10th century in Ireland

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Events from the 10th century in Ireland.

10th century in Ireland
Other centuries
9th century | 10th century | 11th century

900sEdit

900
902
  • Dublin has been abandoned - the end of the Longphort phase - the term used by modern scholars to refer to the earliest period of Viking settlement at Dublin[1]
904
908
909

910sEdit

911
911 or 914
  • A large Viking fleet arrives in Waterford and a second period of Viking raids begins.[3] The Vikings also established a base in Waterford.[4]
916
917
  • The Annals of Ulster records the arrival of two Viking fleets in Ireland in 917, one led by Ragnall and the other by Sigtrygg, both of the Uí Ímair kindred. They fought a battle against Niall Glundub in which the Irish were routed, and according to the annals Sigtrygg then "entered Áth Cliath", i.e. Dublin, which we must assume means that he took possession of it.[5] Ragnall Uí Ímair went on to Scotland,[6] and then conquered York and became king there.
919
  • Niall Glúndub, overking of the Uí Néill, killed in the battle of Dublin.[3] He fell fighting the Dublin Norse at Islandbridge.[2]

920sEdit

922
925
926 or 941
  • Brian Boru (d.1014), future High King of Ireland is thought to have been born in 926 or in 941.
927
928

930sEdit

936

940sEdit

944
  • Death of Donnchad Donn mac Flainn, King of Mide; he is succeeded by Oengus mac Donnchada.

950sEdit

956
  • Death of Congalach Cnogba, High King of Ireland, of the Síl nÁedo Sláine, part of the Southern Uí Néill. Domnall ua Néill becomes overking of the Uí Néill and reigns until his death in 980.[3]

960sEdit

960
964
968

970sEdit

970
  • A hoard of 43 silver and bronze items was left in a rocky cleft deep in Dunmore Caves near Kilkenny. It consisted of silver, ingots and conical buttons woven from fine silver and was discovered in 1999.
976
  • Mathgamain, leader of the Dál gCais from east Clare, is killed.[10]
  • Death of Muirchertach mac Mael Sechnaill, King of Mide.
977
977/8
978

980sEdit

980
  • Death of Domnall ua Néill, overking of the Uí Néill, who had reigned since 956:[3] he is succeeded by Mael Seachnaill II, who reigned until his death in 1022[11]
  • Battle of Tara, at which Mael Seachnaill II defeats a Viking army from Dublin.[10]
981
  • Mael Seachnaill II besieges and takes the city of Dublin from the Vikings and imposes a heavy tribute on them.[10]
982
  • The King of Munster, Brian Boru starts extending his authority from his base around Limerick up the River Shannon. By doing so, he comes into conflict with High King Mael Seachnaill II whose power base is the Province of Meath. It is that start of a conflict that lasts until 997.
985
986
989
  • Sigtrygg Silkbeard becomes King of Dublin

990sEdit

990
997
  • Brian Boru and Mael Seachnaill II divide Ireland between them[3]
998
  • King Mael Mordha of Leinster, rebelled against the High King of Ireland, Brian Boru.
999

1000sEdit

1000
  • Brian Boru led a combined Munster-Leinster-Dublin army in an attack on High King Máel Sechnaill II's home province of Meath.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Connolly, S.J. (1998). The Oxford Companion to Irish History. Oxford University Press. p. 329. ISBN 0-19-211695-9.
  2. ^ a b Moody, TW; Martin, FX, eds. (1967). The Course of Irish History. Cork, Ireland: The Mercier Press. pp. 59 & 98.
  3. ^ a b c d e f The Oxford Illustrated History of Ireland. Foster, RF. Oxford University Press, Oxford. 1989
  4. ^ Moody, TW; Martin, FX, eds. (1967). The Course of Irish History. Cork, Ireland: The Mercier Press. p. 102.
  5. ^ Annals of Ulster (AU) 917.3,4,5
  6. ^ AU 918.4
  7. ^ Connolly, S.J. (1998). The Oxford Companion to Irish History. Oxford University Press. p. 580. ISBN 0-19-211695-9.
  8. ^ Moody, TW; Martin, FX, eds. (1967). The Course of Irish History. Cork, Ireland: The Mercier Press. p. 369.
  9. ^ Moody, TW; Martin, FX, eds. (1967). The Course of Irish History. Cork, Ireland: The Mercier Press. p. 103.
  10. ^ a b c d Moody, TW; Martin, FX, eds. (1967). The Course of Irish History. Cork, Ireland: The Mercier Press. p. 104.
  11. ^ The Concise History of Ireland. Duffy, S. Gill & Macmillan, Dublin. 2005