Assistant Secretary for Health

The assistant secretary for health (ASH) serves as the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services's primary advisor on matters involving the nation's public health and, if serving as an active-duty officer in the regular corps, is the highest ranking uniformed officer in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC). The ASH oversees all matters pertaining to the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS), the main division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), for the Secretary and provides strategic and policy direction for the commissioned corps. The PHS comprises almost all the agency divisions of the HHS as well as the commissioned corps, a uniformed service of more than 6,700 health professionals who serve at the HHS, other federal agencies, and/or are assigned details to the armed forces. The ASH is a civilian or a uniformed officer of the regular corps and is nominated for appointment by the president. The nominee must also be confirmed by the Senate. The ASH serves a four-year term of office at the pleasure of the President. If the appointee is also a serving uniformed officer of the regular corps, he or she is also appointed as a four-star admiral in the regular corps.[1][2] The President may also nominate a civilian appointee to also be appointed a direct commission into the regular corps if the nominee so chooses.[2][3] As such the position of ASH is the only office in the PHS that merits a four-star grade in the regular corps. The assistant secretary's office and staff are known as the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH). The current assistant secretary for health is Admiral Brett Giroir.

Assistant Secretary for Health
United States Public Health Service (seal).svg
Seal of the United States Public Health Service, 1798
Flag of the Assistant Secretary for Health.png
Flag of the Assistant Secretary for Health
ADM Brett P. Giroir, USPHS.jpg
Incumbent
Admiral Brett P. Giroir, USPHS

since February 15, 2018
Public Health Service
Public Health Service, Commissioned Corps
Reports toSecretary of Health and Human Services
SeatHubert H. Humphrey Building, United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Washington, D.C.
AppointerPresident of the United States
with United States Senate advice and consent
Term length4 years
Constituting instrument42 U.S.C. § 202 and
42 U.S.C. § 207
FormationNovember 2, 1965; 55 years ago (1965-11-02)
First holderPhilip R. Lee
WebsiteOfficial website

HistoryEdit

The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health and Scientific Affairs was established on January 1, 1967 following the Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1966. The plan allowed the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare to restructure the Public Health Service to better serve public health.[4] The office was renamed to the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health following the Department of Education Organization Act in 1972.[4]

Office of the Assistant Secretary for HealthEdit

As of 2018, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health oversees 12 core public health offices, 10 regional health offices, and 10 presidential and secretarial advisory committees.[5] Prior to 2010, the Office was known as the Office of Public Health and Science.[6]

 
The stars, shoulder boards, and sleeve stripes of the Assistant Secretary for Health if serving in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps.

List of Assistant Secretaries for HealthEdit

No. Assistant secretary Term Pay schedule or
Service branch
Portrait Name Took office Left office Term length
1Philip R. Lee2 November 196519693 years 
Executive
Schedule IV
2Roger O. Egeberg14 July 196919712 years 
Executive
Schedule IV
3Merlin K. DuVal1 July 197120 January 19731 year, 203 days 
Executive
Schedule IV
4Charles C. Edwards18 April 19735 January 19751 year, 262 days 
Executive
Schedule IV
5Theodore Cooper1 July 197519772 years 
Executive
Schedule IV
6Vice Admiral
Julius B. Richmond
13 July 197714 May 19813 years, 305 days 
U.S. Public
Health Service
Commissioned Corps
7Edward Brandt Jr.198119843 Years 
Executive
Schedule IV
8Robert E. Windom198619893 Years 
Executive
Schedule IV
9Admiral
James O. Mason
198919934 years 
U.S. Public
Health Service
10Philip R. Lee2 July 199319985 Years 
Executive
Schedule IV
11Admiral
David Satcher
13 February 1998January 20013 years 
U.S. Public
Health Service
Commissioned Corps
12Eve Slater8 February 20025 February 2003362 days 
Executive
Schedule IV
-Rear Admiral
Cristina V. Beato
Acting
5 February 200317 December 20052 years, 315 days 
U.S. Public
Health Service
Commissioned Corps
13Admiral
John O. Agwunobi
17 December 20054 September 20071 year, 261 days 
U.S. Public
Health Service
Commissioned Corps
14Admiral
Joxel García
28 March 200820 January 2009298 days 
U.S. Public
Health Service
Commissioned Corps
-Rear Admiral
Steven K. Galson
Acting
22 January 200922 June 2009151 days 
U.S. Public
Health Service
Commissioned Corps
15Howard K. Koh22 June 2009August 20145 years 
Executive
Schedule IV
-Karen B. DeSalvo
Acting
October 20143 January 2017More than 2 years[7] 
Executive
Schedule IV
-Don J. Wright
Acting
4 January 201715 February 20181 year, 42 days 
Executive
Schedule IV
16Admiral
Brett P. Giroir
15 February 2018Incumbent2 years, 290 days 
U.S. Public
Health Service
Commissioned Corps

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "PHSCC Uniforms". Archived from the original on 2008-05-13. Retrieved 2008-01-19.
  2. ^ a b "42 USC 207. Grades, ranks, and titles of commissioned corps". Retrieved 2008-01-19.
  3. ^ "Regular Corps Assimilation Program" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-05-08. Retrieved 2008-01-19.
  4. ^ a b [1] Records of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health [OASH].
  5. ^ "Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH)". HHS.gov. 2016-03-30. Retrieved 2018-10-17.
  6. ^ "Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (ASH)". 2010-09-22. Archived from the original on 2010-09-22. Retrieved 2018-10-17.
  7. ^ Received a recess appointment on January 1, 2016 to continue serving as the Acting Assistant Secretary for Health until the end of fiscal year 2016.

External linksEdit