2017 Taiwan blackout

Blackout in Kaohsiung.

On 15 August 2017 at 4:52 p.m., massive blackout hit northern half of Taiwan, affecting 6.68 million households. Electricity rationing was implemented at 6:00 p.m. and the blackout fully ended at 9:40 p.m.[1]

EventEdit

Power plantEdit

During the power supply equipment replacement for a control system of the metering station at Tatan Power Plant in Guanyin District, Taoyuan City by a contractor of CPC Corporation, the worker did not switch the system from auto mode to manual mode before starting the work, causing the two gas supply pipe valves to close and stop the supply of liquefied natural gas fuel source for two minutes.[2] Six generators of the power plant fully tripped due to that, disrupting the supply of 4 GW of electricity.[3]

PublicEdit

Residents in major cities in northern Taiwan reported slow-moving traffic, stalled lifts or gondolas, and no air conditioning.[4][5][6] Some emergency services were called to rescue trapped people and the police were manually directing traffic.[7] And before 2017 Summer Universiade.[8]

ReactionsEdit

Taipower responded by offering one day electricity charge cut from each household bill, which resulted in NT$270 million of revenue loss to the company.

President Tsai Ing-wen apologized to the people of Taiwan through her Facebook page, stating that electricity supply is a national security issue.[9]

Economic Affairs Minister Lee Chih-kung resigned shortly afterwards to take responsibility. Premier Lin Chuan appointed Deputy Minister Shen Jong-chin as acting Minister to replace Lee.[10]

CPC Corporation Chairperson Chen Chin-te resigned three days afterwards to take responsibility of the event which was then replaced by acting Chairperson Yang Wei-fuu.[11] His resignation also was accepted by Premier Lin.[12]

DamagesEdit

The blackout caused at least US$3 million of loss or damages to over 150 companies in industrial parks and export processing zones.[13]

AftermathsEdit

President Tsai promised that her administration would conduct a comprehensive review of the electrical grid of Taiwan to reexamine and strengthen it.[14]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Electricity supply restored around Taiwan: Taipower - Economics - FOCUS TAIWAN - CNA ENGLISH NEWS". focustaiwan.tw. Retrieved 4 November 2017.
  2. ^ "Mishap Triggers Taiwan Blackout as Power Policies Draw Scrutiny". 16 August 2017. Retrieved 4 November 2017 – via www.bloomberg.com.
  3. ^ "Keeping Taiwan from Going Dark - Taiwan Business TOPICS". amcham.com.tw. 13 October 2017. Retrieved 4 November 2017.
  4. ^ http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/minister-resigns-over-massive-taiwan-blackout-reports-9125906
  5. ^ https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3232877
  6. ^ http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/widespread-power-outages-hit-taiwan
  7. ^ http://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/2106935/taiwanese-minister-resigns-after-error-power-plant-plunges-668000
  8. ^ 王敏旭 (2017-08-15). "全台大停電 世大運美國籃球隊受影響". 聯合新聞網. Archived from the original on 2017-08-16.
  9. ^ "Massive Power Cut Affects Millions in Taiwan". Time. Retrieved 4 November 2017.
  10. ^ https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3232877
  11. ^ "UPDATE 1-Chief of Taiwan gas supplier CPC resigns after power blackout". 18 August 2017. Retrieved 4 November 2017 – via Reuters.
  12. ^ "Taiwan accepts resignation of gas supplier chief after blackout". 18 August 2017. Retrieved 4 November 2017 – via Reuters.
  13. ^ "Taiwan power outage affected 151 companies, caused $3 million in damages". 17 August 2017. Retrieved 4 November 2017 – via Reuters.
  14. ^ hermesauto (16 August 2017). "Taiwan to review electrical grid after flawed power supply replacement process caused massive blackout". straitstimes.com. Retrieved 4 November 2017.