Ellen Thomas

Ellen Thomas (born January 24, 1947) is an American peace activist. She first became involved with the White House Peace Vigil on April 13, 1984. The daughter of a U.S. Marine, Thomas was born in Brooklyn and grew up in California. She became opposed to nuclear weapons during her childhood.[1] In protest at the policies of the United States government, she became a tax resister by simply living below the income tax threshold.[2]

Ellen Thomas
EllenThomas.jpg
Born
Ellen Thomas

(1947-01-24) January 24, 1947 (age 74)
NationalityAmerican
Occupationpeace activist

On May 6, 1984, Ellen Benjamin married Thomas in a Quaker wedding to become Ellen Thomas.[3] Thomas and her husband protested together for a number of years, until his death in January 2009 of pulmonary disease.[4]

Ellen also heads The Proposition One Non-Radioactive Nuclear Review, a traveling multimedia troupe that educates the public on the dangers of a nuclear future. In 1993 she helped coordinate the successful Washington DC ballot initiative for Nuclear Disarmament and Economic Conversion.[5] Ellen formally served on the Washington Peace Center's board of directors, but has since moved to North Carolina.[6]

The Oracles of Pennsylvania Avenue (2012) by Tim Wilkerson, a documentary commissioned by the Al Jazeera Documentary Channel, recounts the lives of William and Ellen Thomas, Concepción Picciotto and Norman Mayer.[7]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Ellen Thomas
  2. ^ Matt Hagengruber (July 9, 2000). "DC protest group stands test of time". KnightRidder. I decided that when I didn't need to worry about providing for my daughter, I was going to reduce my income to below the poverty level so I wouldn't have to pay taxes, because I don't agree with the policies [of the U.S. government]
  3. ^ Birth of a street person by Lloyd Grove
  4. ^ http://www.afterdowningstreet.org/node/39316
  5. ^ Anti-nuclear activists to visit today[permanent dead link]
  6. ^ John Kelly (November 6, 2011), "For 30-year peace activist, a new battle", The Washington Post, Ellen, who moved to the mountains of North Carolina after his [her husband's] death
  7. ^ The Oracles of Pennsylvania Avenue

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