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Archduchess Magdalena of Austria

Archduchess Magdalena of Austria (German: Magdalena von Österreich-Habsburg) (August 14, 1532 in Innsbruck – September 10, 1590 in Hall in Tirol)[1] was a member of the House of Habsburg, and the founder and first abbess of the convent in Hall in Tirol.

BiographyEdit

Magdalena was the fourth daughter of fifteen children of Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor, and his wife Anne of Bohemia and Hungary.

During the lifetime of her father had expressed to Archduchess Magdalena and her younger sister Margaret the desire to remain unmarried and create a community of pious women. After her father's death in 1564, Magdalena took the vow of celibacy, and set out to found a "royal convent" in Hall in Tirol, where like-minded women - both aristocratic and bourgeois - could lead a reclusive, pious and God-fearing life under the supervision of the Jesuits.

Magdalena died in 1590 after a short sickness. She was buried in the Jesuit church in Hall in Tirol. In 1706, her remains were transferred to the convent church.

AncestorsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Profile on Darlene's Family Genealogy
  2. ^ a b c d Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Joanna" . Encyclopædia Britannica. 15 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
  3. ^ a b c d Priebatsch, Felix (1908), "Wladislaw II.", Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB) (in German), 54, Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 688–696
  4. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Philipp I. der Schöne von Oesterreich" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 112 – via Wikisource.
  5. ^ a b c Boureau, Alain (1995). The Lord's First Night: The Myth of the Droit de Cuissage. Translated by Cochrane, Lydia G. The University of Chicago Press. p. 96.
  6. ^ a b c Noubel, P., ed. (1877). Revue de l'Agenais [Review of the Agenais]. 4. Société académique d'Agen. p. 497.
  7. ^ a b Holland, Arthur William (1911). "Maximilian I. (emperor)" . In Chisholm, Hugh (ed.). Encyclopædia Britannica. 17 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
  8. ^ a b Poupardin, René (1911). "Charles, called The Bold, duke of Burgundy" . In Chisholm, Hugh (ed.). Encyclopædia Britannica. 5 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
  9. ^ a b Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Ferdinand V. of Castile and Leon and II. of Aragon" . Encyclopædia Britannica. 10 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
  10. ^ a b Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Isabella of Castile" . Encyclopædia Britannica. 14 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
  11. ^ a b Casimir IV, King of Poland at the Encyclopædia Britannica
  12. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1860). "Habsburg, Elisabeth von Oesterreich (Königin von Polen)" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 6. p. 167 – via Wikisource.