Elliott Nugent

Elliott Nugent (September 20, 1896 – August 9, 1980)[3] was an American actor, playwright, writer, and film director.

Elliott Nugent
Elliot Nugent.jpg
Nugent in a 1947 publicity photo
BornSeptember 20, 1896
Dover, Ohio, U.S.
DiedAugust 9, 1980 (aged 83)
New York City, U.S.
Spouse(s)Norma Lee (1921–1980; his death) [1][2]
Parent(s)J. C. Nugent (father)

BiographyEdit

Nugent was born in Dover, Ohio, the son of actor J.C. Nugent.[4] He successfully made the transition from silent film to sound film. He directed The Cat and the Canary (1939), starring Bob Hope and Paulette Goddard.[5] He also directed the Hope films Never Say Die (1939) and My Favorite Brunette (1947).[6]

Nugent was a college classmate (and lifelong friend) of fellow Ohioan James Thurber.[7] Together, they wrote the Broadway play The Male Animal (1940)[4] in which Nugent starred with Gene Tierney. He also directed the 1942 film version of The Male Animal, starring Henry Fonda and Olivia de Havilland.[8]

Nugent was the brother-in-law of actor Alan Bunce of Ethel and Albert fame.[9]

He died in his sleep at his New York home.[10]

Partial filmographyEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Wise Girls (1929)". American Film Institute Catalog.
  2. ^ Nugent, Elliott (1965). Events Leading Up to the Comedy: An Autobiography by Elliott Nugent. New York: Trident. p. 100.
  3. ^ "Elliott Nugent". Encyclopedia Britannica.
  4. ^ a b Cullen, Frank; Hackman, Florence; McNeilly, Donald (2007). Vaudeville old & new: an encyclopedia of variety performances in America. Psychology Press. p. 838. ISBN 9780415938532. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  5. ^ "The Cat and the Canary (1939) - Elliott Nugent | Synopsis, Characteristics, Moods, Themes and Related". AllMovie.
  6. ^ "Overview for Elliott Nugent". Turner Classic Movies.
  7. ^ "Elliott Nugent | Biography, Movie Highlights and Photos". AllMovie.
  8. ^ "The Male Animal (1942) - Overview - TCM.com". Turner Classic Movies.
  9. ^ "Family for Elliott Nugent". Turner Classic Movies.
  10. ^ "Elliott Nugent, 83, Actor-Writer, Dies". The New York Times. 1980-08-11. Retrieved 2021-06-24.

External linksEdit