Dale Fuller (actress)

Dale Fuller (born Marie Dale Phillipps; June 17, 1885 – October 14, 1948) was an American actress of the silent era.[1] She appeared in 67 films between 1915 and 1935. She is best known for her role as the maid in Foolish Wives.

Dale Fuller
Dale Fuller - Jun 1922 EH.jpg
Fuller in 1922
Born
Marie Dale Phillipps

(1885-06-17)June 17, 1885
DiedOctober 14, 1948(1948-10-14) (aged 63)
Resting placeForest Lawn Memorial Park
Years active1915–1935

Early lifeEdit

Marie Dale Phillipps was born in Santa Ana, California on June 17, 1885. She attended convent schools in Los Angeles and Chicago.[2] Fan magazines from the time claimed that she attended and graduated from Mills College, and Myrtle Gebhardt reported that Fuller lost her family at 19. Fuller said family illness brought her to California, where she decided to act.

CareerEdit

In 1908, she performed as a soubrette in the comedy The Trouper. She then joined the cast of Harry Bulgur’s The Flirting Princess, a musical revue, in 1910 and toured with it off and on throughout San Francisco, Chicago, Washington, and Rhode Island. The same year, she performed in the chorus of Florenz Ziegfeld’s The Girl in the Kimona in Chicago. She received good reviews for her performance, with Variety singling her out for praise.

In 1915, Fuller was introduced to Mack Sennett by Charlie Murray and joined Mack Sennett’s Keystone as an extra, with Sennett's often casting her as a harridan or victim in shorts.[3] Fuller would also occasionally play old men and boy roles due to her plain, boyish appearance and small stature.[4] The following year, she acted with Fred Mace in the short Bath Tub Perils and suffered two broken ribs during the flood sequence.

 
Dale Fuller in 1924

In 1920, Fuller left Keystone and began appearing in Chester Comedy films. Around this time, the Austrian film director Erich von Stroheim discovered her and cast her as a maid in Foolish Wives. During production, Fuller lost a substantial amount of weight and was hospitalized for double pneumonia. Her small part garnered positive reviews, with critics' saying her performance was the best part of the film. After the success of Foolish Wives, Fuller appeared in Manslaughter, One Wonderful Night, and Borderland.

Von Stroheim wrote a small part for her in his film Merry-Go-Round, and although her part was drastically cut from the picture, she still received good reviews for her portrayal. She next appeared in His Hour, the Elinor Glyn film Three Weeks, and von Stroheim's film McTeague, which later was renamed Greed. The studio cut most of her scenes from the film, but MGM added her to the stock company of actors that year. Fuller continued to work with von Stroheim, playing a chambermaid in his 1925 film The Merry Widow and as Fay Wray's mother in The Wedding March.

Fuller played Renée Adorée's mother in The Cossacks, and acted in Thomas Meighan's film The Canadian as Gertie. Her last film was A Tale of Two Cities, in which she played an uncredited role.

Personal life and deathEdit

Fuller was reserved and shy, which prevented her from promoting herself as an actress, which could have helped her career. She spent most of her time on her citrus farm near Covina, where she raised chickens, doves, canaries, dogs, cats, and a parrot.

Fuller died on October 14, 1948 in Pomona of valvular heart disease. She is interred at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.[5]

Partial filmographyEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hal Erickson (2014). "Dale Fuller". Movies & TV Dept. The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 11, 2014. Retrieved December 5, 2014.
  2. ^ Walker, Brent E. (April 25, 2013). Mack Sennett's Fun Factory: A History and Filmography of His Studio and His Keystone and Mack Sennett Comedies, with Biographies of Players and Personnel. McFarland. ISBN 9780786477111. Retrieved April 28, 2019 – via Google Books.
  3. ^ "Motography". April 28, 2019. Retrieved April 28, 2019 – via Google Books.
  4. ^ Walker, Brent E. (April 25, 2013). Mack Sennett's Fun Factory: A History and Filmography of His Studio and His Keystone and Mack Sennett Comedies, with Biographies of Players and Personnel. McFarland. ISBN 9780786477111. Retrieved April 28, 2019 – via Google Books.
  5. ^ Wilson, Scott (August 17, 2016). Resting Places: The Burial Sites of More Than 14,000 Famous Persons, 3d ed. McFarland. ISBN 9780786479924. Retrieved April 28, 2019 – via Google Books.

External linksEdit