Cork Premier Senior Football Championship

  (Redirected from Cork Senior Football Championship)

The Cork Premier Senior Football Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Bon Secours Cork Premier Senior Hurling Championship and abbreviated to the Cork PSFC) is an annual club Gaelic football competition organised by the Cork County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association and contested by the top-ranking senior clubs and amalgamated teams in the county of Cork in Ireland, deciding the competition winners through a group and knockout format. It is the most prestigious competition in Cork Gaelic football.

Cork Premier Senior Football Championship
Current season or competition:
2021 Cork Premier Senior Football Championship
IrishCraobh Peile Sinsearach Chorcaí
CodeGaelic football
Founded1887; 135 years ago (1887)
RegionColours of Cork.svg Cork (GAA)
TrophyAndy Scannell Cup
No. of teams12 (group stage)
3 (divisional qualifying round)
Title holdersColours of Tipperary.svg St. Finbarr's (10th title)
Most titlesColours of Maynooth.png Nemo Rangers (22 titles)
SponsorsBon Secours Hospital
TV partner(s)TG4, RTÉ
Official websiteCork GAA

Introduced in 1887 as the Cork Senior Football Championship, it was initially a straight knockout tournament open only to senior-ranking club teams, with its winner reckoned as the Cork county champion. The competition took on its current name in 2020, adding a round-robin group stage for clubs and limiting the number divisional entrants to the championship proper.

In its present format, the Cork Premier Senior Championship begins with a preliminary qualifying round for the divisional teams and educational institutions. The sole surviving team from this stage automatically qualified for the knockout phase. The 12 club teams are drawn into three groups of four teams and play each other in a single round-robin system. The three group winners, three runners-up and three third-placed teams proceed to the knockout phase that culminates with the final match at Páirc Uí Chaoimh in October. The winner of the Cork Premier Senior Championship, as well as being presented with the Andy Scannell Cup, qualifies for the subsequent Munster Club Championship. In 2020, the intended format was disrupted and slightly amended due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Gaelic games.

The competition has been won by 29 teams, 19 of which have won it more than once. Nemo Rangers are the most successful team in the tournament's history, having won it 22 times.Remarkably, Nemo have won 22 county finals of the 26 they have been in. St. Finbarr's are the reigning champions, having beaten Clonakilty by 0-14 to 0-13 in the 2021 final.

HistoryEdit

19th centuryEdit

Following the foundation of the Gaelic Athletic Association in 1884, new rules for Gaelic football and hurling were drawn up and published in the United Irishman newspaper. Throughout 1886, county committees were established, with the Cork County Board affiliating on 19 December 1886. Plans to hold championships in both hurling and football were drawn up over the following weeks, with an advert inviting teams to enter appearing in the Cork Examiner on 15 January 1887. The cost of entering a team was 2s 6d and the closing date for entries was 29 January 1887. The championship draw took place at 23 Maylor Street on the day after the closing date and "the utmost good feeling was displayed, and...the contesting parties were agreeably satisfied" as the draw took place. Seven clubs entered: Blarney (who later withdrew), Carrignavar, Emmets, Glanmire, Lees, Lisgoold, Midleton.[1]

All of the matches in the inaugural championship took place at a special enclosure in Cork City Park, with the first match taking place "in the presence of several thousand persons" on 6 March 1887. Mr. J. E. Kennedy acted as referee and Messrs E. Cotter and W. Sheehan performed the duties of goal umpires. That game between Lees and Emmets was described in the Cork Examiner as being "closely contested", however, it was "not characterized [sic] by any particularly brilliant play" and ended in a scoreless draw. The replay two weeks later saw Lees record the first championship victory after a 1-02 to no score win over Emmets. The final first-round game between Lisgoold and Midleton also ended in a draw, however, it became the first ever championship match to feature extra-time when two fifteen-minute periods were played after the initial hour.The first final to be played took place on 10 July 1887, with Lees beating Lisgoold by 0-04 to 0-01.[2] They later went on to represent Cork in the first All-Ireland Championship.

The 1888 championship saw an increase in the number of participating teams to 27 from 25 different clubs, with Midleton and Lisgoold also fielding second teams. In an effort to cut down on travel costs for clubs, the County Board adopted a divisional structure to the championship. The participating teams were divided into seven divisions along geographic lines; Cork City, East Cork, Mid Cork, North Cork, North-East Cork, South Cork and West Cork. Tracton were the only representatives from South Cork. The six divisional champions and Tracton, as the sole South Cork representatives, qualified for the county-wide series of games.

Towards the end of 1888, a serious split in the Association in Cork lead to the existence of three rival and distinct county boards. 40 clubs left the official board and affiliated to the Cork Board, under the presidency of Fr. O'Connor, and the O'Brien Board under the presidency of Fr. Carver.[3][4] These three boards ran their own separate championships over the following two seasons, however, the Cork County Board remained as the official administrative branch of the GAA. In 1890, Midelton, as official county champions, became the first Cork representatives to win the All-Ireland Championship.[5] The three individual boards unified under the banner of the Cork County Board in 1891, with the championship continuing to be run on a divisional basis. The championship reverted to a straight knock-out format in 1892, with the first and second teams being separated in the draw.

20th centuryEdit

 
Civil unrest following the burning of Cork during the War of Independence led to the 1921 championship being cancelled.

On 10 March 1907, the newly-built Cork Athletic Grounds hosted the final for the very first time. It remained as the regular final venue for the following 67 years.[6] The War of Independence (1919-1921) saw Cork take a prominent role, something which had an adverse effect on the smooth running of the championships. Civil unrest following a series of events, including the murder of Lord Mayor Tomás Mac Curtain, the death from hunger strike of Lord Mayor Terence MacSwiney and the burning of Cork at the height of the war, resulted in the cancellation of the championships in 1921 and 1922.

The first decades of the new century brought new teams but not in a traditional sense. Food production company Crosse & Blackwell, third level educational institution University College Cork (UCC) and Collins Military Barracks all entered teams, however, UCC are the only team to continue fielding a team as of 2020.[7] The creation of the divisional boards in the late 1920s added a new dimension to the championship.[8] These divisional teams were composed of junior and intermediate players and afforded every player in the county the chance of winning a senior championship medal. Beara became the first division to win the title when they beat Clonakilty in the 1932 final.

 
The old Páirc Uí Chaoimh hosted the finals from 1976 to 2014.

After 90 years of using the single-elimination straight knock-out format, problems arose regarding the standard of the competing teams. A special committee was established to examine the possibility of restructuring the championship format. At the County Convention on 5 February 1978, delegates voted by 138 to 83 in favour of abandoning the knock-out format and adopting a group stage. This format was used for three successive season from 1978 until 1980, with Nemo Rangers and St. Finbarr's becoming the first teams to win the championship after suffering a defeat. At the County Convention on 25 January 1981, it was decided to abandon the group stage format and introduce a new graded draw with divisional, rural and city clubs all being grouped individually. The winners of the first two groupings progressed to one semi-final, with two of the city teams qualifying for the other semi-final. The new format was introduced to guarantee a city-county pairing in the final. The County Board voted to revert to the single-elimination straight knock-out format in 1982.

In 1995, Cork Regional Technical College was permitted to field a team in the championship for the first time.

21st centuryEdit

 
The redeveloped Páirc Uí Chaoimh became the regular final venue in 2017.

The introduction of a "back door" system at inter-county level in the All-Ireland Hurling Championship in 1997 led to the idea of introducing a second chance for defeated teams at county level. In 2000 a double-elimination format was introduced which afforded all club teams a second chance by remaining in the championship after a first-round defeat. In the two decades that followed the championship format continued to evolve with a number of minor tweaks. The provision of a second chance for defeated teams was later expanded to allow teams the opportunity of being defeated twice and still remain in the championship. The splitting of the intermediate grade in two resulted in the introduction of relegation in 2006, with Mallow and St. Michael's becoming the first teams to be relegated that year. Prior to this teams were allowed to decide for themselves if they wanted to regrade or retain their senior status.

Club dominanceEdit

City club Lees were the dominant force during the first thirty years of the championship. Between 1887 and 1914 they won ten championship titles before going into a period of decline. Their hegemony was closely followed by Fermoy who enjoyed their own golden era by winning six championships between 1895 and 1906. Lees city based rivals, Nils, also featured regularly in county finals and won six titles between 1894 and 1925.

Macroom joined the roll of honour by winning their first championship in 1909. Seven more titles followed up to 1935. After University College Cork made the breakthrough and dominated the 1920s, the following decade was dominated by divisional sides. Beara lead the way by claiming four championship titles between 1932 and 1940, while Duhallow and Carbery also won two championship titles at this time. Clonakilty made their own breakthrough by winning their first championship in 1939. It was the first of seven titles up to 1952. The rest of the decade belonged to St. Finbarr's, who became the first single-entity club to win championship titles in both hurling and Gaelic football. After a period in the doldrums, UCC were back as a dominant force by winning five championships between 1960 and 1973.

Since winning their first championship title in 1972, Nemo Rangers have gone on to dominate the championship. In the 45 years since then they have won a total of 21 championship titles. In spite of brief periods of dominance by other teams, most notably St. Finbarr's who won five titles between 1976 and 1985, Nemo Rangers have established themselves as the dominant force of Cork Gaelic football.

Formats usedEdit

For over 100 years the championship used a single elimination format. Each team was afforded only one defeat before being eliminated from the championship. The creation of the divisions in the 1920s added a new dimension to the championship. These divisional teams, which were composed of junior and intermediate players, competed in a preliminary section with the two winning teams advancing to the championship proper which retained its single elimination format. The introduction of a "back door" system at inter-county level in the All-Ireland Hurling Championship in 1997 lead to the idea of introducing a second chance for defeated teams at county level. In the twenty-year period from the late 1990s to 2017, the championship underwent a number of format changes. The provision of a second chance for defeated teams was later expanded to allow teams the opportunity of being defeated twice and still remain in the championship. The splitting of the intermediate grade in two resulted in the introduction of relegation in 2006. Prior to this teams were allowed to decide for themselves if they wanted to regrade or retain their senior status. In 2015 the championship once again reverted to a double elimination format.

FormatEdit

CurrentEdit

DevelopmentEdit

On 2 April 2019, a majority of 136 club delegates voted to restructure the championship once again.[9][10] The new format led to the splitting of the championship in two and the creation of the Cork Premier Senior Championship and the Cork Senior A Championship.

OverviewEdit

Group stage: The 12 club teams are divided into three groups of four. Over the course of the group stage, which features one game in April and two games in August, each team plays once against the others in the group, resulting in each team being guaranteed at least three games. Two points are awarded for a win, one for a draw and zero for a loss. The teams are ranked in the group stage table by points gained, then scoring difference and then their head-to-head record. The top two teams in each group qualify for the quarter-finals.

Divisional and colleges section: University College Cork, Cork Institute of Technology and the divisional sides compete in a separate section, with one team qualifying for the knock-out stage.

Preliminary quarter-finals: Two lone preliminary quarter-finals feature the three third-placed teams from the group stage and the winners of the divisional and colleges section. Two teams qualify for the next round.

Quarter-finals: The four quarter-finals feature the six teams from the group stage and the two preliminary quarter-final winners. Four teams qualify for the next round.

Semi-finals: The two semi-finals feature four teams. Two teams qualify for the next round.

Final: The two semi-final winners contest the final. The winning team are declared champions.

SponsorshipEdit

TSB Bank became the first title sponsor of the championship, serving in that capacity until 2005 when the Evening Echo signed a sponsorship deal. In 2020, Bon Secours Hospital were unveiled as the new title sponsor of the Cork Premier Senior Championship.[11]

Qualification for subsequent competitionsEdit

The Cork Premier Senior Football Championship winners qualify for the subsequent Munster Senior Club Football Championship. This place is reserved for club teams only as divisional and amalgamated teams are currently not allowed in the provincial championship. If a divisional side wins the Cork Championship then the runners-up, if they are a club team, qualify for the Munster Championship. This has occurred on several occasions.

VenuesEdit

Group stageEdit

 
Since 2017 the county final has been held at Páirc Uí Chaoimh, on the site of the previous stadium which hosted it from 1976 to 2014.

Fixtures in the group stage of the championship are usually played at a neutral venue that is deemed halfway between the participating teams. Some of the more common venues include Charlie Hurley Park, Brinny Sportsfield, Coachford Pitch, Sam Maguire Park and Rossa Park. All games in the knockout stage are played at either Páirc Uí Rinn or Páirc Uí Chaoimh.

FinalEdit

The final has been played at the rebuilt Páirc Uí Chaoimh since it opened in 2017. The rebuilding process meant that the finals of 2015 and 2016 were hosted at Páirc Uí Rinn. Continuing work on the pitch at the new stadium resulted in the 2019 final also being played at Páirc Uí Rinn.[12] Prior to rebuilding, the final was hosted by the original Páirc Uí Chaoimh since it opened in 1976. The final was played at the Mardyke in 1974 and 1975, while in the 70 years prior to the development of Páirc Uí Chaoimh the final was usually played at the Cork Athletic Grounds. From the inaugural championship in 1887 up to the turn of the 20th century, the final was held at a variety of venues in the city and around the county, most notably the Cork Park enclosure.

ManagersEdit

Managers in the Cork Championship are involved in the day-to-day running of the team, including the training, team selection, and sourcing of players. Their influence varies from club-to-club and is related to the individual club committees. The manager is assisted by a team of two or three selectors and a backroom team consisting of various coaches.

Winning managers
Manager Team Wins Winning years
Billy Morgan Nemo Rangers 11 1972, 1974, 1975, 1978, 1987, 1988, 2000, 2001, 2002
Ephie Fitzgerald Nemo Rangers 4 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008
James McCarthy Castlehaven 2 2003, 2012
Paul O'Keeffe University College Cork
St. Finbarr's
1 2011, 2021
Paul O'Donovan Nemo Rangers 1 2019, 2020
Michael O'Donovan Clonakilty 2 1996
Des Cullinane University College Cork 1 1999
John Corcoran Carbery 1 2004
Haulie O'Neill Clonakilty 2 2009
Eddie Kirwan Nemo Rangers 1 2010
Finbarr Santry Castlehaven 1 2013
Michael O'Brien Ballincollig 1 2014
Steven O'Brien Nemo Rangers 1 2015
Ronan McCarthy Carbery Rangers 1 2016
Larry Kavanagh Nemo Rangers 1 2017
Ray Keane St. Finbarr's 1 2018

TrophyEdit

The winning team is presented with the Andy Scannell Cup. Andy Scannell, a teacher at Clondulane National School outside Fermoy, was a County Senior Football selector when Cork won the Sam Maguire in 1945. He was later Chairman of the North Cork Division before taking office as Cork County Chairman in the early '50s, and steered the county to All-Ireland hurling victory during his term.

Roll of honourEdit

# Team Winner Winning Years
1 Nemo Rangers 22 1972, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1983, 1987, 1988, 1993, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2015, 2017, 2019, 2020
2 Lees 12 1887, 1888, 1896, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1907, 1908, 1911, 1914, 1923, 1955
3 Macroom 10 1909, 1910, 1912, 1913, 1926, 1930, 1931, 1935, 1958, 1962
UCC 10 1920, 1927, 1928, 1960, 1963, 1964, 1969, 1973, 1999, 2011
St. Finbarr's 10 1956, 1957, 1959, 1976, 1979, 1980, 1982, 1985, 2018, 2021
6 Clonakilty 9 1939, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1946, 1947, 1952, 1996, 2009
7 Fermoy 7 1895, 1898, 1899, 1900, 1905, 1906, 1945
8 Nils 6 1894, 1901, 1915, 1917, 1924, 1925
Beara 6 1932, 1933, 1934, 1940, 1967, 1997
10 St. Nicholas 5 1938, 1941, 1954, 1965, 1966
Castlehaven 5 1989, 1994, 2003, 2012, 2013
12 Carbery 4 1937, 1968, 1971, 2004
Collins 4 1929, 1949, 1951, 1953
9 Duhallow 3 1936, 1990, 1991
15 Bantry Blues 2 1995, 1998
Imokilly 2 1984, 1986
Cobh 2 1918, 1919
Clondrohid 2 1891, 1892
Midleton 2 1889, 1890
20 O'Donovan Rossa 1 1992
Muskerry 1 1970
Avondhu 1 1961
Garda 1 1950
Millstreet 1 1948
Collegians 1 1916
Dohenys 1 1897
Dromtarriffe 1 1893
Ballincollig 1 2014
Carbery Rangers 1 2016

List of finalsEdit

Year Winner Score Opponent Score
2021 St. Finbarr's 0-14 Clonakilty 0-13
2020 Nemo Rangers 3-07 Castlehaven 0-13
2019 Nemo Rangers 2-08 Duhallow 0-10
2018 St. Finbarr's 3–14 Duhallow 2–14
2017[13] Nemo Rangers 0-14, 4-12 (R) St. Finbarr's 0-14, 3-13 (R)
2016[14] Carbery Rangers 1–15 Ballincollig 1–12
2015[15][16] Nemo Rangers 0–10, 1–10 (R) Castlehaven 0–10, 0–11 (R)
2014[17] Ballincollig 1–13 Carbery Rangers 1–10
2013[18] Castlehaven 0–16 Nemo Rangers 1–11
2012[19] Castlehaven 1–07 Duhallow 0–09
2011 UCC 1–12 Castlehaven 0–10
2010[20] Nemo Rangers 2-10 St. Finbarr's 1-08
2009 Clonakilty 1-13 St. Finbarr's 1-12
2008[21] Nemo Rangers 0-13 Douglas 0-05
2007[22] Nemo Rangers 0-12 Ilen Rovers 0-09
2006[23] Nemo Rangers 1-11 Dohenys 0-07
2005 Nemo Rangers 1-14 Muskerry 0-07
2004[24] Carbery 1-11 Bishopstown 0-07
2003 Castlehaven 1-09 Clonakilty 1-07
2002 Nemo Rangers 0-15 Bishopstown 1-07
2001 Nemo Rangers 1-14 Bantry Blues 0-06
2000 Nemo Rangers 1-14 Carbery 0-07
1999 UCC 1-11 Nemo Rangers 1-08
1998 Bantry Blues 0-17 Duhallow 2-06
1997 Beara 1-10 Castlehaven 1-07
1996 Clonakilty 1-09 UCC 0-10
1995 Bantry Blues 0-10 Muskerry 0-08
1994 Castlehaven 0-12 O'Donovan Rossa 0-10
1993 Nemo Rangers 0-13 St. Finbarr's 0-04
1992 O'Donovan Rossa 2-09 Nemo Rangers 0-10
1991 Duhallow 0-11 St. Finbarr's 0-10
1990 Duhallow 0-08 St. Finbarr's 0-06
1989 Castlehaven 0-09 St. Finbarr's 0-07
1988 Nemo Rangers 2-08 Duhallow 0-10
1987 Nemo Rangers 2-11 Imokilly 0-09
1986 Imokilly 2-04 St. Finbarr's 0-09
1985 St. Finbarr's 1-10 Clonakilty 0-09
1984 Imokilly 1-14 St. Finbarr's 2-07
1983 Nemo Rangers 4-12 Clonakilty 2-03
1982 St. Finbarr's 1-05 Duhallow 0-05
1981 Nemo Rangers 3-11 Bantry Blues 0-06
1980 St. Finbarr's 3-08 UCC 1-09
1979 St. Finbarr's 3-14 Castlehaven 2-07
1978 Nemo Rangers 1-09 St Michael's 1-03
1977 Nemo Rangers 1-08 St Michael's 1-03
1976 St. Finbarr's 1-10 St Michael's 1-07
1975 Nemo Rangers 4-12 Dohenys 0-07
1974 Nemo Rangers 2-08 Carbery 1-08
1973 UCC 3-08 Carbery 1-10
1972 Nemo Rangers 2-09 UCC 0-08
1971 Carbery 3-11 UCC 2-08
1970 Muskerry 3-10 Nemo Rangers 4-06
1969 UCC 0-09 St. Nicholas 0-08
1968 Carbery 1-09 Clonakilty 1-06
1967 Beara 2-05 UCC 0-07
1966 St. Nicholas 1-07 St. Finbarr's 1-06
1965 St. Nicholas 2-04 St. Finbarr's 0-06
1964 UCC 0-12 Carbery 1-06
1963 UCC 1-06 St. Nicholas 1-05
1962 Macroom 3-04 Muskerry 1-04
1961 Avondhu 1-07 Clonakilty 1-05
1960 UCC 1-07 Avondhu 0-09
1959 St. Finbarr's 1-05 Macroom 0-06
1958 Macroom 1-07 Avondhu 0-09
1957 St. Finbarr's 0-08 Lees 0-05
1956 St. Finbarr's 3-05 Millstreet 0-04
1955 Lees 3-04 Macroom 0-09
1954 St. Nicholas 2-11 Clonakilty 0-03
1953 Collins 1-08 UCC 1-04
1952 Clonakilty 1-04 Collins 0-04
1951 Collins 3-02 St. Nicholas 1-05
1950 Garda 3-07 St. Nicholas 2-05
1949 Collins 5-11 Macroom 0-01
1948 Millstreet 1-02 St. Vincent's 0-03
1947 Clonakilty 2-05 St. Nicholas 1-04
1946 Clonakilty 1-02 Fermoy 0-03
1945 Fermoy 0-06 Clonakilty 0-03
1944 Clonakilty 1-09 Fermoy 1-05
1943 Clonakilty 2-05 Fermoy 1-04
1942 Clonakilty 1-08 Fermoy 1-05
1941 St. Nicholas 1-08 Millstreet 1-05
1940 Beara 2-08 Millstreet 1-07
1939 Clonakilty 0-07 Beara 0-05
1938 St. Nicholas 2-01 Clonakilty 0-02
1937 Carbery 3-08 Duhallow West 1-01
1936 Duhallow West 2-05 Clonakilty 0-02
1935 Macroom 1-03 Clonakilty 1-02
1934 Beara 2-06 Clonakilty 2-03
1933 Beara 2-05 Clonakilty 0-04
1932 Beara 2-02 Clonakilty 1-01
1931 Macroom 2-06 Carbery 2-02
1930 Macroom 2-08 Na Deasunaigh 2-03
1929 Collins Macroom
1928 UCC 1-06 Duhallow United 0-02
1927 UCC 3-03 Macroom 1-00
1926 Macroom 1-01 UCC 0-02
1925 Nils 4-03 Macroom 0-02
1924 Nils 0-08 UCC 0-02
1923 Lees 0-03 Youghal 0-02
1922 No Championship
1921 No Championship
1920 UCC 5-04 Cobh 0-01
1919 Cobh 4-03 Youhal 1-00
1918 Cobh 0-03 Fermoy 0-01
1917 Nils 0-02 Lees 0-00
1916 10-03 Fermoy 0-01
1915 Nils 2-03 Fermoy 0-01
1914 Lees 2-05 Youghal 1-02
1913 Macroom 1-02 Fermoy 0-03
1912 Macroom 1-03 Fermoy 1-01
1911 Lees 2-04 Nils 0-01
1910 Macroom 5-06 Cobh 0-02
1909 Macroom 1-06 Bantry Blues 1-02
1908 Lees 2-08 Fermoy 0-06
1907 Lees 0-07 Macroom 1-02
1906 Fermoy 0-08 Carbery Rangers 0-00
1905 Fermoy Carbery Rangers
1904 Lees Fermoy
1903 Lees 1-07 Dohenys 0-02
1902 Lees 0-10 Kanturk 1-01
1901 Nils 0-08* Fermoy 0-04
1900 Fermoy 1-09 Kinsale 1-06
1899 Fermoy Nils
1898 Fermoy 0-01* Dohenys 0-02
1897 Dohenys 0-05 Kanturk 0-04
1896 Lees 0-03 Kanturk 0-00
1895 Fermoy 0-06 Nils 0-01
1894 Nils 1-13 Kinsale Black & Whites 0-01
1893 Dromtarriffe 0-05 Castlemartyr 0-03
1892 Clondrohid 1-04 Kilmurry 0-01
1891 Clondrohid 3-05 Nils 0-02
1890 Midleton 2-03 Dromtarriffe 0-02
1889 Midleton 1-00 Macroom 0-01
1888 Lees 0-03 Dromtarriffe 0-01
1887 Lees 0-04 Lisgoold 0-01

NotesEdit

  • The following finals were drawn: 1901, 1944, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1957, 1967, 1968, 1994, 1997, 1999, 2017
  • No scores known for 1899 and 1904
  • 1898 Objection and game awarded to Fermoy

Records and statisticsEdit

FinalEdit

TeamEdit

  • Most wins: 22:
    • Nemo Rangers (1972, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1983, 1987, 1988, 1993, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2015, 2017, 2019, 2020)
  • Most consecutive wins: 4:
  • Most appearances in a final: 26:
    • Nemo Rangers (1970, 1972, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1983, 1987, 1988, 1992, 1993, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2013, 2015, 2017, 2019, 2020)

TeamsEdit

By decadeEdit

The most successful team of each decade, judged by number of Cork Senior Football Championship titles, is as follows:

Successful defendingEdit

15 teams of the 29 who have won the championship have successfully defended the title. These are:

    • Nemo Rangers on 8 attempts out of 18 (1975, 1978, 1988, 2001, 2002, 2006, 2007, 2008)
    • Lees on 4 attempts out of 11 (1888, 1903, 1904, 1908)
    • Macroom on 3 attempts out of 9 (1910, 1913, 1931)
    • Clonakilty on 3 attempts out of 8 (1943, 1944, 1947)
    • Fermoy on 3 attempts out of 6 (1899, 1900, 1906)
    • University College Cork on 2 attempts out of 9 (1928, 1964)
    • St. Finbarr's on 2 attempts out of 7 (1957, 1980)
    • Beara on 2 attempts out of 5 (1932, 1934)
    • Nils on 1 attempt out of 5 (1925)
    • St. Nicholas' on 1 attempt out of 4 (1966)
    • Castlehaven on 1 attempt out of 4 (2013)
    • Duhallow on 1 attempt out of 2 (1991)
    • Cobh on 1 attempt out of 1 (1919)
    • Clondrohid on 1 attempt out of 1 (1892)
    • Midleton on 1 attempt out of 1 (1890)

GapsEdit

Top scorersEdit

All timeEdit

As of match played 28 November 2021.
Rank Name Team Goals Points Total
1 Donncha O'Connor Duhallow 17 324 375
2 John Hayes Carbery / Carbery Rangers 19 287 344
3 Colin Corkery Nemo Rangers 14 271 313
4 Dinny Allen Nemo Rangers 30 184 274
5 James Masters Nemo Rangers 13 228 267
6 Steven Sherlock St. Finbarr's 12 215 251
7 Mark Collins Castlehaven 12 209 245
8 Paul Kerrigan Nemo Rangers 19 186 243
Brian Hurley Castlehaven 18 189 243
10 Luke Connolly Nemo Rangers 24 170 242
11 John Cleary Castlehaven 6 215 233
12 Kevin O'Sullivan Ilen Rovers / Carbery 10 188 218
13 Mícheál Ó Cróinín Naomh Abán / UCC 10 171 201

By yearEdit

Year Top scorer Team Score Total
1992 Mick McCarthy O'Donovan Rossa 3-26 35
1993 Colin Corkery Nemo Rangers 4-36 48
1994 Mick McCarthy O'Donovan Rossa 0-29 29
1995 Jonathan McCarthy Muskerry 0-24 24
1996 Colin Corkery Nemo Rangers 0-21 21
1997 Ciarán O'Sullivan Beara 1-24 27
1998 Mark O'Sullivan Duhallow 5-20 35
1999 Podsie O'Mahony Ballincollig 1-34 37
2000 Paul Holland Clyda Rovers 2-40 46
2001 Philip Clifford Bantry Blues 7-13 34
2002 Colin Corkery Nemo Rangers 2-33 39
2003 Jurgen Werner O'Donovan Rossa 0-33 33
2004 Fionán Murray St. Finbarr's 1-30 33
2005 James Masters Nemo Rangers 2-40 46
2006 James Masters Nemo Rangers 2-40 46
2007 James Masters Nemo Rangers 2-29 35
2008 James Masters Nemo Rangers 1-30 33
2009 Donncha O'Connor Duhallow 3-19 28
2010 Donncha O'Connor Duhallow 0-30 30
2011 Cian O'Riordan Avondhu 1-27 30
2012 Donncha O'Connor Duhallow 0-48 48
2013 Brian Hurley Castlehaven 3-47 56
2014 John Hayes Carbery Rangers 5-28 43
2015 Paul Kerrigan Nemo Rangers 4-22 34
2016 Cian Dorgan Ballincollig 2-31 37
2017 Steven Sherlock St. Finbarr's 2-48 54
2018 Steven Sherlock St. Finbarr's 3-37 46
Mark Collins Castlehaven 0-46
2019 John Hayes Carbery Rangers 2-20 26
2020 Steven Sherlock St. Finbarr's 3-36 45
2021 Steven Sherlock St. Finbarr's 3-41 50

In a single gameEdit

Year Top scorer Team Score Total
2014 Jason Sexton St. Finbarr's 3-04 13
2015 Paul Kerrigan Nemo Rangers 3-03 12
2016 Kevin O'Sullivan Ilen Rovers 3-06 15
2017 Mark Sugrue Carbery 2-08 14
2018 Seán O'Sullivan Kiskeam 1-11 14
Kevin Davis O'Donovan Rossa
2019 Steven Sherlock St. Finbarr's 2-16 22
2020 Steven Sherlock St. Finbarr's 1-11 14
2021 Steven Sherlock St. Finbarr's 2-10 16

In finalsEdit

Final Top scorer Team Score Total
1995 Kevin Harrington Bantry Blues 0-04 4
Jonathan McCarthy Muskerry
1996 Terry Dillon Clonakilty 1-02 5
1997 Séamus Spencer Beara 1-03 6
1998 J. P. O'Neill Duhallow 2-01 7
1999 Colin Corkery (D) Nemo Rangers 0-06 6
Ian Twiss (R) UCC 1-03
2000 Alan Cronin Nemo Rangers 1-04 7
2001 Colin Corkery Nemo Rangers 0-10 10
2002 Colin Corkery Nemo Rangers 0-11 11
2003 Colin Crowley Castlehaven 1-04 7
2004 Jack Ferriter Bishopstown 0-04 4
2005 James Masters Nemo Rangers 0-06 6
2006 James Masters Nemo Rangers 1-06 9
2007 Paul Kerrigan Nemo Rangers 0-07 7
2008 Paul Kerrigan Nemo Rangers 0-05 5
2009 Fionán Murray St. Finbarr's 0-05 5
2010 Paul Kerrigan Nemo Rangers 1-03 6
2011 Daithí Casey UCC 1-04 7
2012 Donncha O'Connor Duhallow 0-04 4
2013 Brian Hurley Castlehaven 0-12 12
2014 Cian Dorgan Ballincollig 0-06 6
2015 Brian Hurley (D) Castlehaven 0-04 4
Paul Kerrigan (R) Nemo Rangers
Barry O'Driscoll (R) Nemo Rangers 1-01
2016 Cian Dorgan Ballincollig 1-07 10
2017 Steven Sherlock (D) St. Finbarr's 0-08 8
Steven Sherlock (R) St. Finbarr's 2-07 13
2018 Steven Sherlock St. Finbarr's 1-08 11
2019 Luke Connolly Nemo Rangers 2-04 10
2020 Brian Hurley Castlehaven 0-08 8
2021 Steven Sherlock St. Finbarr's 0-07 7

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The Founding of Cork County Board". Cork GAA website. Retrieved 11 September 2020.
  2. ^ "The Early Years". Bride Rovers GAA website. Retrieved 11 September 2020.
  3. ^ "Club History Dromtarriffe GAA". Dromtarriffe GAA website. Retrieved 29 August 2020.
  4. ^ "Bride Rovers GAA". East Cork GAA website. 8 June 2020. Retrieved 29 August 2020.
  5. ^ "History". Midleton GAA website. Retrieved 11 September 2020.
  6. ^ Duggan, Keith (5 July 2014). "'De Park' – Cork's oval-shaped coliseum on the banks of the Lee". Irish Times. Retrieved 10 November 2017.
  7. ^ Woods, Mark (26 August 2020). "UCC have their critics but proved again what they add to the Cork championships". The Echo. Retrieved 30 August 2020.
  8. ^ Moran, Seán (22 November 2019). "Divisions remain in Cork and are welcomed in Kerry". Irish Times. Retrieved 30 August 2020.
  9. ^ Cormican, Eoghan (26 March 2019). "Here's a breakdown of the proposals to restructure the Cork county championships". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  10. ^ "Cork clubs vote down radical restructuring proposals". RTÉ Sport. 2 April 2019. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  11. ^ O'Connor, Colm (21 July 2020). "Bon Secours Hospital Cork to sponsor football championships". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 27 July 2020.
  12. ^ Horgan, John (28 July 2019). "Work on the new pitch at Páirc Uí Chaoimh is underway to take advantage of summer growth". Evening Echo. Retrieved 9 October 2019.
  13. ^ "Nemo nous steers them to thrilling 20th Cork title". Irish Examiner. 23 October 2017. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  14. ^ "Magnificent Carbery Rangers enjoy finest hour". Irish Examiner. 17 October 2016. Retrieved 17 October 2016.
  15. ^ "Castlehaven frustrated after Mark Collins 'point' denied". Irish Examiner. 19 October 2015. Retrieved 20 October 2015.
  16. ^ "19th Cork title for Nemo Rangers is one of the sweetest". Irish Examiner. 26 October 2015. Retrieved 27 October 2015.
  17. ^ "Epic turnaround gives Ballincollig their first title". Irish Independent. 20 October 2014. Retrieved 20 October 2014.
  18. ^ "Hurley's heroics herald defiant Haven response". Irish Examiner. 14 October 2013. Retrieved 14 October 2013.
  19. ^ "Nolan the hero as Castlehaven dig deep for glorious fourth title". Irish Examiner. 29 October 2012. Retrieved 30 October 2012.
  20. ^ "Kerrigan helps Nemo return to top of the pile". Irish Times. 25 October 2010. Archived from the original on 4 August 2012. Retrieved 26 October 2010.
  21. ^ "Four-in-a-row joy for Nemo". Irish Examiner. 6 October 2006. Retrieved 4 December 2013.
  22. ^ "Nemo dig deep to find edge against minnows". Irish Independent. 29 October 2007. Retrieved 2 December 2013.
  23. ^ "Gift goal puts Nemo on road to glory". Irish Examiner. 30 October 2006. Retrieved 4 December 2013.
  24. ^ "Carbery end long famine in fine style". Irish Independent. 18 October 2004. Retrieved 2 December 2013.

External linksEdit