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Boris Iosifovich Mints (Russian: Минц, Борис Иосифович) (born 24 July 1958) is a Russian billionaire businessman and philanthropist.

Boris Mints
Boris Mints (2018).jpg
Born
Boris Iosifovich Mints

(1958-07-24) 24 July 1958 (age 61)
Moldova, USSR
ResidenceMoscow, Russia
NationalityRussian
CitizenshipRussian and Maltese
Alma materIvanovo State University
OccupationBusinessman
Net worthUS$ 1.3 billion (February 2018)[1]
Spouse(s)Marina Vladimirovna Mints
Children4
Parent(s)Iosif Samuilovich Mints
Lusia Izrailevna Milter

Contents

Early lifeEdit

Boris Mints was born in Rybnitsa, Moldavian SSR, USSR (now Moldova), to military engineer Major Joseph Samuilovich Mints (born 1932, in Nevel), and librarian Lusia Izrailevna Milter (1936–2007, Kodyma, Ukrainian SSR). As a child, Milter was deported to the Chechelnik ghetto in Transnistria from 1941 to 1944, while 14 men of her family died on the front during the Second World War, including both of Boris's grandfathers, Samuil Iosifovich Mints (1892–1942) and Israel Gershkovich Milter (1901–1944).[citation needed]

In 1980, he earned a bachelor's degree in physics from Ivanovo State University. Mints has a PhD in technical sciences and is an associate professor of higher mathematics.[2]

CareerEdit

Between 1983 and 1990, he worked at the Ivanovo Textile Institute.[citation needed]

Between 1987 and 1990, he worked in a Youth Center for Scientific Creativity where he earned his first capital.[citation needed]

Between 1990 and 1994, he was vice mayor of Ivanovo and chaired the city property management committee (CPMC).[citation needed]

Between 1996 and 2000, he was the head of the Office of the President of the Russian Federation for Issues of Local Governance and Secretary of the Council for Local Government in the Russian Federation, chaired by the President of the Russian Federation, Boris Yeltsin.[citation needed]

Between 2001 and 2003, he was the general director of REN TV.[citation needed]

Between 2004 and 2013, he was chairman, and between 2012 and 2013, he was president of Otkritie Financial Corporation.[citation needed]

In 2004, he founded the O1 Group investment company which owns and manages assets in real estate and financial sectors.[citation needed]

In 2010, he founded the investment company O1 Properties for managing real estate assets. At the end of 2017, O1 Properties was the 6th largest owner of commercial real estate in Russia.[3]

In 2013, Mints ceased to be a shareholder of the Otkritie Financial Corporation, selling his shares to other partners.[citation needed]

Between 2014 and 2015, he acquired shares in the Austrian companies CA Immo and Immofinanz. CA Immo owns and manages commercial property in Austria, Germany and Eastern Europe.[citation needed]

In 2013, the O1 Group began acquiring pension business assets and until the middle of 2017 concluded deals to purchase NPF Telecom-Soyuz, NPF Stalfond, NPF Blagosostoyanie OPS, NPF Uralsib, NPF Obrazovaniye, NPF Our Future, NPF Socialnoe Razvitie. [4]

As a result, in 2016 the Future Financial Group, one of the largest pension asset managers in Russia, was established. The Group manages several leading funds in the compulsory and non-state pension sector, including NPF Future, NPF Telecom-Soyuz and NPF Obrazovaniye.[citation needed]

In October 2016, the Future Financial Group held a public offering (IPO) of ordinary shares of FG Future on the Moscow Stock Exchange.[5]

In September 2018, Boris Mints sold O1 Properties and the Future Financial Group (includes NPF Future).[6]

Member of the board of directors of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs.[citation needed] Russian Jewish Congress Presiding Board Bureau member. Russian Jewish Congress Presiding Board member.

Vice-president of the World Jewish Congress.Founder and chairman of the Yegor Gaidar international foundation.[7]

Member of the board of directors of the regional charity foundation "Child Rehabilitation. G.N. Romanov Center".[8]

Honorary professor and member of the capital campaign cabinet of Tel Aviv University.[citation needed]

Member of the Board of Governors of Tel Aviv University.[9]

President (and founder) of the Boris Mints Institute for Strategic Policy Solutions to Global Challenges at Tel Aviv University.[10]

Chairman of the board of trustees of the Conference of European Rabbis.[11]

Mints is one of many "Russian oligarchs" named in the Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, CAATSA, signed into law by President Donald Trump in 2017.[12]

HobbiesEdit

Mints plays chess and tennis. Since 2001, he collects Russian paintings and graphics, mainly works by painters from the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries. His collection includes works by Serov, Korovin, Kustodiev, Konchalovsky, Polenov, Pimenov, Gerasimov.[13] Based on his collection, Mints created the private Museum of Russian Impressionism in Moscow in the building of the former confectionery factory "Bolshevik". The Museum that was opened to the public in May 2016. The construction of the exhibition building at the Bolshevik site, based on a design by John McAslan + Partners, cost $16.5 million[14].

In 2015, Mints became a supporter and sponsor of the Institute for Strategic Policy Solutions to Global Challenges, named in his honour, in collaboration with Tel Aviv University.[citation needed]

AwardsEdit

In 2014, the Miloserdiye awards ceremony took place to honour public figures for their commitment to humanitarian values, and Mints became the first recipient.[citation needed]

In May 2015, Mints, as founder of the Museum of Russian Impressionism, won the Prize named after Yekaterina Romanovna Dashkova, nominated in the “Patron of the Arts” category.[citation needed]

Charity and patronageEdit

In September 2014, Mints facilitated the installation in Moscow of a sculptural and spatial composition by the Russian sculptor and academician Georgy Frangulyan adjacent to the White Square business center.[citation needed]

Mints also supports a number of cultural events such as: Golden Mask and "Territory" theatre festivals, the Arkhangelsk Street Theatre Festival, Vladimir Spivakov Foundation projects, Valery Gergiev "Easter Festival" and others.[15]

Personal lifeEdit

He is married to Marina Vladimirovna Mints, and they have four children.[citation needed]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Forbes Profile: Boris Mints". Forbes. Retrieved 8 February 2018.
  2. ^ "Russian Investor Boris Mints to Launch Tender Offer for 10 Pct of CA Immo Shares". Vindobona.org. Retrieved 2016-04-04.
  3. ^ "Короли российской недвижимости – 2017: рейтинг Forbes | Бизнес | Forbes.ru". www.forbes.ru. Retrieved 2018-04-13.
  4. ^ Ведомости (2013-12-25). "O1 Group Бориса Минца купила НПФ "Стальфонд"". Retrieved 2018-04-13.
  5. ^ "Пенсии в свободном обращении". Газета "Коммерсантъ". 2016-10-14. p. 1. Retrieved 2018-04-13.
  6. ^ "Минц передал контроль над ФГ "Будущее" и O1 Properties кипрской компании Riverstretch". ТАСС. Retrieved 2018-12-05.
  7. ^ "Yegor Gaidar Foundation". Yegor Gaidar Foundation. Retrieved 2018-04-13.
  8. ^ "Правление и Попечительский совет Фонда". romanov-rehab.org. Retrieved 2018-04-13.
  9. ^ "Tel Aviv University Governors Roll". Tel Aviv University. Retrieved 2017-08-06.
  10. ^ "Inauguration of the Boris Mints Institute". resolution.tau.ac.il. Retrieved 2017-08-06.
  11. ^ "Раввин ПИНХАС ГОЛЬДШМИДТ: Награда уходит Ангеле Меркель | Журнал «Москва-Ерушалаим»". www.moscow-jerusalem.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 2018-04-13.
  12. ^ "Report to Congress Pursuant to Section 241 of the Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act of 2017 Regarding Senior Foreign Political Figures and Oligarchs in the Russian Federation and Russian Parastatal Entities" (PDF). January 29, 2018.
  13. ^ "Главная - Музей русского импрессионизма". www.rusimp.su (in Russian). Retrieved 2018-04-13.
  14. ^ "Масштаб впечатлений: Борис Минц рассказал Forbes о своем музее | Увлечения | Forbes.ru". www.forbes.ru. Retrieved 2018-04-13.
  15. ^ "XVII Московский Пасхальный фестиваль | Московский Пасхальный фестиваль". Московский Пасхальный фестиваль (in Russian). Retrieved 2018-04-13.

External linksEdit