Esti Hírlap

Esti Hírlap (meaning Evening News in English) was a tabloid evening newspaper published in Hungary between 1956 and 1996.

Esti Hírlap
TypeEvening newspaper
FormatTabloid
Founded1956
LanguageHungarian
Ceased publication1996
HeadquartersBudapest
OCLC number25621774

History and profileEdit

Esti Hírlap was first published on 24 December 1956[1] which was a Communist evening paper.[2] Its start was a reflection of the political consolidation in Hungary.[3] The paper was the successor of Esti Budapest, another evening paper,[1] and was based in Budapest.[4] Until the end of the communist regime in Hungary the paper was under the control of the Hungarian Communist Party.[5] During this period it covered significant events which were regarded as appropriate for the people by the Communist authorities.[2][3] In fact, it was populist[6] and featured short human interest articles.[3]

British media company Mirror Group owned 40% of Esti Hírlap in October 1990.[5][7] The other owners were the Hungarian News Publishing Company with the same share and the paper's editorial board with a 20% share.[5] However, due to lower circulation levels the Mirror Group sold its share in 1992, and the paper was closed down in 1996.[2]

CirculationEdit

In 1987 Esti Hírlap had a circulation of 200,000 copies.[2] The circulation of the paper was 130,000 copies in January 1989 and 93,000 copies in January 1991.[8] The paper had a circulation of 70,000 copies in July 1992 and 60,000 copies in March 1993.[8]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b R. G. Carlton (1965). "Newspapers from East Central and Southeastern Europe" (PDF). Washington, DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved 26 December 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d Colin Sparks; John Tulloch (2000). Tabloid Tales: Global Debates Over Media Standards. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 112, 117, 126. ISBN 978-0-8476-9572-0.
  3. ^ a b c Agnes Gulyas (1998). "Tabloid Newspapers in Post Communist Hungary". Journal of the European Institute for Communication and Culture. 5 (3): 65–77. doi:10.1080/13183222.1998.11008683.
  4. ^ Katalin S. Milter (2008). The Impact of Politics on Post-communist Media in Eastern Europe: An Historical Case Study of the 1996 Hungarian Broadcasting Act. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-549-69522-6.
  5. ^ a b c "Hungarian Step By Maxwell". The New York Times. AP. 1 October 1990. Retrieved 26 December 2014.
  6. ^ Oksana Buranbaeva; Vanja Mladineo (30 September 2011). Culture and Customs of Hungary. ABC-CLIO. p. 102. ISBN 978-0-313-38369-4.
  7. ^ Greg MacDonald (1990). The Emergence of Global Multi-media Conglomerates. International Labour Organization. p. 34. ISBN 978-92-2-107669-8.
  8. ^ a b Marina Popescu; Gábor Tóka (2000). "Campaign Effects in the 1994 and 1998 Parliamentary Elections in Hungary" (Conference paper). ECPR. Retrieved 15 February 2015.

External linksEdit