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Country Party (South Australia)

The Country Party was a political party in South Australia in the first part of the 20th century. It was formed out of the Farmers and Settlers Association in September 1917 to represent the association's interests in parliament.[1] The party endorsed seven candidates in the 1918 election, with two elected. In the early years, their representatives were usually identified as Farmers and Settlers' Association representatives or as the parliamentary wing of the Farmers and Settlers' Association, but referred to in some sources as Country Party, Independent Country Party or independent members. The Country Party name was formally adopted after the 1921 election.[1]

Country Party (SA)
Founded1917 (1917)
Dissolved1932 (1932)
Merged intoLiberal and Country League
Colors     Green

The Country Party eventually merged with the Liberal Federation to create the Liberal and Country League (LCL) in 1932. As part of the merger agreement, state Country Party leader Archie Cameron was handed the federal seat of Barker, and eventually became federal leader of the party in 1939. Despite the winding-up of the Country Party at state level, the federal Country Party remained active in South Australia until 1940, when Cameron was ousted in a party room coup.

An independent Country Party, now The Nationals South Australia, was resurrected in 1962.

Elections contestedEdit

Through its life, the party contested five general elections. The House of Assembly (lower house) is completely elected each time. Only half of the Legislative Council (upper house) faces election each time, and a term was normally for six years. The legislative Council consisted of five electorates each of which had four members, with two terms expiring at each election.

As Farmers and Settlers, winning 1 seat in the House of Assembly and one in the Legislative Council
As Farmers and Settlers, winning 4 seats in the House of Assembly (Mills continued in the Legislative Council)
As the Country Party, winning two seats in the House of Assembly and two in the Legislative Council
As part of a coalition of the Liberal Federation and the Country Party, known at the time as the Pact Party[3] The coalition won back government with 28 of the 46 seats in the House of Assembly. The successful Country Party candidates were:

The membership transferred to the Liberal and Country League (LCL) in 1932.

Election resultsEdit

Election Seats won ± Total votes % Position Leader
1918
1 / 46
 1 13,844 4.28 Crossbench
1921
4 / 46
 3 16,417 4.09 Crossbench John Chapman
1924
2 / 46
 2 35,551 8.94 Crossbench Malcolm McIntosh
1927
5 / 46
 3 27,617 5.44 Coalition Malcolm McIntosh
1930
2 / 46
 3 14,555 6.93 Crossbench Archie Cameron

LeadershipEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Hetherington, Penelope (1986). "Mills, William George (1859–1933)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 10. Canberra: Australian National University. Retrieved 17 April 2015.
  2. ^ Stock, Jenny Tilby (1993). "Blesing, Albert Percy (1879–1949)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 13. Canberra: Australian National University. Retrieved 19 April 2015.
  3. ^ "THE STATE ELECTIONS". The Advertiser. Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia. 28 March 1927. p. 15. Retrieved 18 April 2015.
  4. ^ a b Playford, John (1993). "Cameron, Archie Galbraith (1895–1956)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 13. Canberra: Australian National University. Retrieved 19 April 2015.
  5. ^ "THE COUNTRY PARTY". Daily Herald. XII, (3538). South Australia. 21 July 1921. p. 7. Retrieved 3 July 2018 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  6. ^ "SPLIT IN COUNTRY PARTY". The Register (Adelaide). XCIII, (26, 988). South Australia. 14 February 1928. p. 9. Retrieved 3 July 2018 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)