Roman Catholic Diocese of Orvieto-Todi

  (Redirected from Bishop of Orvieto)

The Italian Catholic Diocese of Orvieto-Todi (Latin: Dioecesis Urbevetana-Tudertina), in central Italy, was created in 1986 when the historical Diocese of Orvieto was united to the Diocese of Todi. This diocese is directly subject to the Holy See.[1][2] The current bishop is Benedetto Tuzia.

Diocese of Orvieto-Todi

Dioecesis Urbevetana-Tudertina
Facciata del Duomo di Orvieto.JPG
Orvieto Cathedral
Location
CountryItaly
Ecclesiastical provinceImmediately subject to the Holy See
Statistics
Area1,200 km2 (460 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2016)
95,000 (est.)
90,000 (guess) (94.7%)
Parishes92
Information
DenominationCatholic Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established6th century
CathedralBasilica Cattedrale di S. Maria Assunta (Orvieto)
Co-cathedralBasilica Concattedrale di S. Maria Annunziata (Todi)
Secular priests58 (diocesan)
49 (Religious Orders)
19 Permanent Deacons
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopBenedetto Tuzia
Bishops emeritusGiovanni Scanavino, O.S.A.
Map
locator map of diocese of Orvieto, east of Lake Bolsena
Website
www.webdiocesi.chiesacattolica.it
Subdivision of the diocese

HistoryEdit

During the Gothic War, Orvieto was defended by the Goths for a long time. Later, it fell into the hands of the Lombards (606). From the latter end of the tenth century the city was governed by consuls, who, however, took the oath of fealty to the bishop; but from 1201 it governed itself through a podestà (in that year, the Bishop Richard) and a captain of the people. On account of its position on the top of a volcanic outcrop, Orvieto was often chosen by the popes as a place of refuge, and Pope Adrian IV (1154–1159), who visited the city in September and October 1156, had it fortified.[citation needed]

The first known Bishop of Orvieto was John (about 590), and in 591 appears a Bishop Candidus; among its other prelates were Bishop Constantinus, O.P., sent by Pope Alexander IV in 1255 to Greece as his Legate, where he died in 1257;[3]

In 1528 Pope Clement VII sought refuge at Orvieto, after the sack of Rome, and while there ordered the construction of the "Pozzo di San Patrizio" (the well of St. Patrick),[4] by Antonio da Sangallo; it was completed in the reign of Pope Paul III (1534–1549).[5]

Bishop Sebastiano Vanzi (1562–1570) participated in the 17th through 25th sessions of the Council of Trent (1562–1563) as one of the Definitori (legal draftsmen).[6] In accordance with the decrees of the Council, he established the seminary of Orvieto as an institution; it was enlarged with a building of its own in 1645 by Cardinal Fausto Polo; later Giacomo Silvestri gave it the college and other property which was confiscated from the Jesuits (1773) when their religious order was suppressed.[7]

Cardinal Paolo Antamori (1780) caused the history of the cathedral of Orvieto to be written by Guglielmo della Valle.[citation needed]

The territory of Aquapendente was placed under the control of the diocese of Orvieto by Pope Paschal II in 1102.[8]

Chapter and cathedralEdit

Bishop Francesco Monaldeschi (1280) did much for the construction of the cathedral.[9]

In 1695, the Chapter, which was the cathedral's administrative body, was composed of two dignities, the Archdeacon and the Provost, and sixteen Canons.[10]

Diocesan synodsEdit

A diocesan synod was an irregularly held, but important, meeting of the bishop of a diocese and his clergy. Its purpose was (1) to proclaim generally the various decrees already issued by the bishop; (2) to discuss and ratify measures on which the bishop chose to consult with his clergy; (3) to publish statutes and decrees of the diocesan synod, of the provincial synod, and of the Holy See.[11]

Cardinal Girolamo Simoncelli (1570–1605) presided over a diocesan synod in 1592.[12]

Cardinal Pier Paolo Crescenzi (1621–1644) held a diocesan synod on 9 June 1627; another on 6 June 1639; and another on 19 May 1643.[13] Cardinal Fausto Poli (1644–1653) held a synod on 21 May 1647.[14] Bishop Giuseppe della Corgna, O.P. (1656–1676) presided over a diocesan synod held in Orvieto on 20—22 October 1666, and had the decrees published.[15] Bishop Bernardino Rocci (1676–1680) held a synod on 16 May 1679.[16]

Bishop Vincenzo degl'Atti (1696–1715) presided over a diocesan synod in 1713.[17] Bishop Onofrio Elisei (1721–1733) held diocesan synods on: 9—11 May 1723; 24 April 1726; 27 April 1727; and 11 April 1728.[18]

Reorganization of diocesesEdit

In a decree of the Second Vatican Council, it was recommended that dioceses be reorganized to take into account modern developments.[19] A project begun on orders from Pope John XXIII, and continued under his successors, was intended to reduce the number of dioceses in Italy and to rationalize their borders in terms of modern population changes and shortages of clergy. The change was made urgent because of changes made to the Concordat between the Italian State and the Holy See on 18 February 1984, and embodied in a law of 3 June 1985. The change was approved by Pope John Paul II in an audience of 27 September 1986, and by a decree of the Sacred Congregation of Bishops of the Papal Curia on 30 September 1986. The diocese of Todi was united to the diocese of Orvieto. Its name was to be Dioecesis Urbevetana-Tudertina. The seat of the diocese was to be in Orvieto. The former cathedral in Todi was to have the honorary title of co-cathedral, and its Chapter was to be called the Capitulum Concathedralis. There was to be only one episcopal curia, one seminary, one ecclesiastical tribunal; and all the clergy were to be incardinated in the diocese of Orvieto-Todi. The territory of the diocese was to be the same as the two dioceses combined.[20]

Bishops of OrvietoEdit

to 1200Edit

...
  • Joannes (attested 590)[21]
  • Candidus (attested 591, 596)[22]
...
  • Amantius (attested 743)[23]
...
  • Alipertus (attested 826)[24]
...
  • Heldericus (attested 1015)[25]
...
  • Sigefridus (attested 1027)[26]
...
  • Leo (attested 1036)[27]
...
  • Teuzo (attested 1054, 1059)[28]
...
  • Guilelmus (Wilhelm) (attested 1103–1126)[29]
...
  • Lanfranc (attested 1161)[30]
  • Milo (c. 1165–1167)[31]
Sede vacante (7 years)
  • Rusticus (1168–1172)[32]
  • Riccardus (attested 1179–1200)[33]

from 1200 to 1500Edit

  • Matthaeus Alberici (1201–1210)[34]
  • Joannes Capelli (attested 1211, 1212)[35]
  • Capitan(er)ius (1213–1227 ?)[36]
  • Rainerius (attested 1228, 1246)
  • Constantinus (attested 1250, 1257)[37]
  • Jacobus Maltraga (attested 1258–1269)
  • Aldobrandinus Cavalcanti, O.P. (attested 1272–1279)
  • Franciscus Monaldeschi (1280–1295)[38]
  • Leonardus Mancini (1296–1302)[39]
  • Guittus de Nobilibus (1302–1328)[40]
  • Tramus, O.P. (1328–1345)[41]
  • Raymond de Chameyrac (1346–1348)
  • Pontius de Péret (1348–1361)
  • Joannes de Magnania (1361–1364)[42]
  • Pierre Bohier, O.S.B. (1364–1379)[43]
  • Nicolaus Marciari (1379–1389) (Roman Obedience)
  • Nicolaus of Perugia (1389–1398) (Roman Obedience)
  • Nicolaus, O.S.B. (1398-1399) (Roman Obedience)
  • Matthaeus Avveducci, O.Min. (1399–1409)[44]
Cardinal Corrado Caracciolo (1409–1411) Administrator
Monaldo de' Monaldeschi (1411–1418) Administrator

from 1500 to 1800Edit

Sede vacante (1653–1656)
Sede vacante (1795–1800)[70]

from 1800 to 2003Edit

  • Cardinal Cesare Brancadoro (1800–1803)[71]
  • Giovanni Battista Lambruschini (1807–1825)[72]
  • Antonio Domenico Gamberini (19 Dec 1825 – 13 Apr 1833 Resigned)
  • Antonio Francesco Orioli, O.F.M. Conv. (15 Apr 1833 – 18 Dec 1841 Resigned)
  • Giuseppe Maria Vespignani (24 Jan 1842 – 2 Feb 1865 Died)[73]
  • Marino Marini (27 Mar 1865 – 15 Oct 1871 Resigned)
  • Antonio Briganti (27 Oct 1871 – 2 Oct 1882 Resigned)
  • Eusebio Magner, O.F.M. Cap. (25 Sep 1882 – 15 Aug 1884 Died)
  • Giuseppe Ingami (10 Nov 1884 – 14 Aug 1889 Died)
  • Domenico Bucchi-Accica (30 Dec 1889 – 7 Jan 1905 Died)
  • Salvatore Fratocchi (24 Jan 1905 – 6 Dec 1941 Died)
  • Francesco Pieri (6 Dec 1941 Succeeded – 15 May 1961 Died)
  • Virginio Dondeo (22 Jul 1961 – 6 Aug 1974 Died)
  • Decio Lucio Grandoni (12 Dec 1974 – 8 Nov 2003 Retired)
 
Co-Cathedral in Todi

Bishops of Orvieto-TodiEdit

30 September 1986: United with the Diocese of Todi to form the Diocese of Orvieto-Todi

  • Giovanni Scanavino, O.S.A. (8 November 2003 – 5 March 2011)[74]
  • Benedetto Tuzia (31 May 2012 – )[75][76]

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ "Diocese of Orvieto-Todi" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016.[self-published source]
  2. ^ "Diocese of Orvieto–Todi" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016.[self-published source]
  3. ^ Cappelletti, p. 486, quoting a manuscript chronicle in the Monastery of S. Domenico: "Fr. Constantinus Romane Provincie, quoniam unita erat cum Provincia Regni fuit Ep. Urbevet. qui sub Anno MCCLV, per pp. Alexandrum missus est pro Legato in Greciam." Cappelletti claims that Pope Alexander IV was in Orvieto in 1255, which is refuted by the evidence of subscriptions to bulls indicating that he was in Naples, then Anagni, then Rome in 1255, but not in Orvieto. Potthast, August (1875). Regesta pontificum romanorum inde a 1198 ad 1304 (in Latin). Vol II. Berlin: De Decker. pp. 1288–1328. |volume= has extra text (help)
  4. ^ Del Sole, F. M. (2015). Mirabilia. Il pozzo di San Patrizio a Orvieto (in Italian). Orvieto: Mirabilia Orvieto. ISBN 9788894117004.
  5. ^ Cappelletti, pp. 515-516.
  6. ^ Mezzadri, Luigi; Tagliaferri, Maurizio; Guerriero, Elio (2008). Le diocesi d'Italia (in Italian). Vol. III. Cinisello Balsamo (Milano): San Paolo. p. 1045. ISBN 978-88-215-6172-6. |volume= has extra text (help)
  7. ^ Adami, Tommaso Piccolomini (1883). Guida storico-artistica della città di Orvieto e suoi contorni: preceduta da cenni storici, cronologici e dalla topografia della città (in Italian). Siena: Tip. all'Ins. di S. Bernardino. pp. 164–169.
  8. ^ Kehr, II, p. 223, no. 5.
  9. ^ Cappelletti, pp. 491-499.
  10. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 398 note 1.
  11. ^ Benedictus XIV (1842). "Lib. I. caput secundum. De Synodi Dioecesanae utilitate". Benedicti XIV ... De Synodo dioecesana libri tredecim (in Latin). Tomus primus. Mechlin: Hanicq. pp. 42–49. Phillips, George (1849). Die Diöcesansynode (in German). Freiburg im Breisgau: Herder. pp. 1–23.
  12. ^ Card. Girolamo Simoncelli (1592), Statuta et constitutiones Synodi dioecesis Vrbevetanae Vrbeveteri: Colaldi 1592.
  13. ^ J.B. Martin and L. Petit (edd.), Sacrorum conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, cujus Johannes Dominicus Mansi et post ipsius mortem Florentius et Venetianus editores ab anno 1758 ad annum 1798 priores triginta unum tomos ediderunt, nunc autem continuatat et absoluta Tomus trigesimus sextuster (Arnhem-Leipzig 1924), pp. 135, 229, 257.
  14. ^ Poli, Fausto (1650). Constitutiones et decreta edita ab eminentiss. & reuerendiss. d. Fausto tit. S. Chrysogoni presb. cardinali Polo, Dei, & Apostol. Sedis gratia episcopo Vrbeuetano. In Synodo celebrata die 21. Maij 1647 (in Latin). Rome: typis Francisci Alberti Tani. The document has an annotated list of the Bishops of Orvieto attached.
  15. ^ della Corgna, Josephus (1667). Constitutiones editae ab Illustriss. et Reuerendiss. Domino Fr. Iosepho della Corgna Episcopo Urbeuetano. In Dioecesana Synodo celebrata in ecclesia sua cathedrali urbeuetana diebus 20. 21. 22. mensis octobris 1666 (in Latin). Orvieto: typis Palmerij Iannotti.
  16. ^ J.B. Martin and L. Petit (edd.), Tomus trigesimus sextuster, p. 474.
  17. ^ J.B. Martin and L. Petit (edd.), Tomus trigesimus sextuster, p. 891.
  18. ^ Elisei, Onuphrio (1730). Constitutiones synodales Urbe vetanae, ex omnibus superioribus synodis manuscriptis ac editis in quatuor synodis dioecesanis conformatis, collectae (etc.) (in Latin). Montefiascone: Seminarium.
  19. ^ Directoriae normae clare a Concilio impertitae de dioecesium recognitione; indicia atque elementa apta ad actionem pastoralem aestimandam ab episcopis suppeditata quibus plurium dioecesium regimen commissum est.
  20. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis An. et Vol. LXXIX (Città del Vaticano: Typis Polyglottis Vaticanis 1987), pp. 811-814.
  21. ^ In December 590, Pope Gregory I wrote a letter to Bishop Joannes, ordering him to end the disorder in the monastery of S. Giorgio. Ughelli, Italia sacra I, p. 1464. Lanzoni, p. 544.
  22. ^ Candidus is wrongly called Canaldus by Ughelli, pp. 1464-1465. Cappelletti, Le chiese d'Italia V, pp. 461-462 (quoting the letters of Pope Gregory I). Kehr, Italia pontificia II, p. 222, nos. 2-3. Lanzoni, p. 544.
  23. ^ Bishop Amantius was present at the Roman synod of Pope Zacharias in 743. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XII (Florence: A. Zatta 1766), p. 384c. Cappelletti, pp. 462-463. Gams, p. 711 column 1.
  24. ^ Bishop Alipertus (Valipertus) was present at the Roman synod of Pope Eugene II in 826. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XIV (Venice: A. Zatta 1769), p. 999. Cappelletti, p. 463.
  25. ^ Bishop Heldericus was present at the Roman synod of Pope Benedict VIII, where he subscribed a bull for the Pope. Ughelli, p. 1465. Cappelletti, p. 465. Schwartz, p. 259.
  26. ^ Sigefridus: Schwartz, p. 259.
  27. ^ Leo was present at the Roman synod held by Pope Benedict IX in 1036. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XIX (Venice: A. Zatta 1774), p. 582. Schwartz, p. 260.
  28. ^ Bishop Teuzo was present at the Roman council of Pope Nicholas II in 1159. Mansi, Tomus XIX, p. 919. Schwartz, p. 260.
  29. ^ Wilhelm: Schwartz, p. 260.
  30. ^ 1161. De Mense Maii. Pax facta fuit per episcopum Lanfrancum inter Urbevetanos et Acquapendentanos: "Annales Urbevetani," in Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Scriptorum Tomus XVIIII (Hannover: Hann 1866), p. 269. Gams, p. 711 column 1.
  31. ^ Milo held the episcopal seat for two years, and died on 21 March 1167, according to a cronachetta in the epsicopal archive, quoted by Cappelletti. Poli, "Series Episcoporum," p. 5, in Constitutiones et decreta. Ughelli, p. 1466. Cappelletti, 476. He is not catalogued by Gams.
  32. ^ Gams, p. 711 column 2.
  33. ^ Riccardus was present at the Third Lateran Council in March 1179. Mansi, Tomus XXII, p. 459. Ughelli, p. 1468. Cappelletti, p. 476. Cf. Gams, p. 711 (who puts a bishop named 'Ubertanus' in the last years of the 12th century, preceded and followed by Richard).
  34. ^ Bishop Matthaeus died on 26 September 1210. Ughelli, p. 1568. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica I, p. 508.
  35. ^ Joannes was bishop-elect on 8 November 1211. He died in 1212. Ughelli, p. 1568. Cappelletti, p. 481.
  36. ^ Cappelletti, pp. 481-483.
  37. ^ Poli, Fausto (1650). Constitutiones et decreta edita ab eminentiss. & reuerendiss. d. Fausto tit. S. Chrysogoni presb. cardinali Polo, Dei, & Apostol. Sedis gratia episcopo Vrbeuetano. In Synodo celebrata die 21. Maij 1647 (in Latin). Rome: typis Francisci Alberti Tani. The document has an annotated list of the Bishops of Orvieto attached, p. 9. Cappelletti, p. 486.
  38. ^ Monaldeschi was appointed Bishop of Orvieto by Pope Nicholas III on 11 May 1280. Bishop Francesco was transferred to the diocese of Florence on 13 September 1295, while Pope Boniface VIII reserved to himself the appointment of the next bishop. Cappelletti, pp. 491-500. Eubel, I, pp. 250, 508.
  39. ^ Leonardo had been Archdeacon of Barre in the diocese of Langres and was a papal chaplain. He was appointed Bishop of Orvieto by Boniface VIII on 24 April 1296. He was transferred to the diocese of Siponto (Manfredonia) on 9 February 1302. Cappelletti, pp. 500-501. Eubel I, pp. 453, 508.
  40. ^ Guitto (Farnese): Marabottini, p. 12. Ughelli, pp. 1473-1474. Cappelletti, p. 508.
  41. ^ Beltramus Monaldeschi had been bishop-elect of Balneoregia. He was appointed on 5 October 1328 by Pope John XXII. He died in Avignon in 1345 or 1346. Fausto Poli, p. 13. Cappelletti, pp. 501-505. Eubel I, p. 508.
  42. ^ Cappelletti, pp. 507-508.
  43. ^ Bohier was deposed by Urban VI (Roman Obedience) because of his adherence to Clement VII (Avignon Obedience. Eubel, I, p. 508 note 10.
  44. ^ A native of Orvieto and former bishop of Balnoregio (Bagnorea), Bishop Matteo held a diocesan synod in 1404. He was removed, as a supporter of Gregory XII, who had been deposed from the papacy by the Council of Pisa in May 1409. Cappelletti, p. 511. Eubel I, p. 509, with note 12.
  45. ^ Monaldeschi was initially below the minimum age for episcopal consecration at the time of his appointment by Pope Martin V, and was thus for a time Administrator. He was transferred to the diocese of Teramo on 6 September 1443 by Pope Eugene IV. He had become odious to the populace of Orvieto. He was then transferred to the diocese of Ascoli Piceno on 25 September 1450 by Pope Nicholas V. He died in 1461. Cappelletti, pp. 511-512. Eubel I, p. 509; II, pp. 90, 260.
  46. ^ Bishop Jacobus was transferred to the diocese of Penne on 21 October 1454. Eubel II, pp. 213, 260.
  47. ^ A native of Milan, Giovanni de Polena had been and Auditor of the Sacred Palace, and then Bishop of Penne (1433–1454); he exchanged dioceses with Bishop Jacobus Benedicti of Orvieto on 21 October 1454. He died on 1 September 1456. Ughelli, p. 1456. Cappelletti, p. 513. Eubel II, pp. 213, 260.
  48. ^ Cabateri was appointed on 23 July 1456. Eubel II, p. 260.
  49. ^ Marinoni, a doctor of Canon Law, had been bishop of Alessandria (Savoy). He was transferred to the diocese of Orvieto on 1 June 1457 by Pope Calixtus III. Eubel II, pp. 85. 260.
  50. ^ Eubel II, p. 260.
  51. ^ Eubel, Hierarchia catholica II, p. 260; III, p. 323 with note 2.
  52. ^ Baglioni was appointed by Pope Leo X in the consistory of 14 October 1511. He died in 1519. Eubel, III, p. 353.
  53. ^ Cardinal Ridolfi, who was already Archbishop of Florence, was appointed administrator by Pope Leo X in the consistory of 24 August 1520. Pope Leo was particularly concerned about the work on the restoration of the cathedral and the laxness of the cathedral chamberlain in carrying out his duties. Ridolfi oversaw the diocese for eight years, resigning on 3 September 1529, upon the appointment of a new bishop. Cappelletti, p. 515. Eubel, III, p. 353.
  54. ^ Durante had been Archpriest of the Cathedral of Orvieto. He was named bishop by Pope Clement VII on 3 September 1529. He died on 4 December 1545. Eubel, III, p. 353.
  55. ^ Vanzi was appointed Bishop of Orvieto by Pope Pius IV on 17 April 1562. He died in 1570. Eubel, III, p. 353.
  56. ^ Sannesio was named a cardinal by Pope Clement VIII on 9 June 1604. He was appointed Bishop of Orvieto on 20 June 1605. He died in Rome on 19 February 1621. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, pp. 8 no. 46; 353 with note 2.
  57. ^ Crescenzi was named a cardinal by Pope Paul V on 17 August 1611. He was appointed Bishop of Orvieto on 17 March 1621. He resigned the diocese on 23 May 1644, and died in Orvieto on 7 October 1653. Gauchat, IV, pp. 12 no. 25; 353 with note 3.
  58. ^ Poli was named a cardinal by Pope Urban VIII on 13 July 1643. He was named Bishop of Orvieto on 23 May 1644. He died in Orvieto on 7 October 1653 at the age of seventy-five. Gauchat, IV, pp. 25 no. 59; 353 with note 4.
  59. ^ Della Corgna had been Bishop of Caserta (1626–1637), and then of Squillace (1636–1656). He was transferred to the diocese of Orvieto on 20 March 1656 by Pope Alexander VII. He resigned the diocese on 23 February 1676. He died in Rome on 27 March 1678, at the age of eighty-six. Gauchat, IV, pp. 138; 321; 353 with note 5.
  60. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 398 with note 3.
  61. ^ On 17 May 1694 Millini was appointed Archbishop (Personal Title) of Nepi e Sutri by Pope Innocent XII. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 398 with note 4.
  62. ^ Camuzzi: Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 398 with note 5.
  63. ^ Degl'Atti: Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 398 with note 6.
  64. ^ Nuzzi: Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 398 with note 7.
  65. ^ Elisei: Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 398 with note 8.
  66. ^ Marsciano: Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 426 with note 2.
  67. ^ Silvestri: Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 426 with note 3.
  68. ^ Ripanti: Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 426 with note 4.
  69. ^ Antamori was named a cardinal on 11 December 1780. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 426 with note 5.
  70. ^ Gaetano Moroni, Dizionario di erudizione historico-ecclesiastica Vol. 49 (Venice: Tipografia Emiliana 1848), p. 222 column 2. Cappelletti, p. 526.
  71. ^ A native of Fermo, Brancadoro had previously been titular Archbishop of Nisibis (1789–1800). In 1792 he was papal Nuncio in Belgium (the Low Countries), and in 1797 was appointed Secretary of the Sacred Congregation de propaganda fide in the Roman Curia. He was present in Venice for the conclave of 1799–1800, and gave the official funeral oration for Pope Pius VI on 30 October 1799. On 11 August 1800 he was transferred to the diocese of Orvieto by Pope Pius VI, and on 23 February 1801 was named a cardinal by Pope Pius VII. He was transferred to the diocese of Fermo on 11 July 1803. He died on 10 September 1837. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 311 with note 4.
  72. ^ From 1800 to 1807 Lambruschini was Coadjutor bishop of Genoa and titular bishop of Azotus in Palestine. He was appointed Bishop of Orvieto by Pope Pius VII on 3 August 1807. He died on 24 November 1825. Cappelletti, p. 526. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, p. 101, 220, 383.
  73. ^ A native of Rome, Vespignani had been a Canon of the Lateran Basilica. He was appointed titular Archbishop of Tyana (Turkey) on 23 June 1834, and served as Secretary of the SC of Bishops from 1836 to 1842. He was named Bishop of Orvieto by Pope Gregory XVI on 24 January 1842, and allowed to retain the title of archbishop. He died on 2 February 1865. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, pp. 382, 384.
  74. ^ "Rinunce e nomine, 08.11.2003" (Press release) (in Italian). Holy See Press Office. 8 November 2003. Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  75. ^ "Rinunce e nomine, 31.05.2012" (Press release) (in Italian). Holy See Press Office. 31 May 2012. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  76. ^ CV of current bishop: Diocesi di Orvieto-Todi, "Biografia: S.E.Mons. Benedetto Tuzia"; retrieved: 1 May 2019. [extensive CV available as *.pdf] (in Italian)

BibliographyEdit

Reference worksEdit

StudiesEdit

External linksEdit

  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Missing or empty |title= (help)