Eitarō Ozawa (小沢 栄太郎, Ozawa Eitarō, 27 March 1909 – 23 April 1988), also credited as Sakae Ozawa (小沢栄), was a Japanese film actor and stage actor and director.[1] He appeared in more than 200 films between 1935 and 1988, directed by notable filmmakers such as Kenji Mizoguchi, Mikio Naruse, Keisuke Kinoshita and Kaneto Shindō.[2][3]

Eitarō Ozawa
Ozawa in 1956
Born(1909-03-27)27 March 1909
Minato, Tokyo, Japan
Died23 April 1988(1988-04-23) (aged 79)
Other namesSakae Ozawa
Occupation(s)Actor, director
Years active1930-1988

Biography

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After leaving high school prematurely, Ozawa started acting in the left-wing theatre groups Toho Sayoku Gekijo and Shinkyo Gekidan.[1] He gave his film debut at the P.C.L. film studio (later Toho) in 1935.[2] In 1940, the authorities ordered the dissolution of the Shinkyo Gekidan and arrested many of its members, including Ozawa, who was forced to change his stage name Sakae to his real name Eitarō.[1] After his release, he joined the Shochiku studio and starred in films by Tomu Uchida, Tomotaka Tasaka and Keisuke Kinoshita.[1] In 1944, he co-founded the Haiyuza theatre group, but was drafted in the same year.[1] After the war, he returned to the Haiyuza and started appearing in films again such as Yasujirō Ozu's Record of a Tenement Gentleman (1947), Akira Kurosawa's Scandal (1950) and Mizoguchi's Ugetsu (1953) and The Crucified Lovers (1954).[1] For a few years, he took his former stage name Sakae again, before ultimately returning to Eitarō.[1]

In addition to acting, Ozawa was active as a director of stage plays, including Bertolt Brecht's The Good Person of Szechwan which he had seen performed in Berlin,[4] and as a writer.[1]

Filmography (selected)

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Films

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Television

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Awards and honours (selected)

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References

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  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "小沢 栄太郎 (Eitaro Ozawa)". Kotobank (in Japanese). Retrieved 27 July 2021.
  2. ^ a b "小沢栄 (Sakae Ozawa)". Japanese Movie Database (in Japanese). Retrieved 27 July 2021.
  3. ^ "小沢 栄太郎 (Eitaro Ozawa)". Kinenote (in Japanese). Retrieved 27 July 2021.
  4. ^ Tatlow, Antony; Wong, Tak-Wai, eds. (1982). Brecht and East Asian Theatre. Hong Kong University Press. p. 115. ISBN 9789622090682.
  5. ^ "毎日映画コンクール 第1回(1946年)". Mainichi (in Japanese). Retrieved 16 July 2023.
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