Archbishopric of Belgrade and Karlovci

Archbishopric of Belgrade and Karlovci (Serbian Cyrillic: Архиепископија београдско-карловачка) is the central or patriarchal eparchy of the Serbian Orthodox Church, with seat in Belgrade, Serbia.[1] The head of the eparchy is the Serbian patriarch.[citation needed]

Archbishopric of Belgrade and Karlovci

Архиепископија београдско-карловачка
Temple Saint Sava.jpg
Cathedral of Saint Sava, Belgrade, the largest Orthodox church in the Balkans
Location
TerritoryBelgrade
HeadquartersBelgrade, Serbia
Information
DenominationEastern Orthodox
Sui iuris churchSerbian Orthodox Church
Established1931
LanguageChurch Slavonic
Serbian
Current leadership
BishopVacant
Map
Map of Eparchies of Serbian Orthodox Church (including Orthodox Ohrid Archbishopric)-en.svg

HistoryEdit

History of the eparchy, since 1920Edit

In 1920, after the unification of all Serbian ecclesiastical provinces into one united Serbian Orthodox Church, old Eparchy of Syrmia with its seat in Sremski Karlovci came under direct administration of the archbishop of Belgrade who was also the Serbian patriarch. Formal unification of two eparchies was completed in 1931 when Archbishopric of Belgrade was joined with the Eparchy of Syrmia into the Archbishopric of Belgrade and Karlovci.[citation needed] In that time, the city of Pančevo was transferred from Eparchy of Vršac to the Archeparchy of Belgrade and Karlovci. In 1947, Eparchy of Syrmia and Eparchy of Šumadija were excluded from the Archbishopric of Belgrade and Karlovci and were transformed into separate organizational units. The city of Pančevo was returned to the Eparchy of Banat. Although, the name of the Archbishopric of Belgrade and Karlovci includes the name of the town of Karlovci (Sremski Karlovci), this town is today part of the Eparchy of Syrmia and not of the Archbishopric of Belgrade and Karlovci.

Historical background, before 1920Edit

Eparchy of Belgrade is one of the oldest ecclesiastical institutions in this part of Europe. Ancient Bishopric of Singidunum was an important ecclesiastical center of the late Roman Empire during 4th and 5th century. Its bishops Ursacius and Secundianus were actively involved in religious controversies over Arianism.[2] That ancient bishopric finally collapsed after 584 when ancient Singidunum was finally destroyed by Avars.

After the Christianization of Slavs, eparchy was renewed as late as 9th century. First medieval Bishop of Belgrade who is known by name was Sergije in 878.[3] Since 1018 it belonged to the Eastern Orthodox Archbishopric of Ohrid.[4] At the end of the 13th century, Belgrade became the capital city of Serbian king Stefan Dragutin and Eparchy of Belgrad came under jurisdiction of Serbian Orthodox Church. At the beginning of the 15th century, during the rule of Serbian despot Stefan Lazarević,[5] metropolitans of Belgrade were among most influential hierarchs of the Serbian Patriarchate of Peć. Belgrade fell under Turkish rule in 1521, but Serbian Patriarchate was renewed in 1557 with its seat in the Patriarchal Monastery of Peć. During 16th and 17th centuries, Serbian bishops of Belgrade were styled as "Metropolitans of Belgrade and Srem".

At the end of the 17th century, regions of Belgrade and Srem were separated. In 1708, when autonomous Serbian Metropolitanate in Habsburg Monarchy was created, Eparchy of Srem became archdiocese of the Metropolitan, whose seat was in Sremski Karlovci. Eparchy of Srem remained part of Metropolitanate of Karlovci until 1920. On the other hand, after the abolition of the Serbian Patriarchate of Peć in 1766, Eparchy of Belgrade came under direct jurisdiction of the Patriarchate of Constantinople.

In 1831, Eastern Orthodox Church in Principality of Serbia gained its autonomy from the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, and Belgrade became the seat of the archbishop who was now metropolitan of Belgrade. In that time, territory of the archeparchy was very large and included regions of present-day eparchies of Šumadija and Braničevo.

In 1920, the Metropolitanate of Belgrade merged with other Serbian ecclesiastical provinces to form united Serbian Orthodox Church. In the same year, region of Braničevo was separated from the archeparchy and old Eparchy of Braničevo was restored. In 1947, region of Šumadija was also separated from the archeparchy and new Eparchy of Šumadija was created. Since then, the archbishopric was reduced to the inner limits of the City of Belgrade.

MonasteriesEdit

There are 12 monasteries within the Archbishopric.[citation needed]

HeadsEdit

During the long history of the ecclesiastical seat of Belgrade, many bishops, metropolitans, archbishops and finally patriarchs were seated on the throne of this eparchy.

Bishops and metropolitans of Belgrade, until 1766Edit

Name Tenure Notes
Sergije [3] (around 878) Bishop of Belgrade
Jovan [6] (around 1317) Bishop of Mačva and Belgrade
Isidor [7] (around 1415-1423) during the reign of Serbian despot Stefan Lazarević
Grigorije [8] (around 1438-1440) during the reign of Serbian despot Đurađ Branković
Joanikije [9] (around 1479) received royal charter from king Matthias Corvinus of Hungary
Filotej [10] (since 1481) during the time of titular Serbian despot Vuk Grgurević
Teofan [11] (around 1509) he established ties with Russia
Saint Maksim Branković [12] (died 1516) Metropolitan of Belgrade and Srem
Roman [13] (around 1532) under Archbishopric of Ohrid
Longin [14] (around 1545-1548) under Archbishopric of Ohrid
Makarije [15] (around 1589) Metropolitan of Belgrade and Srem
Joakim [16] (around 1607-1611) Metropolitan of Belgrade and Srem
Avesalom [17] (around 1631-1632) Metropolitan of Belgrade and Srem
Ilarion [18] (around 1644-1662) Metropolitan of Belgrade and Srem
Jefrem [19] (around 1662-1672) Metropolitan of Belgrade and Srem
Elevterije [20] (around 1673-1678) Metropolitan of Belgrade and Srem
Pajsije [21] (around 1680-1681) Metropolitan of Belgrade and Srem
Simeon Ljubibratić [22] (1682—1690) migrated to Hungary in 1690, with Serbian patriarch Arsenije III Crnojević
Hadži-Simeon (fl. 1694)
Mihailo [23] (око 1699—1705) installed by new Serbian patriarch Kalinik I
Mojsije Petrović [24] (1713—1730) since 1718. under Habsburg rule, and since 1726. also Metropolitan of Karlovci
Vikentije Jovanović [25] (1731—1737) Metropolitan of Belgrade and Karlovci
Sophronius [26] (around 1740—1745) ethnic Greek, Metropolitan of Belgrade
Vikentije Stefanović [27] (around 1753) ethnic Serb, Metropolitan of Belgrade, later became Serbian Patriarch
Callinicus [28] (around 1759—1761) ethnic Greek, Metropolitan of Belgrade

Under direct jurisdiction of Constantinople (1766–1831)Edit

No. Primate Portrait Personal name Reigned from Reigned until Title Notes
1 Jeremiah
Јеремија
Jeremiah
  1766 1784 Metropolitan of Belgrade Ethnic Greek
2 Dionysius I
Дионисије I
  1785 1791 Metropolitan of Belgrade Ethnic Greek
3 Methodius
Методије
  1791 1801 Metropolitan of Belgrade Ethnic Greek
4 Leontius
Леонтије
  Leontije Lambrović
Леонтије Ламбровић
1801 1813 Metropolitan of Belgrade Ethnic Greek
5 Dionysius II
Дионисије II
  Dimitrije
Димитрије
1813 1815 Metropolitan of Belgrade Ethnic Serb
6 Agathangelus
Агатангел
  1815 1825 Metropolitan of Belgrade Ethnic Greek
7 Kiril
Кирил
  1825 1827 Metropolitan of Belgrade Ethnic Greek
8 Anthimus
Антим
  1827 1831 Metropolitan of Belgrade Ethnic Greek

Autonomous (1831–1879) and Autocephalous (1879–1920)Edit

No. Primate Portrait Personal name Reigned from Reigned until Title Notes
1 Melentije Pavlović
Мелентије
Melenthius
  Melentije Pavlović
Мелентије Павловић
1831 1833 Archbishop of Belgrade and Metropolitan of Serbia Serb
2 Petar Jovanović
Петар
Peter
  Pavle Jovanović
Павле Јовановић
1833 1859 Archbishop of Belgrade and Metropolitan of Serbia
3 Mihailo Jovanović
Михаило
Michael
  Miloje Jovanović
Милоје Јовановић
1859 1881 Archbishop of Belgrade and Metropolitan of Serbia First tenure
4 Teodosije Mraović
Теодосије
Theodosius
  Teodor Mraović
Теодор Мраовић
1883 1889 Archbishop of Belgrade and Metropolitan of Serbia
-- Mihailo Jovanović
Михаило
Michael
  Miloje Jovanović
Милоје Јовановић
1889 1898 Archbishop of Belgrade and Metropolitan of Serbia Second tenure
5 Inokentije Pavlović
Инокентије
Innocentius
  Jakov Pavlović
Јаков Павловић
1898 1905 Archbishop of Belgrade and Metropolitan of Serbia
6 Dimitrije
Димитрије
Dimitrius
  Dimitrije Pavlović
Димитрије Павловић
1905 1920 Archbishop of Belgrade and Metropolitan of Serbia Archbishop of Peć, Metropolitan of Belgrade and Karlovci, and Serbian Patriarch (1920–1930)

Metropolitans of Belgrade and Karlovci (1920–present)Edit

Serbian Patriarchs, Heads of the Holy Patriarchal See of Belgrade (1920–present)
Regnal title: Archbishop of Peć, Metropolitan of Belgrade and Karlovci, and Serbian Patriarch[B]
No. Primate Portrait Personal name Reigned from Reigned until Place of birth Notes
1 Dimitrije [I]
Димитрије (I)
Dimitrius (I)
  Dimitrije Pavlović
Димитрије Павловић
12 September 1920 6 April 1930 Požarevac, Principality of Serbia First Patriarch of the reunified Serbian church
2 Varnava [I]
Варнава (I)
Barnabas (I)
  Petar Rosić
Петар Росић
12 May 1930 23 July 1937 Pljevlja, Ottoman Empire Some believe he may have been poisoned
3 Gavrilo [V]
Гaврилo (V)
Gabriel (V)
  Gavrilo Dožić
Гaврилo Дoжић
21 February 1938 7 May 1950 Vrujci, Principality of Montenegro Known unofficially as Gavrilo V Dožić-Medenica
4 Vikentije [II]
Викентије (II)
Vicentius (II)
  Vitomir Prodanov
Витомир Проданов
1 July 1950 5 July 1958 Bačko Petrovo Selo, Austria-Hungary Not known as Vikentije II but entered just as Vikentije. Some believe he may have been second poisoned Patriarch
5 German [II]
Герман (II)
Herman (II)
  Hranislav Đorić
Хранислав Ђорић
14 September 1958 30 November 1990 Jošanička Banja, Kingdom of Serbia Longest reigning Patriarch and only retired Patriarch during his life
6 Pavle [II]
Павле (II)
Paul (II)
  Gojko Stojčević
Гојко Стојчевић
1 December 1990 15 November 2009 Kućanci, Austria-Hungary Not known as Pavle II but entered just as Pavle
7 Irinej [I]
Иринеј (I)
Irenaeus (I)
  Miroslav Gavrilović
Мирослав Гавриловић
23 January 2010 20 November 2020 Vidova, Kingdom of Yugoslavia

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ History of the Archbishopric (in Serbian) Archived February 18, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Калић 1967, pp. 18-20.
  3. ^ a b Калић 1967, pp. 27, 30.
  4. ^ Bulić 2013, p. 221-222.
  5. ^ Engel 2001, pp. 232-233.
  6. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 239.
  7. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 208-209.
  8. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 139.
  9. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 232.
  10. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 497.
  11. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 490.
  12. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 299-300.
  13. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 417.
  14. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 286.
  15. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 297.
  16. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 228.
  17. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 7.
  18. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 194.
  19. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 222.
  20. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 184.
  21. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 391.
  22. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 451.
  23. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 327.
  24. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 333-337.
  25. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 70-73.
  26. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 462.
  27. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 73.
  28. ^ Вуковић 1996, p. 273.

LiteratureEdit