Edmonton (provincial electoral district)

The Edmonton provincial electoral district also known as Edmonton City[1] from 1905 to 1909, was a provincial electoral district in Alberta, Canada mandated to return members to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1905 to 1917 and again from 1921 to 1959.[2]

Edmonton
Alberta electoral district
Defunct provincial electoral district
LegislatureLegislative Assembly of Alberta
District created1905
District abolished1917
District re-created1921
District re-abolished1955
First contested1909
Last contested1959

The Edmonton electoral district existed in two incarnations from 1905 - 1909 and again from 1921 - 1955, with the city (small as it was in former times) broken up into multiple constituencies in the other time-periods. The district was created when Alberta became a province, to encompass residents of the city of Edmonton on the northside of the North Saskatchewan River. For a time, it was one of three multi-member constituencies in the province's history, the others being Calgary and Medicine Hat.

HistoryEdit

Three methods of electing representatives were used over the years.

First past the post election of a single member was used in 1905 and subsequent elections and by-elections up to 1920.

Block voting (voters able to cast as many votes as there were seats, that is, 2) was used in 1909 and 1913 and with five seats in 1921.

The Edmonton constituency was divided into two single-member constituencies for the provincial election of 1917: Edmonton East and Edmonton West. The adjacent constituency of Edmonton South had been renamed from the old constituency of Strathcona.

The three Edmonton districts were merged to form the Edmonton constituency in 1921, and block voting was established in 1921, to elect five members in the constituency.

As a semblance of proportional representation, the UFA government brought in the single transferable vote for all constituencies, and made Edmonton, Calgary and Medicine Hat (for 1926 only) multi-member constituencies, with votes apportioned as per the Hare system, starting in 1924. STV, and the Hare system, where applicable, was also used in provincial by-elections during this period. Edmonton had five seats in 1926, then six seats in 1930 and 1935, then five until 1952. Edmonton had seven seats elected at-large in 1952 and 1955.

In 1959 the Social Credit government broke up the Calgary and Edmonton constituencies and replaced the transferable balloting with first-past-the-post single-member districts across the province. Eight constituencies were created in Edmonton: Edmonton Centre, Edmonton North, Edmonton Norwood, Edmonton North East, Edmonton North West, Jasper West, Strathcona Centre, Strathcona East and Strathcona West.

Expansion of seats and districts in EdmontonEdit

The first table shows at a glance, the number of seats available by general election year for the Edmonton riding. The second table shows the number of districts in Edmonton, when the Edmonton riding was broken up.

SeatsEdit

Year 1905 1909 1913 1921 1926 1930 1935 1940 1944 1948 1952 1955
Seats 1 2 2 5 5 6 6 5 5 5 7 7

DistrictsEdit

Year 1913 1917 1959 1963 1967 1971 1975 1979 1982 1986 1989 1993 1997 2001 2004
Districts 1 3 9 10 11 16 16 18 18 17 17 18 19 19 18

For the 1913 election, Edmonton South Provincial electoral district was created from the old Strathcona constituency to elect one MLA. The Edmonton constituency elected two members by the block vote system.

Edmonton party composition at a glanceEdit

Affiliation 1905 1909 1913 1921 1926 1930 1935 1940 1942 1944 1948 1948 1952 1955
  Liberal 1 2 2 5 1 1 3 1 2 3
  Conservative 2 3 1 3 1 1
     Social Credit 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3
     Cooperative Commonwealth 1 1 1 1 1
     Labour 1 1
United Farmers 1 1
  Veteran's & Active Force 1
  Independent Citizen's 1
  Independent 3 2 1 1
 Total
1 2 2 5 5 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 7 7

(Note: Independents in the 1940s were members of the Unity League, an anti-SC coalition of Liberal and Conservatives.)

Election resultsEdit

1905 general electionEdit

1905 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Charles Wilson Cross 1,209 70.09%
Conservative William Antrobus Griesbach 516 29.91%
Total 1,725
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined N/A
Eligible electors / Turnout 1,725 100.00%
Liberal pickup new district.
Source(s)
Source: "Edmonton-City Official Results 1905 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
The Edmonton electoral district was known as Edmonton-City for the 1905 Alberta general election.

1909 general electionEdit

This election was conducted using block voting, where each Edmonton voter could cast up to two votes.

1909 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Elected
Liberal Charles Wilson Cross 3,282 40.01% -6.22%  Y
Liberal John Alexander McDougall 2,977 36.30% -6.22%  Y
Conservative Albert F. Ewing 1,595 19.45% -10.46%
Independent John Gailbraith 348 4.24%
Total 8,202
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined N/A
Eligible electors / Turnout N/A N/A N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Source(s)
Source: "Edmonton Official Results 1909 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Note: The total number of ballots cast or eligible electors is unknown.
Election held under multiple non-transferable vote to elect two members to the Legislative Assembly.

1912 by-electionEdit

Alberta provincial by-election, May 27, 1912
Ministerial by-election upon Charles Wilson Cross's appointment as Attorney-General on May 4, 1912
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Charles Wilson Cross 1,802 47.95%
Conservative Albert Ewing 1,733 47.18%
Socialist Joseph R. Knight 183 4.87%
Total 3,758
Rejected, spoiled, and declined N/A
Eligible electors / Turnout N/A N/A N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Source(s)
"By-elections". Elections Alberta. Retrieved 2020-03-12.

1913 general electionEdit

In the 1913 Alberta general election Premier Arthur Sifton, his lieutenant Charles Wilson Cross and Liberal candidate Alexander Grant MacKay each won nominations in two electoral districts. The Calgary Herald (a Conservative newspaper) surmised that Sifton and Cross were so scared of the electorate they felt they might not win if they ran in just one district. It accused Premier Sifton of having little confidence in his ability to return his government to power. Charles Cross would sit as a member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta for both Edmonton and Edson.

This election was conducted using block voting, where each Edmonton voter could cast up to two votes.

1913 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Elected
Liberal Charles Wilson Cross 5,407 26.29% -13.72%  Y
Conservative Albert Freeman Ewing 5,107 24.83%  Y
Liberal Alexander Grant MacKay 4,913 23.89% 4.44%
Conservative William Antrobus Griesbach 4,499 21.87% 2.43%
Independent J. D. Blayney 643 3.13%
Total 20,569
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined N/A
Eligible electors / Turnout 14,975 N/A N/A
Source(s)
Source: "Edmonton Official Results 1913 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Note: The total number of ballots cast is not known.
Election held under multiple non-transferable vote for two members to the Legislative Assembly.
The results do not include 10 polls which were not counted.[3]
Charles Wilson Cross was elected and chose to sit as the representative in both Edmonton and Edson.
Alexander Grant MacKay is erroneously listed as a Conservative for the 1913 election in many Government of Alberta publications, likewise Albert Freeman Ewing is erroneously listed as a Liberal

1921 general electionEdit

This election was conducted using block voting, where each Edmonton voter could cast up to five votes. The percentages shown in the table below indicate the proportion of the voters casting votes who may have cast votes in the candidate's favour. For example, a third of the voters casting all five of their votes for the Liberals would accrue a total of 150 "percent" of the votes while the candidates would still only receive the support of a third of the voters. With the rest of the votes split among other parties, the Liberals with only a third of the voter support did take all the Edmonton seats in this election.

1921 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % Elected
Liberal Andrew Robert McLennan 6,498 36.20%  Y
Liberal John Campbell Bowen 5,803 32.33%  Y
Liberal Nellie McClung 5,388 30.02%  Y
Liberal John Robert Boyle 5,361 29.86%  Y
Liberal Jeremiah Wilfred Heffernan 5,289 29.46%  Y
United Farmers William Jackman 4,978 27.73%
Conservative Albert Freeman Ewing 4,777 26.61%
Labour A. A. Campbell 3,736 20.81%
Conservative Herbert Howard Crawford 3,553 19.79%
Conservative Elizabeth Ferris 3,188 17.76%
Labour Robert McCreath 2,931 16.33%
Independent Joseph Woods Adair 2,571 14.32%
Labour Elmer Ernest Roper 2,515 14.01%
Conservative Ambrose Upton Gledstanes Bury 2,509 13.98%
Conservative William A. Wells 2,329 12.97%
Independent James Kennedy Cornwall 2,082 11.60%
Independent A. L. Marks 1,744 9.72%
Independent Liberal Gerald Pelton 1,467 8.17%
Independent William Short 1,447 8.06%
Independent Labour William R. Ball 1,409 7.85%
Independent A. Boileau 1,226 6.83%
Independent Labour Mary Cantin 1,133 6.31%
Independent Labour Ernest Brown 1,073 5.98%
Independent Labour James Bailey 941 5.24%
Independent Labour Joe E. White 927 5.16%
Labour Socialist Marie Millard 883 4.92%
Total votes cast 17,951
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined N/A
Eligible electors / Turnout N/A N/A N/A
Source(s)
Source: "Edmonton Official Results 1921 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Election held under multiple non-transferable vote for five members to the Legislative Assembly.

1924 Edmonton by-ElectionEdit

This was the first election in Alberta to use STV, the system just introduced for elections in Alberta's largest cities.

W.T. Henry got the most votes in the first count but no candidate received a majority of them so subsequent counts were held using second choices of the lower-ranking candidates. He was elected on third count.

Communist Party candidate H.M. Bartholomew showed strong third place showing, almost exceeding Conservative candidate on the second count.

1926 general electionEdit

The sum of the candidates' vote totals below do not equal the votes cast recorded here because of the number of spoiled ballots, an unfortunate by-product of STV. 15,130 valid ballots were cast in Edmonton in this election.

Under the STV procedure used (the Hare system), the quota necessary to win a seat was 3026 (15,130 divided by 5, the number of seats being contested). Prevey and Duggan won seats without the quota in the last counts, after other candidates were dropped out.

The result was roughly proportional with two Conservatives, a Liberal, a Labour and a UFA winning seats. Not all the five leaders in the first count were elected - Independent Liberal Joe Clarke did not make quota in first count and did not pick up enough votes from other candidates' later preferences to get quota, likely due to not being in a political party. Liberal candidate J.C. Bowen was in top five in first count, but also did not get quota and despite being in a party, was not elected - many of the other Liberal party supporters' second preferences went to another Liberal candidate, Prevey, a more popular individual overall, it seems.

Labour although not having anyone in top five spots in first count, did capture a seat. This was proportional - it received about 20 percent of the vote spread over five candidates. Farmilo, the leading labour candidate in the first count, was not elected though. Gibbs, who was apparently on an individual basis more popular overall than Farmilo, got quota in later counts through distribution of others' second preferences, such as Joe Clarke supporters probably.

Conservatives Duggan and Weaver did not get quota in first count. Weaver did later when his companion Conservative candidates were dropped out. Duggan got a seat by being one of the last ones still standing when the last counts were held.

1926 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes
1st count
% Votes
final count
Elected
United Farmers John Lymburn 3,046 16.27% 3,026  Y
Conservative Charles Yardley Weaver 2,202 11.76% 3,026  Y
Liberal Warren Prevey 1,517 8.10% 2,940  Y
Independent Liberal Joseph Clarke 1,179 6.30%
Liberal John C. Bowen 1,147 6.13%
Independent Samuel Barnes 1,060 5.66%
Labour Alfred Farmilo 973 5.20%
Conservative F. J. Folinsbee 881 4.71%
Labour Charles Gibbs 879 4.70% 3,026  Y
Liberal William Thomas Henry 858 4.58%
Conservative David Duggan 857 4.58% 2,265  Y
Conservative Herbert Crawford 782 4.18%
Labour James W. Findlay 628 3.35%
Labour Jan Lakeman 605 3.23%
Liberal William Rae 561 3.00%
Labour Elmer Roper 478 2.55%
Conservative Mark W. Robertson 361 1.93%
Independent John W. Leedy 140 0.75%
Total 18,154
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 567
Eligible electors / Turnout 33,741 55.48%
Source(s)
Source: "Edmonton Official Results 1926 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Election held under single transferable vote with a quota of 3,026 to elect five members to the Legislative Assembly.

1930 general electionEdit

1930 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes
1st count
% Votes
final count
Elected
United Farmers John Lymburn 3,230 14.76% 3,028  Y
Conservative David Duggan 2,665 12.18% 3,028  Y
Labour Charles Gibbs 2,262 10.34% 3,028  Y
Conservative Charles Weaver 2,013 9.20% 2,903  Y
Liberal William R. Howson 1,835 8.39% 2,915  Y
Conservative William Atkinson 1,786 8.16% 2,360  Y
Liberal Warren Prevey 1,331 6.08%
Liberal James Collisson 1,040 4.75%
Labour Alfred Farmilo 832 3.80%
Labour Samuel Barnes 818 3.74%
Independent Jan Lakeman 752 3.44%
Labour Daniel Kennedy Knott 745 3.41%
Conservative N. C. Willson 451 2.06%
Liberal G. V. Pelton 442 2.02%
Conservative J. A. Buchanan 424 1.94%
Independent Joseph Clarke 374 1.71%
Conservative R. D. Tighe 189 0.86%
Total 21,189
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 690
Eligible electors / Turnout 39,209 55.80%
Source(s)
Source: "Edmonton Official Results 1930 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Election held under single transferable vote with a quota of 3,028 to elect six members to the Legislative Assembly.

1935 general electionEdit

1935 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes
1st count
% Votes
final count
Elected
Liberal William Howson 9,139 24.52% 5,324  Y
Social Credit Samuel A. Barnes 4,476 12.01% 5,324  Y
Social Credit W. S. Hall 2,818 7.56%
Social Credit David B. Mullen 2,500 6.71% 4,932  Y
United Farmers John Farquhar Lymburnn 2,092 5.61%
Social Credit Orvis A. Kennedy 1,781 4.78%
Conservative David Milwyn Duggan 1,466 3.93% 5,078  Y
Liberal George Van Allen 1,255 3.37% 5,324  Y
Social Credit Mark W. Robertson 1,243 3.34%
Liberal Marion Conroy 1,238 3.32%
Conservative William Atkinson 1,220 3.27%
Liberal Gerald O'Connor 1,116 2.99% 4,922  Y
Communist Jan Lakeman 1,096 2.94%
Conservative Frederick Jamieson 1,029 2.76%
Social Credit G. L. King 843 2.26%
Liberal J. C. M. Marshall 673 1.81%
Conservative J. E. Basarab 671 1.80%
Liberal Walter Morrish 612 1.64%
Labour James East 505 1.36%
Conservative Emily Fitzsimon 363 0.97%
Labour James W. Findlay 331 0.89%
Economic Reconstruction Elsie Wright 192 0.52%
Labour Carl Berg 192 0.52%
Labour Sidney Bowcott 166 0.45%
Labour Alfred Farmilo 127 0.34%
Conservative D. M. Ramsay 71 0.19%
Labour Sidney Parsons 52 0.14%
Total 37,267
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 785
Eligible electors / Turnout 49,212 77.32%
Source(s)
Source: "Edmonton Official Results 1935 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Election held under single transferable vote to elect six members to the Legislative Assembly.

1940 general electionEdit

Five seats were open in this election. The Hare quota, the number of votes needed to win a seat, was 7291.

This election saw an anti-SC movement, made up of Liberals, Conservatives and some UFA-ers, get many seats. Page, Duggan and Macdonald were elected in Edmonton this election as candidates of the People's League AKA Unity Movement, recorded as Independent in results below. Four of that group's candidates placed in the top five spots in the first count, but this was un-proportional and the process thinned them down.

SC candidate Norman James placed low in the first count but got enough votes from other candidates who were dropped out, and from Manning's surplus votes, to take a seat, pushing out O'Connor, a Unity League candidate. He did this without achieving quota but by being one of the last ones standing when the field of candidates thinned out. Due to his personal popularity, he leapfrogged over a couple SC candidates to take the seat, demonstrating that the STV-PR is about voters' preferences for individual candidates and not party lists.

1940 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes
1st count
% Votes
final count
Elected
Social Credit Ernest Manning 10,066 23.32% 7,291  Y
Independent Movement John Percy Page 5,607 12.99% 7,291  Y
Independent Movement Hugh John MacDonald 4,128 9.56% 6,649  Y
Independent Movement David Milwyn Duggan 3,878 8.98% 6,731  Y
Independent Movement Gerald O'Connor 3,392 7.86%
Independent Movement L. Y. Cairns 3,316 7.68%
Co-operative Commonwealth Elmer Roper 1,984 4.60%
Co-operative Commonwealth Harry Dean Ainlay 1,840 4.26%
Independent E. C. Fisher 1,607 3.72%
Social Credit Charles Gould 1,192 2.76%
Social Credit Elisha East 1,117 2.59%
Communist James A. MacPherson 1,067 2.47%
Social Credit Norman B. James 967 2.24% 7,133  Y
Social Credit Charles B. Wills 948 2.20%
Independent Marjorie Pardee 822 1.90%
Co-operative Commonwealth William H. Miller 442 1.02%
Independent G. F. Hustler 400 0.93%
Independent Progressive Samuel Barnes 282 0.65%
Independent Progressive J. H. Green 108 0.25%
Total 43,163
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 1,784
Eligible electors / Turnout 59,685 75.31%
Source(s)
"Edmonton results 1940 Alberta general election". Alberta Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2010-12-08.
Note: Five seats were awarded in the Edmonton Electoral District through single transferable vote. The Hare Quota, the number of votes needed to win a seat, was 7,291. Ernest Manning and John P. Page were elected on the first count.

Many of the candidates listed as Independents, such as sitting MLA D.M. Duggan, were candidates for the Unity League, an anti-SC alliance of Conservatives and Liberals.

1942 by-electionEdit

This by-election was run according to the Hare STV-PR in effect for Edmonton (and Calgary) at this time. Voters across Edmonton voted as the city was a single constituency at this time.

There was only one seat being contested so the system devolved to an Alternative Vote process, whereby the winner had to take a majority of the valid votes.

Lymburn, a former UFA cabinet minister, was running as an anti-SC Unity League candidate. He did well in the first count surpassing the vote total of the SC candidate; but both being passed by CCF-er Roper. It became a tight race between Roper and Lymburn. The winner was not named until the fourth round after three of the five candidates had been eliminated and their second preferences distributed. There is such a high number of exhausted ballots because about half of the voters who voted for the SC, Soldiers Rep and Liberal candidates did not give second preferences.

But finally when the SC candidate, the third from the bottom in the first count, was dropped off in the fourth round, the final count for the last two candidates could be established and the winner decided. It is possible that in the last round, when the SC candidate was dropped off, most of his voters' second preferences went to Roper, apparently being thought more in tune with SC's help-the-little-guy philosophy than the Conservative/Liberal-member-dominated Unity League.

September 22, 1942 by-election[4] Turnout 32.71%
Affiliation Candidate 1st % Votes % Count
     Cooperative Commonwealth Elmer Roper 4,834 24.76% 8,432 53.98% 4th
  Independent John Lymburn 4,032 20.65% 7,188 46.02% 4th
  Social Credit G.B. Giles 4,432 22.70% Eliminated prior to 4th count
  Soldier Representative W. Griffin 3,389 17.36% Eliminated prior to 3rd count
  Liberal N.V. Buchanan 2,838 14.53% Eliminated prior to 2nd count
Valid Ballots 19,525 100% 15,620 100%
Exhausted Ballots 3,905 4 Counts

1944 general electionEdit

This election was held under the Hare STV-PR system.

1944 Hare quota was 6306 (one-fifth of the total valid ballots). Premier Manning got it in first count. His surplus votes (enough on their own to elect another candidate) were apparently spread among the other four SC candidates (or sent elsewhere or maybe his supporters did not put down a second preference) so none of the other SC candidates received enough to take a seat right off.

Page, running for the anti-SC Unity League, here identified as Independent, was in top five in the first count. The League, winding down, ran only one candidate and League votes were not spread around. He took enough votes in the first count to hold on to take a seat in later counts.

Johnnie Caine, a WWII ace, running as an Independent, was personally popular but did not get quota in the first count and not having a party behind him, did not receive many of the other candidates' second preferences when they were dropped off.

The first candidates to be dropped were mostly Communists and CCF candidates, whose voters it seems gave their second preferences to their own, such as Roper who took a seat, and then eventually to Norman James, of the SC party. He and William J. Williams were the last two standing when the field of candidates thinned out and they took seats even without achieving the quota.

1944 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes
1st count
% Votes
final count
Elected
Social Credit Ernest Manning 14,271 38.45% 6,306  Y
Co-operative Commonwealth Elmer Roper 5,253 14.15% 6,345  Y
Independent Movement John Percy Page 4,603 12.40% 6,333  Y
Veterans' and Active Force William J. Williams 2,818 7.59% 5,535  Y
Independent Johnnie Caine 1,400 3.77%
Social Credit Henry Carrigan 1,188 3.20%
Social Credit Orvis A. Kennedy 876 2.36%
Co-operative Commonwealth Clifford Lee 854 2.30%
Social Credit Norman B. James 781 2.10% 3,532  Y
Social Credit John Gillies 755 2.03%
Labor–Progressive James A. MacPherson 742 2.00%
Co-operative Commonwealth James Enright 649 1.75%
Co-operative Commonwealth M. E. Butterworth 549 1.48%
Co-operative Commonwealth Joseph Dowler 545 1.47%
Labor–Progressive William Halina 496 1.34%
Independent Cecil Chapman 476 1.28%
Independent Clarence Richards 422 1.14%
Labor–Progressive Jan Lakeman 251 0.68%
Labor–Progressive Alex Herd 119 0.32%
Labor–Progressive G.V. Murdoch 72 0.19%
Total 37,120
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 2,927
Eligible electors / Turnout 65,651 61.00%
Source(s)
"Edmonton results 1944 Alberta general election". Alberta Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2010-12-08.
Note: Five seats were awarded in the Edmonton Electoral District through single transferable vote. The Hare Quota, the number of votes needed to win a seat, was 6,306. Ernest Manning was elected on the first count.

1948 general electionEdit

This election was held under the Hare STV-PR system.

The 1948 Hare quota was 7692. Manning got it in first count. His surplus votes probably helped elect other two SC candidates.

Prowse also got quota but no other Liberal got in on his shirt-tails.

Elmer Roper too exceeded quota. His surplus was not distributed, perhaps because by then the count was at an end with only two candidates left standing to fill two remaining seats. Two SC-ers, Heard and Clayton, took these without achieving quota.

Result was roughly proportional to the three parties that ran in this contest. (The Conservatives stayed out, supporting Page, an opponent of the SC government, running for the Independent Citizens' Association.)

Premier Manning alone took almost half the votes in the first count, and his party took more than half the seats. The CCF took one sixth of the votes and one-fifth of the seats. The Liberals took about one-fifth the votes and one-fifth of the seats. Only about one-tenth of the votes were wasted - this included Page.

On a candidate basis, two of the top five in the first count were not elected. Page was not popular with enough second preferences, while Liberal Lazarowich also did not have holding power.

1948 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes
1st count
% Votes
final count
Elected
Social Credit Ernest Manning 22,014 47.45% 7,692  Y
Co-operative Commonwealth Elmer Ernest Roper 6,511 14.03% 8,684  Y
Liberal James Harper Prowse 6,302 13.58% 7,692  Y
Independent Citizen's John Percy Page 2,723 5.87%
Liberal Peter Lazarowich 1,234 2.66%
Co-operative Commonwealth Jack Hampson 1,046 2.25%
Social Credit Clayton Adams 946 2.04% 7,559  Y
Liberal Mary Scullion 942 2.03%
Social Credit Lou Heard 890 1.92% 7,746  Y
Social Credit John Gillies 772 1.66%
Co-operative Commonwealth Mary Crawford 618 1.33%
Liberal Francis Ford 565 1.22%
Social Credit Walter Crockett 523 1.13%
Co-operative Commonwealth Arthur Thornton 498 1.07%
Co-operative Commonwealth J. H. Dowler 370 0.80%
Liberal William Brownlee 442 0.95%
Total 46,396
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 880
Eligible electors / Turnout 84,391 56.02%
Source(s)
"Edmonton results 1948 Alberta general election". Alberta Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2010-12-08.
Note: Five seats were awarded in the Edmonton Electoral District through single transferable vote. The Hare Quota, the number of votes needed to win a seat, was 7,692. Ernest Manning was elected on the first count.

1952 general electionEdit

1952 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes
1st count
% Votes
final count
Elected
Social Credit Ernest Manning 17,022 29.73% 6,505  Y
Liberal James Harper Prowse 7,264 12.69% 6,505  Y
Co-operative Commonwealth Elmer Roper 6,632 11.58% 6,505  Y
Conservative John Percy Page 2,212 3.86% 5,504  Y
Social Credit Joseph Donovan Ross 1,757 3.07% 6,505  Y
Social Credit Ambrose Holowach 1,381 2.41%
Liberal Andre Milville Dechene 1,340 2.34%
Liberal Peter J. Lazarowich 1,136 1.98%
Social Credit Harry D. Carrigan 1,135 1.98%
Social Credit Stella M. Baker 1,126 1.97%
Conservative Marshall E. Manning 1,060 1.85%
Liberal Harold Tanner 875 1.53% 4,921  Y
Social Credit Williston Haszard 834 1.46%
Labor–Progressive Bernard R. Swankey 824 1.44%
Liberal Cora Casselman 819 1.43%
Social Credit Edgar Gerhart 769 1.34% 5,895  Y
Co-operative Commonwealth Robert Atkin 658 1.15%
Liberal Laurette C. Douglas 632 1.10%
Co-operative Commonwealth Roy Jamha 619 1.08%
Co-operative Commonwealth Arthur E. Thornton 612 1.07%
Liberal Duncan Innes 608 1.06%
Co-operative Commonwealth Floyd Albin Johnson 500 0.87%
Conservative Marcel Lambert 432 0.75%
Conservative Frederick John Mitchell 430 0.75%
Co-operative Commonwealth Norman Finnemore 413 0.72%
Co-operative Commonwealth Winnifred Scott 383 0.67%
Conservative Mrs. Arnold Taylor 272 0.48%
Conservative John A. L. Smith 189 0.33%
Conservative Edward Sturrock 105 0.18%
Total 52,039
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 5,217
Eligible electors / Turnout 108,424 52.81%
Source(s)
"Edmonton results 1952 Alberta general election". Alberta Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2010-12-08.
Note: Seven seats were awarded in the Edmonton Electoral District through single transferable vote. The Hare Quota, the number of votes needed to win a seat, was 6,505. Ernest Manning, James Harper Prowse, and Elmer Roper were elected on the first count.

1955 general electionEdit

1955 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes
1st count
% Votes
final count
Elected
Social Credit Ernest Charles Manning 23,216 30.33% 9,569  Y
Liberal James Harper Prowse 18,755 24.50% 9,569  Y
Co-operative Commonwealth Elmer Ernest Roper 4,444 5.81%
Conservative John Percy Page 4,086 5.34% 9,224  Y
Liberal Edgar Bailey 2,971 3.88%
Liberal Andre Dechene 2,877 3.76%
Liberal Abe William Miller 2,787 3.64% 9,569  Y
Social Credit Anthony Hlynka 1,896 2.48%
Liberal J. Laurier Payment 1,640 2.14%
Liberal Harold Tanner 1,604 2.10% 9,569  Y
Social Credit Joseph Donovan Ross 1,575 2.06% 9,483  Y
Social Credit Edgar Gerhart 1,320 1.72% 9,121  Y
Conservative Gifford Main 1,064 1.39%
Labor–Progressive William Harasym 947 1.24%
Co-operative Commonwealth Robert Atkin 940 1.23%
Social Credit William J.M. Henning 785 1.03%
Conservative Gerard Amerongen 692 0.90%
Social Credit Cyril G. Havard 602 0.79%
Social Credit Mrs. C.N. Hattersley 555 0.73%
Liberal Lois Grant 552 0.72%
Conservative Robert F. Lambert 548 0.72%
Co-operative Commonwealth Floyd Johnson 458 0.60%
Conservative Frederick John Mitchell 405 0.53%
Co-operative Commonwealth Mary Crawford 383 0.50%
Co-operative Commonwealth Ivor G. Dent 328 0.43%
Conservative Mrs. John A. L. Smith 299 0.39%
Co-operative Commonwealth Arthur E. Thompson 290 0.38%
Conservative Robert L. Brower 221 0.29%
Co-operative Commonwealth Hubert M. Smith 177 0.23%
Independent Charles E. Payne 127 0.17%
Total 76,544
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 6,248
Eligible electors / Turnout 127,069 65.15%
Source(s)
"Edmonton results 1955 Alberta general election". Alberta Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2010-12-08.
Note: Seven seats were awarded in the Edmonton Electoral District through single transferable vote. The Hare Quota, the number of votes needed to win a seat, was 5,969.

By-ElectionsEdit

Party 1937 1936 1931 1924
Liberal Edward Leslie Gray
17,788
W. Morrish
9,863
John C. Bowen
2,934
William Thomas Henry
4,640
Conservative Frederick Jamieson
8,026
Albert Ewing
4,238
Labour Elmer Roper
5,583
H.M. Bartholomew
4,118
People's Candidate Joseph Clarke
10,000
Soldier Representative W. Griffen
3,389
Communist Jan Lakeman
1,779
Jan Lakeman
813
Unity Margaret Crang
6,129
Cooperative Commonwealth Harry Dean Ainlay
2,056
Progressive Labour Margaret Crang
1,275
Independent Rice Sheppard
257
G.V. Pelton
1,131

Plebiscite resultsEdit

1948 Electrification PlebisciteEdit

District results from the first province wide plebiscite on electricity regulation.

Option A Option B
Are you in favour of the generation and distribution of electricity being continued by the Power Companies? Are you in favour of the generation and distribution of electricity being made a publicly owned utility administered by the Alberta Government Power Commission?
22,351     50.99% 21,478     49.01%
Province wide result: Option A passed.

1957 liquor plebisciteEdit

1957 Alberta liquor plebiscite results: Edmonton[5]
Question A: Do you approve additional types of outlets for the
sale of beer, wine and spirituous liquor subject to a local vote?
Ballot Choice Votes %
Yes 46,219 71.98%
No 17,994 28.02%
Total Votes 64,213 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 75
127,279 Eligible Electors, Turnout 50.94%
Question B2: Should mixed drinking be allowed
in beer parlours in Edmonton and the surrounding areas?
Ballot Choice Votes %
Yes 48,645 75.85%
No 15,485 24.15%
Total Votes 64,134 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 622
127,279 Eligible Electors, Turnout 50.88%

On October 30, 1957 a stand-alone plebiscite was held province wide in all 50 of the then current provincial electoral districts in Alberta. The government decided to consult Alberta voters to decide on liquor sales and mixed drinking after a divisive debate in the Legislature. The plebiscite was intended to deal with the growing demand for reforming antiquated liquor control laws.[6]

The plebiscite was conducted in two parts. Question A asked in all districts, asked the voters if the sale of liquor should be expanded in Alberta, while Question B asked in a handful of districts within the corporate limits of Calgary and Edmonton asked if men and woman were allowed to drink together in establishments.[5] Question B was slightly modified depending on which city the voters were in.[5]

Province wide Question A of the plebiscite passed in 33 of the 50 districts while Question B passed in all five districts. Edmonton voted overwhelmingly in favor of the plebiscite. The district recorded slightly above average voter turnout almost just over the province wide 46% average with over half of eligible voters casting a ballot.[5]

Edmonton also voted on Question B2. Residents voted for mixed drinking with a super majority. Turnout for question B. Turnout for Question B was slightly lower and than Question A.[5]

Official district returns were released to the public on December 31, 1957.[5] The Social Credit government in power at the time did not considered the results binding.[7] However the results of the vote led the government to repeal all existing liquor legislation and introduce an entirely new Liquor Act.[8]

Municipal districts lying inside electoral districts that voted against the Plebiscite were designated Local Option Zones by the Alberta Liquor Control Board and considered effective dry zones, business owners that wanted a license had to petition for a binding municipal plebiscite in order to be granted a license.[9]

Also seeEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Office of the Chief Electoral Officer; Legislative Assembly Office (2006). A Century of Democracy: Elections of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta, 1905-2005. The Centennial Series. Edmonton, AB: Legislative Assembly of Alberta. p. 37. ISBN 0-9689217-8-7. Retrieved 25 May 2020.
  2. ^ "Election results for Edmonton". abheritage.ca. Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved 22 May 2020.
  3. ^ Office of the Chief Electoral Officer; Legislative Assembly Office (2006). A Century of Democracy: Elections of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta, 1905-2005. The Centennial Series. Edmonton, AB: Legislative Assembly of Alberta. p. 56. ISBN 0-9689217-8-7. Retrieved 25 May 2020.
  4. ^ "C.C.F. Candidate Wins By-Election at Edmonton Tuesday". Red Deer Advocate. September 23, 1942. p. 1.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Alberta Gazette. 53 (December 31 ed.). Government of Alberta. 1957. pp. 2, 247–2, 249.
  6. ^ "Albertans Vote 2 to 1 For More Liquor Outlets". Vol L No 273. The Lethbridge Herald. October 31, 1957. pp. 1–2.
  7. ^ "No Sudden Change In Alberta Drinking Habits Is Seen". Vol L No 267. The Lethbridge Herald. October 24, 1957. p. 1.
  8. ^ "Entirely New Act On Liquor". Vol LI No 72. The Lethbridge Herald. March 5, 1968. p. 1.
  9. ^ "Bill 81". Alberta Bills 12th Legislature 1st Session. Government of Alberta. 1958. p. 40.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 53°33′N 113°29′W / 53.55°N 113.49°W / 53.55; -113.49