Columbia Law Review

The Columbia Law Review is a law review edited and published by students at Columbia Law School. The journal publishes scholarly articles, essays, and student notes.

Columbia Law Review
DisciplineJurisprudence
LanguageEnglish
Edited byTaoxin Wang [1]
Publication details
History1901–present
Publisher
Columbia Law Review Association, Inc.[2] (United States)
Frequency8/year
2.224 (2018)
Standard abbreviations
BluebookColum. L. Rev.
ISO 4Columbia Law Rev.
Indexing
CODENCOLRAO
ISSN0010-1958
LCCN29-10105
JSTOR00101958
OCLC no.01564231
Links

It was established in 1901 by Joseph E. Corrigan and John M. Woolsey, who served as the review's first editor-in-chief and secretary. The Columbia Law Review is one of four law reviews that publishes the Bluebook.

HistoryEdit

The Columbia Law Review represents the school's third attempt at a student-run law periodical. In 1885, the Columbia Jurist was founded by a group of six students but ceased publication in 1887.[3] Despite its short run, the Jurist is credited with partially inspiring the creation of the Harvard Law Review, which began publication a short time later.[4]

The second journal, the Columbia Law Times was founded in 1887 and closed down in 1893 due to lack of revenue.[5]

Publication of the current Columbia Law Review began in 1901,[6] making it the fifth oldest surviving law review in the US. Dean William Keener took an active involvement during its founding to help ensure its longevity.[7]

ImpactEdit

The Columbia Law Review was the top-cited law journal during the 2018 Supreme Court term.[8]

According to the Journal Citation Reports the Columbia Law Review had a 2009 impact factor of 3.610, ranking it third out of 116 journals in the category "Law".[9] In 2007 the Columbia Law Review ranked second for submissions and citations within the legal academic community, after Harvard Law Review.[10]

Notable alumniEdit

Notable alumni of the Columbia Law Review include:

Past Editors-in-ChiefEdit

Past Review Editors-in-Chief (1990-2021) [11]
Year Name
2020-2021 Oluwatumise Asebiomo[12]
2019-2020 Mary Marshall
2018-2019 Tomi O. Williams[13]
2017-2018 Kelsey A. Ruescher [14]
2016-2017 Daniela Dekhtyar [15]
2015-2016 Krystina L. Ho [16]
2014-2015 Dennis Fan [17]
2013-2014 Angela A. Sun [18]
2012-2013 Liliana Zaragoza [19]
2011-2012 Maren Hulden [20]
2010-2011 Farhang Heydari [21]
2009-2010 Devi M. Rao [22]
2008-2009 Z. W. Julius Chen [23]
2007-2008 Karin S. Portlock [24]
2006-2007 Grant R. Mainland [25]
2005-2006 Young K. Lee [26]
2004-2005 Richard A. Kaplan [27]
2003-2004 Elizabeth M. Evenson [28]
2002-2003 Pankaj Venugopal [29]
2001-2002 Margaret L. Taylor [30]
2000-2001 Joellen R. Valentine [31]
1999-2000 Bryan R. Diederich [32]
1998-1999 Lawrence Wu [33]
1997-1998 Joshua Waldman [34]
1996-1997 William Savitt [35]
1995-1996 Geoffrey B. Goldman [36]
1994-1995 Susan Stayn [37]
1993-1994 Joseph P. Liu [38]
1992-1993 Elizabeth L. Earle [39]
1991-1992 Daniel P. Penn [40]
1990-1991 Nancy L. Sanborn [41]

Notable articlesEdit

[according to whom?]

  • Cohen, Felix S. (1935). "Transcendental Nonsense and the Functional Approach". Columbia Law Review. 35 (6): 809–849. doi:10.2307/1116300. JSTOR 1116300.
  • Fuller, Lon L. (1941). "Consideration and Form". Columbia Law Review. 41 (5): 799–824. doi:10.2307/1117840. JSTOR 1117840.
  • Frankfurter, Felix (1947). "Some Reflections on the Reading of Statutes". Columbia Law Review. 47 (4): 527–546. doi:10.2307/1118049. JSTOR 1118049. S2CID 158802030.
  • Hart, Henry M. (1954). "The Relations Between State and Federal Law". Columbia Law Review. 54 (4): 489–542. doi:10.2307/1119546. JSTOR 1119546.
  • Wechsler, Herbert (1954). "The Political Safeguards of Federalism: The Role of the States in the Composition and Selection of the National Government". Columbia Law Review. 54 (4): 543–560. doi:10.2307/1119547. JSTOR 1119547.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2021-2022 ANNOUNCEMENTS 2021-2022/".
  2. ^ "Columbia Law Review on JSTOR". www.jstor.org. Retrieved August 23, 2018.
  3. ^ Swygert, Michael; Bruce, Jon (1985). "The Historical Origins, Founding, and Early Development of Student-Edited Law Reviews". Hastings Law Journal. 36 (5): 739. ISSN 0017-8322.
  4. ^ Association (1886- ), Harvard Law School; School, Harvard Law (1918). The Centennial History of the Harvard Law School, 1817-1917. Harvard law school association. p. 139.
  5. ^ Swygert & Bruce 1985, p. 782.
  6. ^ "About the Review". Columbia Law Review.
  7. ^ Swygert & Bruce 1985, p. 783.
  8. ^ "Empirical SCOTUS: What the justices cited in OT 2018". SCOTUSblog. July 24, 2019.
  9. ^ "Web of Science". 2011. Retrieved June 26, 2011.
  10. ^ "Law Journals: Submissions and Ranking". Archived from the original on May 8, 2006. Retrieved January 15, 2007.
  11. ^ "Archived Mastheads". Columbia Law Review. Columbia Law Review. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  12. ^ "Meet 'Columbia Law Review' Editor in Chief Oluwatumise Asebiomo '21". www.law.columbia.edu. Retrieved March 16, 2021.
  13. ^ Review, Columbia Law. "Announcements 2018–2019". Columbia Law Review. Retrieved July 29, 2019.
  14. ^ "Announcements 2017–2018".
  15. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 116 (6). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  16. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 115 (6). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  17. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  18. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  19. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  20. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  21. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  22. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 110 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  23. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 109 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  24. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 108 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  25. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 107 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  26. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 106 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  27. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 105 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  28. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 104 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  29. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 103 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  30. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 102 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  31. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 101 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  32. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 100 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  33. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 99 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  34. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 98 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  35. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 97 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  36. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 96 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  37. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 95 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  38. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 94 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  39. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 93 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  40. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 92 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  41. ^ "Columbia Law Review" (PDF). Columbia Law Review. 91 (1). Retrieved February 5, 2018.

External linksEdit