Ame-no-Koyane

Ama-no-Koyane-no-mikoto (天児屋命, 天児屋根命) is a kami and a male deity in Japanese mythology and Shinto. He is the ancestor of the Nakatomi clan, and Fujiwara no Kamatari, the founder of the famous Fujiwara clan.[5]

Ame-no-Koyane
Japanese天児屋命
Major cult center
TextsKojiki, Nihon Shoki, Izumo-no-kuni Fudoki
Personal information
ParentsKamimusubi
Children

MythologyEdit

According to Nihon Shoki, Ame-no-Koyane was "the first in charge of divine affairs, for which reason he was made to serve by performing the Greater Divination." He was commanded by Amaterasu to guard the divine mirror, and was known as the "Imperial Aide" at the Imperial Palace, being in charge of divine affairs of the palace.[6]

According to Japanese mythology, Ame-no-Koyane performed a ritual prayer to the sun goddess Amaterasu to call her out of the cave of Amano-Iwato and bring light back to the world, after Susanoo, the god of storms, drove her away.[5] During tenson kōrin, he acted as one of the five gods descending from heaven accompanying Ninigi, thus becoming the ancestor of Nakatomi clan.[7]

GenealogyEdit

According to Kogo Shūi and Kashima Shrine’s genealogy, Ame-no-Koyane is the son of the creator deity Kamimusubi, one of the first three gods to come into existence.[6][8] However, according to Nihon Shoki, he is the son of Kogotomusubi.[6]

ShrinesEdit

Ame-no-Koyane is worshipped at:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Suzuki, Matoshi. Izu Sukune Keizu Hyakkakeizuko「伊豆宿禰系図」『百家系図稿』1st book
  2. ^ Shibata, Joue. Saitama Sōsho. (1929) Volume 1: Chichibu Shi, p 111, Chichibu hikomikoto o keizu 『埼玉叢書. 第1巻』内『秩父志』内111頁「秩父彦命御系図」. Sanmeisha
  3. ^ Shibata, Joue. Saitama Sōsho. (1929) Volume 1: Chichibu Shi, p 111, Chichibu hikomikoto o keizu 『埼玉叢書. 第1巻』内『秩父志』内111頁「秩父彦命御系図」. Sanmeisha
  4. ^ Nakata. Akahori, Aoki, Hori-shi: Shokeifu, 3rd book「赤堀、青木、堀氏」『諸系譜』
  5. ^ a b Mypaedia, Amenokoyane. Japan: Heibonsha. 1995. OCLC 38516410.
  6. ^ a b c "Encyclopedia of Shinto: Kami in Classic Texts: Amenokoyane". Kokugakuin University. Establishment of a National Learning Institute for the Dissemination of Research on Shinto and Japanese Culture. Retrieved 2021-03-27.
  7. ^ Ueda, Masaaki (2001). Nihon Jinmei Daijiten, Amenokoyane. Japan: Kōdansha. ISBN 4062108003. OCLC 50718841.
  8. ^ Tanaka. Kashima Daiguji Keizu, Shokeifu「鹿嶋大宮司系図」『諸系譜』. 1. Japan.

External linksEdit