions and broadcast on NBC from September 9, 1978, to September 1, 1979.[2]

Galaxy Goof-Ups
Galaxy Goof-Ups.JPG
Genre
Directed byRay Patterson
Carl Urbano
Voices ofDaws Butler
Joe Besser
Mel Blanc
John Stephenson
Theme music composerHoyt Curtin
Country of originUnited States
Original languageEnglish
No. of episodes13
Production
Executive producersWilliam Hanna
Joseph Barbera
ProducerArt Scott
Running time30 minutes
Production companyHanna-Barbera Productions
DistributorTaft Broadcasting
Release
Original networkNBC
Audio formatMono
Original releaseSeptember 9, 1978 (1978-09-09) –
September 1, 1979 (1979-09-01)
Chronology
Preceded byYogi's Space Race
Followed byYogi's Treasure Hunt

The Galaxy Guardians—a.k.a. the "Galaxy Goof-ups"—consisted of Yogi Bear, Huckleberry Hound, Quack-Up and Scare Bear as space patrolmen under the leadership of Captain Snerdley; the four of them always goofed up while on duty, and spent most of their time in disco clubs. Despite their constant bumbling, however, they always emerged victorious.

The show originally aired as a segment on Yogi's Space Race from September 9 to October 28, 1978, and was the most popular segment on that show.[3] Following the cancellation of Yogi's Space Race, Galaxy Goof-Ups was given its own half-hour timeslot on NBC beginning November 4, 1978. The show has been rebroadcast on USA Cartoon Express, Nickelodeon, TNT, Cartoon Network and Boomerang.

Quack-Up has a cameo appearance in Jellystone!

CharactersEdit

The "Galaxy Goof-Ups" characters (Yogi Bear, Scare Bear, Huckleberry Hound and Quack-Up) are all from Space Race, except for the following two new characters who are exclusive to this series:

Captain Snerdley: The Commander of the Galaxy Goof-Ups, Captain Snerdley is forced to put up with their clumsiness since they somehow solve the cases that they are assigned to. In "The Dopey Defenders", to make sure the new equipment will work better, he had installed a mechanism which keeps them from touching it.

General Bullhorn: Bullhorn is Snerdley's superior. He is unaware of the Goof-Ups' incompetence and blames Snerdley for whatever goes wrong. In one episode he is seen removing medals (along with pieces of uniform) from Snerdley every time they commit a blunder.

VoicesEdit

Additional voicesEdit

EpisodesEdit

Title Air date PC
1"The Purloined Princess"September 9, 1978 (1978-09-09)101
Princess Glama of the planet Camelotta is kidnapped by Zangra and her robot henchman Drako, who use her as bait to trap the Goof-ups; however, the heroes prove to be so incompetent that the villains have to help them get into the trap. Once inside, the Goof-ups' bungling enables them to rescue the princess and escape.
2"Defective Protectives"September 16, 1978 (1978-09-16)103
General Blowhard is carrying secret plans to prevent the Space Spider's plot to take over the universe. The General needs a good night's sleep before the next day's high-level meeting, so the Goof-ups have to capture the Space Spider and protect the General without waking him up.
3"Whose Zoo?"September 23, 1978 (1978-09-23)102
Sagar the hunter, with the aid of his lackey Grog, has been capturing "lower life-forms" for an interplanetary zoo, and he plans to add the Galaxy Goof-ups—the lowest life-forms he's ever seen—to his collection. After being lured into Sagar's trap, the heroes and Captain Snerdley try to escape, accidentally releasing all the other animals in the process.
4"The Space Pirates"September 30, 1978 (1978-09-30)105
The Goof-ups are assigned to deliver a shipment of gold bullion from the Galaxy Bank to the Galaxy Mint, but they're tricked into handing it all to Captain Sly and his space pirates, so they have to get it back.
5"The Clone Ranger"October 7, 1978 (1978-10-07)104
Tacky Cat is seeking revenge against Captain Snerdley for kicking him out of the service. To this end, he steals a cloning machine from Command Central, and kidnaps Snerdley because no one else knows how to operate it.
6"The Dopey Defenders"October 14, 1978 (1978-10-14)106
Command Central receives a shipment of the latest top-secret equipment. Zangra, disguised as interviewer Barbie Wally (a take-off of Barbara Walters), tricks the Goof-ups into loading all the equipment onto her ship. However, they accidentally take off in her ship, so Zangra and Drako go after them in the Goof-ups' ship.
7"Tacky Cat Strikes Again"October 21, 1978 (1978-10-21)108
Tacky Cat—under orders from his wife Perfecta, who hates the tacky way they live—takes over the planet Camelotta and imprisons Princess Glama. The Goof-ups arrive to free the princess, and Perfecta's constant nagging drives Tacky Cat to surrender to them. In the end, however, Glama comes up with a solution to the Cats' marital discord: she has their planet made half-pristine and half-tacky, so they can both be happy.
8"Space Station USA"October 28, 1978 (1978-10-28)107
The vessel Space Station USA, which had been missing for centuries, is found floating in space; Captain Snerdley orders the Goof-ups to pilot the station to the Galaxonian Museum. The richest man in the galaxy, however, wants to add the vessel to his own collection (which appears to include the Starship Enterprise), so he uses disguises and trickery to steal it from the Goof-ups.
During this episode, the Goof-ups encounter four female versions of themselves, and accompany them to the disco.
9"Hail, King Yogi!"November 4, 1978 (1978-11-04)109
A jungle-covered planet has drifted into Command Central's galaxy, and the Goof-ups are sent to investigate it. The primitive natives are so impressed with Yogi's "magic"—i.e., his hand-held teleportation device—that the tribe's queen makes him their new witch doctor, and he and his crewmates live a life of luxury. However, when Yogi realizes that the queen intends to marry him, he and his friends desperately try to escape from the planet.
In this episode, the Goof-ups don't go to a disco; instead, they dance to music from a radio while on the jungle planet.
10"Dyno-Mite!"November 11, 1978 (1978-11-11)110
Dyno-Mite, a tiny space villain, causes chaos when he steals a new weapon, the Stretch-Shrink Ray.
11"Vampire of Space"November 18, 1978 (1978-11-18)111
The vampire Count Vampula plans to take over the universe with his army of zombies. The first step in his plan is to put the bite on Captain Snerdley, turning him into the Count's vampire slave, so that the Galaxy Goof-ups will be lured into a trap and turned into vampires as well.
12"The Treasure of Congo-Bongo"November 25, 1978 (1978-11-25)112
Rupert and Dimitri (spoofs of Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre) deliberately cause a remote-controlled ship to crash down on the jungle planet Congo-Bongo; this ship carries the treasure-matic computer, which can produce precious metals and gems. The villains then race the Goof-ups through the perils of the jungle to get the computer.
13"Captain Snerdley Goes Bananas"December 2, 1978 (1978-12-02)113
The General sends Captain Snerdley to the Galaxy Sanitarium for his overworked nerves; visits from the Goof-Ups make his condition even worse. Meanwhile, the reptilian Lozar from the planet Lizardia uses the body of head psychiatrist Dr. Wacceau as a disguise, so he can study Snerdley's mind and body; once the study is complete, the Lizardian invasion will begin.

Production creditsEdit

  • Executive Producers: Joseph Barbera and William Hanna Joe Ruby and Ken Spears
  • Producer: Art Scott
  • Directors: Ray Patterson, Carl Urbano
  • Creative Producer: Iwao Takamoto
  • Story Editor: Ray Parker
  • Story: Haskell Barkin, Chuck Couch, Mark Fink, Ray Parker, Jim Ryan
  • Story Direction: John Bruno, Ron Campbell, Carl Fallberg, Jan Green, Michael O'Connor, Don Sheppard, Paul Sommer, Tom Yakutis
  • Recording Director: Art Scott
  • Voices: Roger Behr, Joe Besser, Mel Blanc, Daws Butler, Ted Cassidy, B.J. Cling, Henry Corden, Joan Gerber, Marcy Goldman, Bob Hastings, Jim MacGeorge, Ginny McSwain, Don Messick, Marilyn Schreffler, John Stephenson, Alexis Tramunti, Janet Waldo, Lennie Weinrib, Frank Welker
  • Graphics: Iraj Paran, Tom Wogatzke
  • Title Design: Bill Perez
  • Musical Director: Hoyt Curtin
  • Musical Supervisor: Paul DeKorte
  • Character Design: Willie Ito
  • Layout Supervisors: Bill Hutten, Tony Love
  • Layout: Dale Barnhart, Barry Bunce, Fred Crippen, Rene Garcia, George Goode, Dave Hanan, Sylvia Mattinson, Floyd Norman
  • Song Sequences: Directed by Ken Mundie & Animated by Marija Dail
  • Animation Supervisors: Bill Hutten, Tony Love
  • Animation: Bob Alvarez, Cosmo Anzilotti, Bob Carr, Walt Kubiak, Ed Love, Jim Simon
  • Background Supervisor: Al Gmuer
  • Backgrounds: Deborah Akers, Dario Campanile, Marsha Hanes, James Hickey, Richard Khim, Fernando Montealgere, Andy Phillipson, Michael Reinman, Jeff Riche, Sera Segal-Alsberg, Stephen Thompson, Dennis Venizelos
  • Animation Checking Supervisor: Rollie Greenwood
  • Xerography: Yolanda Vallas
  • Ink and Paint Supervisor: Shannon Bryant
  • Sound Direction: Richard Olson, Bill Getty
  • Camera: Robert Cohen, John Cunningham, Danny Larsen, Joe Ponticello
  • Supervising Film Editor: Larry C. Cowan
  • Dubbing Supervisor: Pat Foley
  • Music Editor: Warner Leighton
  • Effects Editors: Scott Hecker, Robert A. Rutledge
  • Show Editor: Gil Iverson
  • Negative Consultant: William E. DeBoer
  • Production Supervisor: Peter Aries
  • Production Manager: Jayne Barbera
  • Post Production Supervisor: Joed Eaton

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Erickson, Hal (2005). Television Cartoon Shows: An Illustrated Encyclopedia, 1949 Through 2003 (2nd ed.). McFarland & Co. p. 934. ISBN 978-1476665993.
  2. ^ Woolery, George W. (1983). Children's Television: The First Thirty-Five Years, 1946-1981. Scarecrow Press. pp. 116-117. ISBN 0-8108-1557-5. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  3. ^ Sennett, Ted (1989). The Art of Hanna-Barbera: Fifty Years of Creativity. Studio. p. 67. ISBN 978-0670829781. Retrieved 2 June 2020.

External linksEdit