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Commonwealth of Independent States Cup

CIS Cup logo.

The Commonwealth of Independent States Cup (Russian: Кубок чемпионов Содружества, Кубок Содружества, Кубок чемпионов содружества стран СНГ и Балтии) is a defunct[1] annual regional association football tournament, recognized by FIFA.[2][3]

The tournament was initially established for football clubs of the former Soviet Union republics in 1993 (a year later since the collapse). On several occasions, some national football organizations of the former Soviet republics as well as individual clubs refused participation in the tournament for different reasons. Usually the invitation was sent to the best clubs of the Commonwealth of Independent States member states, as well as Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, i.e. either a champion or a runner-up, while in the later editions the Cup (before 2012) saw participation of clubs from Serbia and Finland.

In 2012, the CIS Cup became a competition of national youth teams. Previously only the Russia under-21 team competed in the competition.

The competition was disestablished in 2016.[1]

HistoryEdit

The Commonwealth of Independent States Cup started in 1993 as an open tournament to champions from the USSR successor states (The Commonwealth of Independent States, and well as Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania).

Ukraine boycotted the first two competitions, but joined in 1995.

In 19952006 the Russia national under-21 football team participated in the tournament as the 16th team, but in 2007 and 2008 Serbia replaced it as the 17th nation sending a team to play in it, and became the first non-former Soviet Union nation participating in the tournament. Unlike the rest of the states, who send their latest champions to play in the tournament, Serbia has sent OFK Beograd to play in the tournament.

 
Sheriff Tiraspol with the 2009 CIS Cup title.

In its first years the tournament was popular in the territories of the former Soviet Union, including the most titled teams from the old Soviet Top League. Spartak Moscow from Russia, and Dynamo Kyiv from Ukraine each won the cup several times but, after less than a decade, the teams from Russia and Ukraine became hesitant to send their best players to play on the artificial turf at the Olympic Stadium, so they sent their reserve players instead[4][5][6] or sometimes the league runners-up participated in their place. This resulted in the decrease of the tournament's popularity in those states particularly and in the international value of the tournament overall.

In 2006 a new tournament, Channel One Cup, started and caught the attention of the Russian and Ukrainian teams, which even more decreased the popularity of the Commonwealth of Independent States Cup tournament.

A big scandal occurred in 2006, when the Armenian champion FC Pyunik refused to play the Azerbaijani team, PFC Neftchi due to the collapse of diplomatic relations between the two countries' governments at that time around the Nagorno-Karabakh War. FC Pyunik defeated Ukrainian team FC Shakhtar Donetsk 3–1 in the quarter-final, earning a place in the semi-final against PFC Neftchi. However, FC Pyunik announced that they would no play against an Azerbaijani team, and flew home from Moscow the same evening. The Russian Football Union gave FC Shakhtar Donetsk a technical victory 3–0 so they could play in the semi-final instead of FC Pyunik, but FC Shakhtar Donetsk declined the offer stating that "...we would really want to play in the semi-final, but we don't want to get there by any other way than sport". Eventually, PFC Neftchi were given a bye to the final, where they defeated the Lithuanian club FBK Kaunas 4–2.[7]

In 2007 talks began about changing the format of the cup, and uniting it with the Channel One Cup in order to bring back the interest of the Russian and Ukrainian teams,[8] and in 2007 its games were even visited by representatives from FIFA,[9] but nevertheless, nothing came out from those talks and efforts.

In October 2009, Bunyodkor coach Luis Felipe Scolari announced that his Uzbek side would not enter the 2010 tournament due to focusing on the Asian Champions League.[10]

FinalsEdit

Competition among junior squads of national teamsEdit

Season Winner Score Runner-up Venue
2016
Details
  Russia 4 – 2   Moldova SCC Peterburgsky,
Saint Petersburg  
2015
Details
  South Africa 2 – 1   Finland SCC Peterburgsky,
Saint Petersburg  
2014
Details
  Ukraine 4 – 0   Russia SCC Peterburgsky,
Saint Petersburg  
2013
Details
  Russia 4 – 2   Ukraine SCC Peterburgsky,
Saint Petersburg  
2012
Details
  Russia 2 – 0   Belarus SCC Peterburgsky,
Saint Petersburg  

Club competitionsEdit

Season Winner Score Runner-up Venue
2011
Details
  Inter Baku 0 – 0
6 – 5 on penalties
  Shakhtyor Soligorsk SCC Peterburgsky,
Saint Petersburg  
2010
Details
  FK Rubin Kazan 5 – 2   FC Aktobe Olympic Stadium,
Moscow  
2009
Details
  FC Sheriff Tiraspol 0 – 0
5 – 4 on penalties
  FC Aktobe Olympic Stadium,
Moscow  
2008
Details
  Khazar Lenkoran 4 – 3   Pakhtakor Tashkent SCC Peterburgsky,
Saint Petersburg  
2007
Details
  Pakhtakor Tashkent 0 – 0
9 – 8 on penalties
  FK Ventspils Olympic Stadium,
Moscow  
2006
Details
  Neftchi Baku 4 – 2   FBK Kaunas Olympic Stadium,
Moscow  
2005
Details
  Lokomotiv Moscow 2 – 1   Neftchi Baku Dynamo Manage,
Moscow  
2004
Details
  Dinamo Tbilisi 3 – 1   Skonto Riga Olympic Stadium,
Moscow  
2003
Details
  Sheriff Tiraspol 2 – 1   Skonto Riga Olympic Stadium,
Moscow  
2002
Details
  Dynamo Kyiv 4 – 3   Spartak Moscow Olympic Stadium,
Moscow  
2001
Details
  Spartak Moscow 2 – 1 aet   Skonto Riga Olympic Stadium,
Moscow  
2000
Details
  Spartak Moscow 3 – 0   Zimbru Chişinău Olympic Stadium,
Moscow  
1999
Details
  Spartak Moscow 2 – 1   Dynamo Kyiv Olympic Stadium,
Moscow  
1998
Details
  Dynamo Kyiv 1 – 0   Spartak Moscow LFK CSKA,
Moscow  
1997
Details
  Dynamo Kyiv 3 – 2   Spartak Moscow LFK CSKA,
Moscow  
1996
Details
  Dynamo Kyiv 1 – 0   Alania Vladikavkaz LFK CSKA,
Moscow  
1995
Details
  Spartak Moscow 5 – 1   Dinamo Tbilisi LFK CSKA,
Moscow  
1994
Details
  Spartak Moscow 7 – 0   Neftchi Fergana Olympic Stadium,
Moscow  
1993
Details
  Spartak Moscow 8 – 0   Belarus Minsk LFK CSKA,
Moscow  

All-time top scorersEdit

Top scorers by yearEdit

Rank Player Goals
1993 Shota Arveladze (FC Dinamo Tbilisi)   5[12]
1994 Vladimir Beschastnykh (FC Spartak Moskva)   10[13]
1995 Ilia Tsymbalar (FC Spartak Moskva)   6[14]
1996 Uladzimir Makowski (FC Dinamo Minsk)   5[15]
1997 Andrey Tikhonov (Spartak Moscow)  , Andriy Shevchenko (Dinamo Kiev)   6[16]
1998 Anatoliy Kanischev (Spartak Moscow)   8[17]
1999 Mihails Miholaps (Skonto Riga)   7[18]
2000 Vladimirs Koļesņičenko (Skonto Riga)  , Luis Robson (Spartak Moscow)  , Yegor Titov (Spartak Moscow)   5[19]
2001 Mikheil Ashvetia (FC Torpedo Kutaisi)  , Jafar Irismetov (Spartak Moscow)  , Marcão (Spartak Moscow)  , Valery Strypeykis (FC Slavia Mozyr)  , Raman Vasilyuk (FC Slavia Mozyr)   4[20]
2002 Vladimir Beschastnykh (Spartak Moscow)   7[21]
2003 Cristian Tudor (Sheriff Tiraspol)   9[22]
2004 Vitaly Daraselia Jr. (FC Dinamo Tbilisi)   6[23]
2005 Giorgi Adamia (Neftchi Baku)   6[24]
2006 Evhen Seleznyov (FC Shakhtar Donetsk)   5[25]
2007 Server Djeperov (FC Pakhtakor Tashkent)  , Vitali Rodionov (BATE Borisov)   4[26]
2008 Uladzimir Yurchanka (Zenit Saint Petersburg)   4[27]
2009 Ibrahim Rabimov (Regar-TadAZ Tursunzoda)  , Vīts Rimkus (FK Ventspils)  , Alexandr Erokhin (Sheriff Tiraspol)   4[28]
2010 Emil Kenzhesariev (FC Aktobe)   6[29]
2011 Ģirts Karlsons (FC Inter Baku)   6[30]
2012 Sardar Azmoun (Iran U20)   8[31]
2013 Andrei Panyukov (Russia U21)   6[32]
2014 Roman Murtazaev (Kazakhstan U21)  , Ruslan Bolov (Russia U21)  , Abdurasul Rakhmonov (Tajikistan U21)   5[33]

Performances by teamEdit

Performances by country the clubs came fromEdit

Country Titles Runners-up
  Russia 11 5
  Ukraine 5 2
  Azerbaijan 3 1
  Moldova 2 2
  Uzbekistan 1 2
  Georgia 1 1
  South Africa 1
  Latvia 4
  Belarus 3
  Kazakhstan 2
  Lithuania 1
  Finland 1

RecordsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b rus.DELFI.lv (24 July 2016). "Мутко заявил о закрытии Кубка Содружества по футболу". delfi.lv. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  2. ^ Немножко мертвый — Футбол на Soccer.ru (rus.) Archived 2011-10-19 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Взгляд. Хотели "Динамо"? Получите! (rus.)
  4. ^ "Газзаев доволен игрой дублеров ЦСКА на Кубке Содружества". NEWSru.com. 18 January 2006. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  5. ^ (in Russian) На Кубок чемпионов содружества стран СНГ и Балтии может выйти дубль «Зенита» – Новости Санкт-Петербурга – Фонтанка.Ру
  6. ^ ""Шахтер" все-таки приедет на Кубок Содружества". NEWSru.com. 20 November 2005. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  7. ^ "Скандал на Кубке Содружества: чемпионы Армении отказались играть с азербайджанцами". NEWSru.com. 19 January 2006. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  8. ^ "Виталий Мутко намерен реформировать Кубок Содружества". NEWSru.com. 19 March 2007. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  9. ^ "На открытие Кубка Содружества приедут Блаттер и Платини". NEWSru.com. 25 December 2006. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  10. ^ http://www.the-afc.com/en/afc-champions-league-2009/25791-scolari-skips-cis-cup-to-focus-on-acl Scolari skips CIS Cup to focus on ACL
  11. ^ a b c d "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup - Trivia". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  12. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 1993". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  13. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 1994". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  14. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 1995". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  15. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 1996". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  16. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 1997". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  17. ^ a b "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 1998". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  18. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 1999". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  19. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2000". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  20. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2001". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  21. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2002". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  22. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2003". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  23. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2004". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  24. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2005". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  25. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2006". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  26. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2007". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  27. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2008". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  28. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2009". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  29. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2010". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  30. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2011". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  31. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2012". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  32. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2013". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  33. ^ "Commonwealth of Independent States Cup 2014". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.

External linksEdit