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The Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) is a branch of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that regulates the manufacture and distribution of food, food additives, and drugs that will be given to animals. These include animals from which human foods are derived, as well as food additives and drugs for pets or companion animals. CVM is responsible for regulating drugs, devices, and food additives given to, or used on, over one hundred million companion animals, plus millions of poultry, cattle, swine, and minor animal species. Minor animal species include animals other than cattle, swine, chickens, turkeys, horses, dogs, and cats.

Center for Veterinary Medicine
Center for Veterinary Medicine logo.png
Agency overview
Agency executive
  • Steven Solomon, DVM, Director
Parent agencyFood and Drug Administration
Websitewww.fda.gov/animal-veterinary

CVM monitors the safety of animal foods and medications. Much of the center's work focuses on animal medications used in food animals to ensure that significant drug residues are not present in the meat or other products from these animals.

Dr. Steven Solomon, DVM, is currently the Director of CVM.[1] He succeeded Tracey Forfa, who had been acting director for a few months.[2] The previous director was Dr. Bernadette Dunham; she served as Director from 2008–2016.[2]

CVM does not regulate vaccines for animals; these are handled by the United States Department of Agriculture[3]

The Bureau of Veterinary Medicine was set up by the FDA in 1965.[4] It was renamed as the Center for Veterinary Medicine in 1984.[4]

SourcesEdit

  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Commissioner, Office of the. "FDA Organization - Meet Dr. Steven Solomon, Director, Center for Veterinary Medicine". www.fda.gov. Retrieved 2019-04-05.
  2. ^ a b "Solomon is new FDA CVM director". American Veterinary Medical Association. February 15, 2017. Retrieved 30 June 2019.
  3. ^ Hill, R.E.,Jr.; Foley, P.L.; Clough, N.E.; Ludemann, L.R.; Murtle, D.C. (2013). "Translating Research into Licensed Vaccines and Validated and Licensed Diagnostic Tests". In Roth, J.A.; Richt, J.A.; Morozov, I.A. (eds.). Vaccines and diagnostics for transboundary animal diseases : Ames, Iowa, 17-19 September 2012. Karger Medical and Scientific Publishers. pp. 53–54. ISBN 9783318023664.
  4. ^ a b Plumlee, Konnie (2004). "Chapter 5. Regulatory toxicology". Clinical Veterinary Toxicology. Mosby. p. 29. ISBN 9780323011259.