Open main menu

Charles Joseph Kersten (May 26, 1902 – October 31, 1972) was a U.S. Representative from Wisconsin.[1]

Charles J. Kersten
CharlesJKersten.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wisconsin's 5th district
In office
January 3, 1951 – January 3, 1955
Preceded byAndrew Biemiller
Succeeded byHenry S. Reuss
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wisconsin's 5th district
In office
January 3, 1947 – January 3, 1949
Preceded byAndrew Biemiller
Succeeded byAndrew Biemiller
Personal details
Born(1902-05-26)May 26, 1902
Chicago, Illinois
DiedOctober 31, 1972(1972-10-31) (aged 70)
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Political partyRepublican

Born in Chicago, Illinois, Kersten graduated from Marquette University College of Law, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1925 and was admitted to the bar the same year. He commenced the practice of law in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1928, serving as first assistant district attorney of Milwaukee County from 1937-1943 under District Attorney Herbert Steffes.

Kersten was elected as a Republican to the Eightieth Congress (January 3, 1947 – January 3, 1949) as the representative of Wisconsin's 5th congressional district. He was a close friend of fellow freshman Congressman Richard Nixon. He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1948 to the Eighty-first Congress.

Kersten was elected to the Eighty-second and Eighty-third Congresses (January 3, 1951 – January 3, 1955) once again representing Wisconsin's 5th district. He served as chairman of the United States House Select Committee to Investigate Communist Aggression and the Forced Incorporation of the Baltic States into the U.S.S.R. during the Eighty-third Congress. He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1954, and failed in his bid for renomination in 1956, as of 2018 making him the last Republican to represent Milwaukee in the U.S. Congress. In between these campaigns Kersten briefly served in the Eisenhower administration under Nelson Rockefeller as White House consultant on psychological warfare (1955–1956). He then resumed his law practice, remaining active in anticommunist circles until his death on October 31, 1972, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He was interred in Holy Cross Cemetery.

SourcesEdit

  1. ^ 'Wisconsin Blue Book 1954,' Biographical Sketch of Charles J. Kersten, pg. 17
  • United States Congress. "Charles J. Kersten (id: K000150)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

External linksEdit