Advanced Digital Corporation

Advanced Digital Corporation (ADC) was a privately owned[1] American computer company based in California, active from the 1980s to the 1990s.[2][3] The company was founded by 1980 by a group of engineers, in order to market their single-user and multi-user expansion cards and peripherals for S-100–based computers.[2]

Advanced Digital Corporation
ADC
Company typePrivate
Founded1980; 44 years ago (1980) in Garden Grove, California
Defunct1990; 34 years ago (1990)
FateBankruptcy
HeadquartersHuntington Beach, California (1983–1990)
Key people
Hossein Asadi (president)
ProductsComputer hardware and systems

In 1983, ADC introduced a pair of their own S-100 computers, the Super Six and the Super Star.[4][5] In 1984, they made the pivot to production of expansion cards for the IBM Personal Computer,[2] with one (the PC II, co-produced by Link Technologies of Fremont) allowing the IBM PC to be used as a multi-user platform, with as many as 32 concurrent users.[6][7] Toward the late 1980s, they introduced their own 386SX-based PC compatible systems under the PowerLite name, to critical acclaim in the tech press.[8][9] ADC was initially based in Garden Grove, California, employing 35 by mid-1983.[10] In late 1983, they moved to Huntington Beach.[11] By April 1984, their employee headcount reached 75.[12] Its president was Hossein Asadi (born 1961, also known as Hossein Asadibagheri).[13][14][15] The company entered bankruptcy in 1990.[3]

Their Huntington Beach headquarters were the subject of an armed robbery in September 1988, with Asadi being bound and gagged while various merchandise was stolen. Asadi sustained no physical injuries.[15]

References edit

  1. ^ Staff writer (May 1, 1989). "Advanced Digital Corp". PC Week. Ziff-Davis. 6 (17): 109 – via Gale.
  2. ^ a b c Derfler, Frank J., Jr. (1988). "Advanced Digital Corp". PC Magazine. Ziff-Davis. 7 (14): 308–315 – via Google Books.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  3. ^ a b "Bankruptcies". Orange County Register: C5. November 5, 1990 – via ProQuest.
  4. ^ Staff writer (August 8, 1983). "Advanced Digital Unwraps Computer". Computerworld. CW Communications. 17 (32): 81 – via the Internet Archive.
  5. ^ Staff writer (August 22, 1983). "S-100-Based System Features Fixed/Removable Disk Drive". Computerworld. CW Communications. 17 (34): 61 – via the Internet Archive.
  6. ^ Morrissey, Jane (September 1, 1987). "LAN operating systems find new role in PC-based multiuser environments". PC Week. Ziff-Davis. 4 (35): 35 – via Gale.
  7. ^ Staff writer (August 27, 1986). "LINK Tech gets $5 million order". The San Francisco Examiner: C1 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ Satchell, Stephen (December 1989). "Downsizing the Desktop". Byte. McGraw-Hill. 14 (13): 179–182 – via Gale.
  9. ^ Mendelson, Edward (January 30, 1990). "Powerlite 386SX". PC Magazine. Ziff-Davis. 9 (2): 100 – via Google Books.
  10. ^ "Vendor Profiles". Computerworld. CW Communications. 17 (40A): V-1. October 5, 1983 – via the Internet Archive.
  11. ^ Staff writer (October 10, 1983). "Micro Offered With Winnie For 100% Backup". Computerworld. CW Communications. 17 (41): 80 – via the Internet Archive.
  12. ^ "Vendor Profiles". Computerworld. CW Communications. 18 (16A): V-1. April 18, 1984 – via the Internet Archive.
  13. ^ Bermar, Amy (July 11, 1988). "Does a bad idea constitute grounds for a lawsuit? PR agency Regis McKenna is about to find out". PC Week. Ziff-Davis. 5 (28): 133 – via Gale.
  14. ^ Pietrucha, Bill (October 29, 1997). "Novell Breaks Software Counterfeiting Ring". Newsbytes. The Washington Post Company – via Gale.
  15. ^ a b Staff writer (September 18, 1988). "Three Gunmen Rob Computer Company". Los Angeles Times. Times-Mirror Company: 4.2 – via Newspapers.com.

External links edit