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Alexandros Mavrogenis Bey was the Ottoman-appointed Prince of Samos from 1902 to 1904.

Alexandros Magrogenis
Alexandros Mavrogentis.jpg
Prince of Samos
In office
1902–1904
Preceded byMichail Grigoriadis
Succeeded byIoannis Vithynos
Ottoman envoy to the United States
In office
1887–1896
Preceded byRüstem Effendi
Succeeded byMustafa Tahsin Bey

A member of the Mavrogenis family [el], his father was Spyridon Mavrogenis Pasha, the personal physician of the Ottoman Sultan Abdul Hamid II.[1]

A Phanariot,[1] he was a secretary to the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire and the Ottoman minister to the United States, before he was appointed governor of Samos,[2] in March 1902.[citation needed] Sinan Kuneralp, author of "Ottoman Diplomatic and Consular Personnel in the United States of America, 1867-1917," described him as "well-connected".[1]

While minister to the U.S. he examined activities of Armenian political operatives. Kuneralp wrote that Alexandros Mavrogenis was "diligent" in this task.[1] He had the nickname "Prince of Envoys" as he spent a lot of funds on recreational activities.[1]

When relations between Spyridon and Abdul Hamid declined, Alexandros lost his ambassadorial position.[1] Armenians in the United States had a favorable reception to his departure.[3] On being appointed to the office of Prince of Samos, he was well-intentioned and wanted to work for the progress and good of Samos but fell short of these noble intentions.[citation needed]

However, he was an extremely nervous and timid man and because of the situation with the quarreling political factions on the island, which left no room for wise administration. He ruled strictly, but after elections to the Samian Parliament, the party he supported lost and he was dismissed.[citation needed]

He founded the Mavrogenios Professional School of Malagari and also ordered built the marble fountain of the monastery of Zoodohos Pigi.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f Kuneralp, Sinan. "Ottoman Diplomatic and Consular Personnel in the United States of America, 1867-1917." In: Criss, Nur Bilge, Selçuk Esenbel, Tony Greenwood, and Louis Mazzari (editors). American Turkish Encounters: Politics and Culture, 1830-1989 (EBSCO Ebook Academic Collection). Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 12 July 2011. ISBN 144383260X, 9781443832601. Start: p. 100. CITED: 102.
  2. ^ Anogianakis, George. "Reflections of Western Thinking on Nineteenth-Century Ottoman Thought: A Critique of the 'Hard-Problem' by Spyridon Mavrogenis, a Nineteenth Century Physiologist" (Chapter 6). In: Smith, C.U.M. (Aston University) and Harry Whitaker (Northern Michigan University) (editors). Brain, Mind and Consciousness in the History of Neuroscience. Springer Science and Business, 23 April 2014. ISBN 9401787743, 9789401787741. p. 96.
  3. ^ Kuneralp, Sinan. "Ottoman Diplomatic and Consular Personnel in the United States of America, 1867-1917." In: Criss, Nur Bilge, Selçuk Esenbel, Tony Greenwood, and Louis Mazzari (editors). American Turkish Encounters: Politics and Culture, 1830-1989 (EBSCO Ebook Academic Collection). Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 12 July 2011. ISBN 144383260X, 9781443832601. Start: p. 100. CITED: 107. "7 Armenian committees in Boston rejoiced when he was recalled in 1896: HR/MTV-392-65" - Footnote seven is on p. 102 referring to Mavrogenis.