Chechens in Jordan

Chechens of Jordan are Chechens who have inhabited Jordan since the expulsion of Caucasians in the 19th century.[2] Chechens have played an important role in the foundation of Jordan as a modern state.

Chechens in Jordan
Total population
12,000–30,000[1]
Languages
Chechen, Jordanian Arabic
Religion
Islam
Related ethnic groups
Chechens, Chechens in Syria, Ingush, Kists

HistoryEdit

ExpulsionEdit

In the second half of the 19th century the Russian Empire was fighting the peoples of the Caucasus in an expansionist war, known as the Caucasian war.[3] One of the outcomes of the war was that many native peoples of the Caucasus were forcefully expelled to the Ottoman Empire. An estimated 5,000 Chechen families were expelled to the Ottoman Empire.[4] In March 1903, the Ottoman authorities sent the first 700 Chechen families to the region of Transjordan. The Chechens settlers chose to settle non-populated areas most suitable for agriculture and close to water sources. So they founded the city of Zarqa, Jordan's second biggest city.[5]

Foundation of the Emirate of TransjordanEdit

In October 1920, after establishing the Emirate of Transjordan the United Kingdom mobilized a "mobile force" under the command of Captain Frederick Gerard Peake, to defend the territory against both internal and external threats. The Mobile Force was based in Zarqa. 80% of its men were drawn from the local Chechen community.[6]

Military and political representationEdit

Chechens are heavily represented in the Jordanian armed forces, and intelligence apparatus since the foundation of the Emirate of Transjordan.[7]

Chechens and Circassians are mandated 3 seats in the Jordanian house of representatives,[8] currently two of those seats are held by Chechens.[citation needed]

OrganizationsEdit

  • The largest Chechen organization in Jordan is the Chechen Charity Society, founded in 1958. The headquarters of the company is located in the city of Zarqa. The society has branches in places where significant numbers of Chechens live.[9]
  • The sports club Caucasus was founded in 1932 by Chechens from Zarqa,[10] and has made a significant contribution to the develop football, table tennis, handball, and swimming in Jordan.[11]
  • In 1981, the Women’s Chechen Charity Society was established, the organization is active among the Chechen community and holds regular cultural and charitable events.[11]

Notable Chechens from JordanEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Jordan willing to assist Chechnya - King".
  2. ^ "War 'back home' divides Jordan's Chechen community". The Japan Times.
  3. ^ King, Charles (2008). The ghost of freedom : a history of the Caucasus. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-517775-6. OCLC 171614379.
  4. ^ Jersild, Austin. Orientalism and empire : North Caucasus mountain peoples and the Georgian frontier, 1845-1917. Montreal. p. 24. ISBN 978-0-7735-6996-6. OCLC 123470225.
  5. ^ Гарсаев (2019). Чеченские мухаджиры и их потомки в истории и культуре Иордании. p. 85.
  6. ^ Pike, John. "The Chechen Chronicles '98'". Globalsecurity.org.
  7. ^ Гарсаев (2019). Чеченские мухаджиры и их потомки в истории и культуре Иордании. p. 124.
  8. ^ "MIDDLE EAST: JORDAN". cia.gov.
  9. ^ Гарсаев (2019). Чеченские мухаджиры и их потомки в истории и культуре Иордании. p. 38.
  10. ^ Гарсаев (2019). Чеченские мухаджиры и их потомки в истории и культуре Иордании. p. 90.
  11. ^ a b Гарсаев (2019). Чеченские мухаджиры и их потомки в истории и культуре Иордании. p. 299.