Open main menu

Wikipedia β

Don't Worry (Marty Robbins song)

"Don't Worry" is a 1961 country/pop single written and recorded by Marty Robbins. "Don't Worry" was Marty Robbins' seventh number one on the country chart and stayed at number one for ten weeks.[1] The single crossed over to the pop chart and was one of Marty Robbins' most successful crossover songs, peaking at number three on the Hot 100 [2]

"Don't Worry"
Single by Marty Robbins
from the album More Greatest Hits
B-side "Like All the Other Times"[1]
Released February 6, 1961
Format 7" single
Recorded 1960
Genre Country
Length 3:15
Label Columbia
Songwriter(s) Marty Robbins
Producer(s) Don Law
Marty Robbins singles chronology
"Five Brothers"
(1960)
"Don't Worry"
(1961)
"Jimmy Martinez"
(1961)
"Five Brothers"
(1960)
"Don't Worry"
(1961)
"Jimmy Martinez"
(1961)

"Don't Worry" is an early example of guitar distortion. Session guitarist Grady Martin, using a faulty channel in the mixing-desk for his six-string bass, created a distorted sound. Although Martin did not like the sound, Robbins' producer left the guitar track as it was.[3][4][5]

Contents

Cover versionsEdit

Chart performanceEdit

Chart (1961) Peak
position
US Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[6] 1
US Billboard Hot 100[7] 3

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Whitburn, Joel (2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 355. ISBN 0-89820-177-2. 
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits: Eighth Edition. Record Research. p. 533. 
  3. ^ Halterman, Del (2009). Walk-Don't Run - The Story of the Ventures. Lulu.com. p. 81. ISBN 978-0-557-04051-3. 
  4. ^ Kosser, Michael. How Nashville Became Music City USA. p. 49. 
  5. ^ Diane Diekman (2012-02-15). Twentieth Century Drifter: The Life of Marty Robbins. Books.google.co.uk. p. 75. Retrieved 2016-09-26. 
  6. ^ "Marty Robbins Chart History (Hot Country Songs)" Billboard.
  7. ^ "Marty Robbins Chart History (Hot 100)" Billboard.

External linksEdit

Preceded by
"Wings of a Dove"
by Ferlin Husky
Billboard Hot C&W Sides
number-one single

February 27-May 1, 1961
Succeeded by
"Hello Walls"
by Faron Young