Anita Gregory

Anita Gregory (née Kohsen; 9 June 1925 – 7 November 1984) was a German-born British psychologist and parapsychologist.[1] Gregory was a lecturer at the Polytechnic of North London. She was a member of the Society for Psychical Research and conducted experiments with the British psychic Matthew Manning.[1]

Anita Gregory
Born
Anita Kohsen

9 June 1925
Died7 November 1984(1984-11-07) (aged 59)
OccupationPsychologist, parapsychologist
Known forEnfield Poltergeist
Spouse(s)
(m. 1954; died 1964)

She fled Nazi Germany due to the persecution of the Jews there. Her husband from 1954 was C.C.L. Gregory.

Enfield PoltergeistEdit

Gregory, who investigated the Enfield Poltergeist case, stated it had been "overrated", characterizing several episodes of the girl's behavior as "suspicious" and speculated that the girls had "staged" some incidents for the benefit of reporters seeking a sensational story.[2] John Beloff, a former president of the SPR, investigated and suggested Janet was practicing ventriloquism. Both Beloff and Gregory came to the conclusion that Janet and Margaret were playing tricks on the investigators.[3] According to Gregory, a video camera in the room next door caught Janet bending spoons and attempting to bend an iron bar.[4][5]

The Society for Psychical Research did not publish her critical report on the Enfield case.[6] Gregory described the evidence from the case as "greatly exaggerated" and "pathetic".[7]

PublicationsEdit

  • The Strange Case of Rudi Schneider (1985)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Anita Kohsen Gregory Gale Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology via Answers.com
  2. ^ Nickell, Joe. "Enfield Poltergeist". August 2012. Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. Retrieved 3 May 2015.
  3. ^ Clarkson, Michael. (2006). Poltergeists: Examining Mysteries of the Paranormal. Firefly Books. p. 131. ISBN 978-1554071593
  4. ^ Guiley, Rosemary (1994). The Guinness Encyclopedia of Ghosts and Spirits. Guinness World Records Limited. p. 109. "A video camera set up in the room next door caught Janet bending spoons and attempting to bend an iron bar in an entirely normal manner, then bouncing up and down on the bed while she made little flapping movements with her hands." ISBN 978-0851127484
  5. ^ Clarkson, Michael. (2006). Poltergeists: Examining Mysteries of the Paranormal. Firefly Books. p. 135. ISBN 978-1554071593 "Anita Gregory, of the Society for Psychical Research, who had spent just a short time at the Hodgson home, said the mysterious men's voices were simply the result of Janet and Margaret putting bed sheets to their mouths. In addition, Gregory said that a video camera had caught Janet attempting to bend spoons and an iron bar by force and “practicing” levitation by bouncing up and down on her bed."
  6. ^ Couttie, Bob. (1988). Forbidden Knowledge: The Paranormal Paradox. Lutterworth Press. p. 64. ISBN 978-0-7188-2686-4 "The Society for Psychical Research has been forced to suppress one extremely critical report on the Enfield case by the late Anita Gregory for fear of a libel action. She says: 'The Enfield case... unfortunately withers away on closer inspection.'"
  7. ^ Storr, Will. (2015). "The Real Story of the Enfield Haunting". The Telegraph. Retrieved 3 May 2015.