Open main menu
Minor planets discovered: 10 [1]
9084 Achristou February 3, 1995
10369 Sinden February 8, 1995
12395 Richnelson February 8, 1995
15834 McBride February 4, 1995
16693 Moseley December 26, 1994
22403 Manjitludher June 5, 1995
26891 Johnbutler February 7, 1995
37678 McClure February 3, 1995
42531 McKenna June 5, 1995[2]
58345 Moomintroll February 7, 1995

David J. Asher (born 1966, Edinburgh) is a British astronomer, who works at the Armagh Observatory (IAU code 981) in Northern Ireland.[3][4][5][6] He studied mathematics at Cambridge and received his doctorate from Oxford.[7] He is known for the meteor research that he conducts with Robert McNaught.[8][9][10][11] In 1999 and 2000, they accurately gauged when the Leonids meteor shower would peak, while underestimating the peak intensities.[12][13][14][15]

The Mars-crosser asteroid 6564 Asher, discovered by Robert McNaught in 1992, was named in his honor.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number)". Minor Planet Center. 4 September 2016. Retrieved 7 September 2016.
  2. ^ "Asteroid named for star gazer". The News Letter. May 22, 2006. Archived from the original on March 28, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2014 – via HighBeam Research.
  3. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). "(6564) Asher". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (6564) Asher. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 542. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-29925-7_5954. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3.
  4. ^ von Radowitz, John (July 3, 2006). "Fear Miss; LARGE ASTEROID BRUSHES EARTH". The Mirror. Retrieved October 30, 2014 – via Questia Online Library.
  5. ^ "Newly discovered asteroid could be Earth's companion". Hindustan Times. April 7, 2011. Archived from the original on March 28, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2014 – via HighBeam Research.
  6. ^ "Briefing: Asteroid 2004 XP14". The Herald (Glasgow). July 3, 2006. Archived from the original on March 28, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2014 – via HighBeam Research.
  7. ^ "David Asher". Archived from the original on 2011-06-09. Retrieved 2010-01-31.
  8. ^ Cowan, R. (December 4, 1999). "The Best Leonid Show Is Yet to Come?". Science News. Retrieved October 30, 2014 – via Questia Online Library.
  9. ^ Friedlander Jr., Blaine P. (November 11, 2002). "Leonids: Meteor Shower Power". Washington Post. Archived from the original on March 28, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2014 – via HighBeam Research.
  10. ^ "Last chance to see? The Leonid meteors". The Economist. November 10, 2001. Archived from the original on March 28, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2014 – via HighBeam Research.
  11. ^ "Asteroid heads for town centre". Birmingham Post. April 13, 2001. Archived from the original on March 28, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2014 – via HighBeam Research.
  12. ^ Chang, Kenneth (2001-11-13). "Coming Soon: Prime View of a Meteor Shower". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-01-31.
  13. ^ Cowan, R. (November 10, 2001). "Meteor Shower Promises Quite a Show". Science News. Retrieved October 30, 2014 – via Questia Online Library.
  14. ^ Chandler, David L. (November 17, 2000). "LEONID METEOR SHOWER REACHES PEAK ANNUAL EVENT WILL BE EXCITING, BUT NOT STELLAR". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on March 28, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2014 – via HighBeam Research.
  15. ^ Chandler, David L. (May 2, 1999). "Meteor mystery may be solved". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on March 28, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2014 – via HighBeam Research.

External linksEdit