Choma, Zambia

Choma is a town that serves as the capital of the Southern Province of Zambia. It is also the capital of Choma District, one of the 15 administrative districts in the province.[2]

Choma
City
Choma.jpg
Official seal of Choma
Choma is located in Zambia
Choma
Choma
Location in Zambia
Coordinates: 16°46′16″S 26°59′32″E / 16.77111°S 26.99222°E / -16.77111; 26.99222Coordinates: 16°46′16″S 26°59′32″E / 16.77111°S 26.99222°E / -16.77111; 26.99222
CountryFlag of Zambia.svg Zambia
ProvinceSouthern Province
DistrictChoma District
Elevation
4,386 ft (1,337 m)
Population
 (2010 Census)[1]
 • Total51,842

LocationEdit

Choma lies on the Lusaka–Livingstone Road, approximately 292 kilometres (181 mi) south-west of Lusaka, the national capital and largest city in Zambia.[3] This is approximately 194 kilometres (121 mi), by road, northeast of Livingstone, the largest city in Zambia's Southern Province.[4] The geographical coordinates of Choma are:16°46'16.0"S, 26°59'32.0"E (Latitude:-16.771111; Longitude:26.992222).[5] Choma sits at an average elevation of 1,337 metres (4,386 ft) above mean sea level.[6]

PopulationEdit

In 1990, the population of Choma was 30,143. In 2000, there were 40,405 people. The 2010 population census and household survey enumerated the population of the town at 51,842 inhabitants.[7] The table below illustrates the same data.

Historical population
YearPop.±%
199030,143—    
200040,405+34.0%
201051,842+28.3%
source:[7]

OverviewEdit

Choma Town is home to a museum dedicated to the cultural heritage of the Tonga people of southern Zambia. The Nkanga River Conservation Area lies approximately 25 kilometres (16 mi) from Choma town.[1]

EducationEdit

Choma has a range of both state-funded and private schools. Some of the state funded schools include: 1. Choma Day Secondary School, a mission school 2. Choma Secondary School, another mission school 3. Chuundu Day Secondary School 4. Batoka Secondary School 5. Masuku Secondary School, a mission school 6. Macha Girls' Secondary School, another mission school 7. Njase Girls' Secondary School, a mission school 8. St. Mark's Boys' Secondary School, a mission school 9. Swan Comprehensive School 10. St. Frances Davidson Day Secondary School, a mission school and 11.St Mulumba's Special School, named after the Ugandan Saint Matiya Mulumba.[8]

In 2016, the Government of Zambia indicated intentions to construct a public university in Choma, once suitable land is located.[9]

Other considerationsEdit

NightlifeEdit

Choma is home to a number of bars and nightclubs including Club Leelove; DC Nitght Club[10] and Choma Hotel & Bar[11] These establishments have hosted notable Zambian artists including Macky 2, Petersen Zagaze and Mampi.[12]

FoodEdit

Choma has a variety of restaurants, cafes and street food stalls in Choma, including Wonderbake,[13] Debonair's Pizza, Rachael's Lodge, and PMB Snacklite, within the gardens of Choma Museum. The main market, Makalanguzu, also sells ingredients and traditional street food, including fish, grains, tobacco leaves and roasted corn.[14]

International presenceEdit

From 2012 to 2017,[15] Choma hosted successive teams of Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO) youth volunteers working in the areas of health, education and environment.[16][17]

Notable residentsEdit

Some of the notable residents include the following: 1. Gilbert Choombe, an Olympic boxer 2. Emmanuel Zulu, and 3. Spencer Sautu, a soccer player who plays for the Choma-based Green Eagles F.C.[18]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Central Statistical Office Zambia and City Population (14 July 2019). "Population of Zambian Cities and Urban Centres: Choma". Citypopulation.de. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  2. ^ Zambia Tourism (30 May 2020). "About Choma, Zambia". Lusaka: Zambiatourism.com. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  3. ^ Google (30 May 2020). "Road Distance Between Lusaka, Zambia and Choma, Zambia" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  4. ^ Google (30 May 2020). "Distance Between Livingstone, Zambia and Choma, Zambia" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  5. ^ Google (30 May 2020). "Location of Choma Town, Choma District, Zambia" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  6. ^ Flood Map (30 May 2020). "Elevation of Choma, Zambia". Floodmap.net. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  7. ^ a b Central Statistical Office Zambia and City Population (14 July 2019). "Population of Zambian Cities and Urban Centres: Choma". Citypopulation.de. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  8. ^ Zambia Yellow Pages (30 May 2020). "Schools in Choma Town". Lusaka: Zambiayp.com. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  9. ^ Lusaka Times (12 January 2016). "Government to construct a University in Choma". Lusaka Times. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  10. ^ Zambian Eye (22 January 2014). "A Night at Choma's DC Night Club". Lusaka: Zambianeye.com. Archived from the original (Archived from the original on 22 August 2016) on 22 August 2016. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  11. ^ Zambian Eye (31 January 2014). "Visiting Choma Hotel". Lusaka: Zambianeye.com. Archived from the original on 22 August 2016. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  12. ^ Jimmy Chibuye (11 August 2018). "Mampi Finds Some Love". Zambia Daily Mail. Lusaka. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  13. ^ Chris McIntyre (5 July 2016). Zambia. Bradt. p. 210. ISBN 9781784770129.
  14. ^ Zambian Eye (24 April 2015). "Its unacceptable, the biggest market in Choma has no toilet – Aspiring MP". Lusaka: Zambianeye.com. Archived from the original (Archived from the original on 22 August 2016) on 22 August 2016. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  15. ^ Robert Cumber (9 August 2012). "Young people volunteering overseas win praise from MP". London, United Kingdom: Getwestlondon.co.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  16. ^ Megan Stacey (26 November 2013). "Megan's Unforgettable Zambian Experience". Rotherham, Yorkshire, United Kingdom: Rotherham Advertiser. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  17. ^ Chomba Musika (16 October 2014). "Choma Gets 24 Zambian/UK Youth Volunteers". Zambia Daily Mail. Lusaka. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  18. ^ Lucky Mwewa Chama (21 January 2019). "Opinion: Will The Eagles Continue To Soar High?". Lusaka: Zambianfootball.co.zm. Retrieved 30 May 2020.

External linksEdit