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The Calamoideae are a subfamily of the palm family Arecaceae containing 21 genera and about 620 species. They are found almost exclusively in the Old World tropics, but with three genera (Mauritia, Mauritiella, Lepidocaryum) and a single species of Raphia (R. taedigera) in the New World tropics.[1][2] Calamoideae includes the rattan palms, whose stems are harvested for the production of cane furniture and many other products. All species have fruits covered in distinctive overlapping scales.[2]

Calamoideae
Calamus gibbsianus.jpg
Calamus gibbsianus.
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Clade: Commelinids
Order: Arecales
Family: Arecaceae
Subfamily: Calamoideae
Griff.[1]
3 tribes

See text

Calamoideaedistribution.jpg

ClassificationEdit

The Calamoideae are divided into three tribes:[3]

Some classifications combine all 5 genera of subtribe Calamineae into an expanded genus Calamus. This increases the size of what is already the largest palm genus at over 370 species[2] to around 520.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b John Leslie Dowe. Australian Palms: Biogeography, Ecology and Systematics. p. 55. Retrieved April 20, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c Dransfield, John; Uhl, Natalie W.; Asmussen, Conny B.; Baker, William J.; Harley, Madeline M.; Lewis, Carl E. (2008). Genera Palmarum - The Evolution and Classification of Palms. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ISBN 9781842461822.
  3. ^ Dransfield, John; Uhl, Natalie W.; Asmussen, Conny B.; Baker, William J.; Harley, Madeline M.; Lewis, Carl E. (2005). "A new phylogenetic classification of the palm family, Arecaceae". Kew Bulletin. 60: 559–569 – via ResearchGate.
  4. ^ Baker, William J. (2015). "A revised delimitation of the rattan genus Calamus (Arecaceae)". Phytotaxa. 197 (2). ISSN 1179-3163.

Further readingEdit