Blind Man's Eyes

Blind Man's Eyes is a 1919 American silent drama film directed by John Ince and starring Bert Lytell, Frank Currier, and Naomi Childers. It was released on March 10, 1919.

Blind Man's Eyes
Blindmanseyes-1919-lanternslide.jpg
Lantern slide
Directed byJohn Ince
Produced byMaxwell Karger
Written byJune Mathis
Based on
the novel, The Blind Man's Eyes
by
StarringBert Lytell
Frank Currier
Naomi Childers
CinematographyRobert B. Kurrle
Production
company
Release date
  • March 10, 1919 (1919-03-10) (US)[1]
Running time
5 reels
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

PlotEdit

Hugh Overton has been falsely convicted of the murder of Matthew Latrone and sent to prison. In order to clear his name, he escapes and heads back to the scene of the crime, traveling under the name of Philip Eaton. While on the train he runs into Basil Santoine, a blind attorney who he knows has the evidence to prove his innocence. Latrone has also learned of Overton's trip and has sent his henchman, Donald Avery, to dispose of Eaton. Unfortunately, Avery mistakes Santoine for Eaton and attempts to kill him, but simply leaves him unconscious.

When he awakes, Santoine suspects Eaton, due to his voice, who he had heard earlier in the evening, and which he remembered as he was one of the witnesses at Overton's trial. Santoine invite him back to his home, in order to figure out what his role is in everything. While under Santoine's roof, Eaton/Overton falls in love with Harriet, Basil's daughter, who refers to her as his "eyes", hence she is the "blind man's eyes".

Overton knows that Santoine has evidence in his safe which will prove his innocence. Latrone, who everyone thinks is dead, also knows this. Both men attempt to break into Santoine's safe on the same night. Overton and Latrone struggle, but Latrone is shot and killed by Avery, who had come as backup to his employer. The evidence comes to light, and Overton is declared innocent, after which he and Harriet become a couple.

CastEdit

ProductionEdit

Production on the film began on January 6, 1919, as soon as Bert Lytell had returned from a stint in training for the U.S. Army.[2][3] The first scenes of the picture were filmed at a newly constructed courtroom set on the Metro lot. It was revealed in mid-January that William Ince would direct the film, and Naomi Childers would be the female lead opposite Lytell.[4] It was reported that by January 25 the film was approximately half-way completed. Some of the interiors had been filmed in a Pullman car located on the Metro lot.[5] The Pullman car was specially built on the Metro lot, in their new large studio, and was built to standard Pullman specifications.[6]

Later Metro chartered a special train which traveled over 110 miles outside Los Angeles, the train consisted of an engine, a Pullman, and an obvservation car. Several scenes were shot inside the train, but many exterior shots were also filmed.[5][7] In early February it was reported that other actors attached to the project included Joseph Kilgour, Frank Currier, Richard Morris, Morris Foster, Gertrude Claire, and Mignon Anderson.[8] By the end of April, filming on the picture was almost completed,[9] and a release date of March 10 was announced.[10] The production was completed by March 1.[11]

ReceptionEdit

Exhibitors Herald gave the picture a positive review. They felt that the film had a unique twist in its plot, and the only downside they saw to the film was the unrelenting suspense. They felt the cast as a whole did a good job, and highlighted the performances of Lytell, Currier, and Childers.[12] Moving Picture World also gave the film a positive review, calling it a "strong mystery story", and calling Bert Lytell's performance "excellent". They also applauded Ince's direction, as well as Childer's performance.[13] Picture-Play Magazine gave Lytell's performance high marks, saying that his characterization "is appealing from the very outset and which grows more appealing with each successive scene.[14]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Blind Man's Eyes". American Film Institute. Retrieved August 29, 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ J.C. Jessen (January 4, 1919). "In and Out of West Coast Studios". Motion Picture News. p. 122. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 
  3. ^ "Studio Shorts". Motion Picture World. January 11, 1919. p. 196. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 
  4. ^ J.C. Jessen (January 18, 1919). "In and Out of West Coast Studios". Motion Picture News. p. 409. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 
  5. ^ a b J.C. Jessen (January 25, 1919). "In and Out of West Coast Studios". Motion Picture News. p. 585. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 
  6. ^ "Reproduces Pullman for Metro Picture". Moving Picture World. March 1, 1919. p. 1227. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 
  7. ^ "Get Special Train for Lytell". Moving Picture World. February 1, 1919. p. 661. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 
  8. ^ "Four Under Way and One in Production". Motion Picture News. February 8, 1919. p. 875. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 
  9. ^ "Lytell Finishing Picture". Motion Picture News. February 22, 1919. p. 1165. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 
  10. ^ "Metro Names for March". Motion Picture News. February 22, 1919. p. 1183. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 
  11. ^ "Bert Lytell Completes His Work on "Blind Man's Eyes"". Moving Picture World. March 1, 1919. p. 1236. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 
  12. ^ "Reviews: Bert Lytell in Blind Man's Eyes". Exhibitors Herald. March 29, 1919. p. 33. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 
  13. ^ "Reviews and Advertising Aids: "Blind Man's Eyes"". Moving Picture World. March 22, 1919. pp. 1698–99. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 
  14. ^ Peter Milne (June 1919). "The Screen Review". Picture-Play Magazine. p. 280. Retrieved December 11, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) 

External linksEdit