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The 2006 German Grand Prix (formally the Mobil 1 Grand Prix of Germany) was a Formula One motor race held at the Hockenheimring on 30 July 2006. The 67-lap race was the twelfth round of the 2006 Formula One season and was won by Michael Schumacher. The Grand Prix weekend got off to a controversial start when the mass damper system fitted by Renault was deemed legal by the FIA appointed stewards, despite the FIA banning the use of these devices. The FIA appealed against the steward's decision, but Renault then withdrew the system after Friday practice to avoid further sanctions.

2006 German Grand Prix
Race 12 of 18 in the 2006 Formula One World Championship
The Hockenheimring
The Hockenheimring
Race details
Date July 30, 2006
Official name LXVIII Grosser Mobil 1 Preis von Deutschland
Location Hockenheimring, Hockenheim, Germany
Course Permanent racing facility
Course length 4.574 km (2.842 mi)
Distance 67 laps, 306.458 km (190.424 mi)
Weather Sunny, warm
Pole position
Driver McLaren-Mercedes
Time 1:14.070
Fastest lap
Driver Germany Michael Schumacher Ferrari
Time 1:16.357 on lap 17
Podium
First
  • Germany Michael Schumacher
Ferrari
Second Ferrari
Third
  • Finland Kimi Räikkönen
McLaren-Mercedes
David Coulthard qualified in the top ten in Red Bull Racing's second season of Formula One.

Kimi Räikkönen took pole position, but it proved artificial as McLaren had inadvertently not put enough fuel as intended in his car before qualifying. In the race, Räikkönen's early pitstop left him unable to challenge at the front, and the way was left clear for Ferrari to score a dominant one-two. Perhaps due to the damper issue, Renault were not competitive; it was the first time in 2006 that neither of their cars finished the race on the podium.

Sakon Yamamoto made his Formula One début at the Grand Prix, starting from pit lane after changing chassis after the qualifying session. He was not the only one to suffer changes after qualifying, as Jarno Trulli and Christijan Albers both had to change engines, incurring ten-place penalties. A nightmare weekend for Albers was summed up with his disqualification, along with team-mate Tiago Monteiro, as the Midlands were disqualified after the race for having illegally flexing rear wings.[1] The race also saw the last appearance by 1997 champion Jacques Villeneuve, who blamed the split on the "lack of assurances about his short-term future with BMW Sauber".[2][3][4] Robert Kubica was promoted internally at BMW to drive at the Hungaroring because Villeneuve was still recovering from the after-effects of his crash in Germany, and went on to race in all the remaining Grands Prix.

Contents

ClassificationEdit

QualifyingEdit

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Q1 Q2 Q3 Grid
1 3   Kimi Räikkönen McLaren-Mercedes 1:15.214 1:14.410 1:14.070 1
2 5   Michael Schumacher Ferrari 1:14.904 1:13.778 1:14.205 2
3 6   Felipe Massa Ferrari 1:14.412 1:14.094 1:14.569 3
4 12   Jenson Button Honda 1:15.869 1:14:378 1:14:862 4
5 2   Giancarlo Fisichella Renault 1:15.916 1:14.540 1:14.894 5
6 11   Rubens Barrichello Honda 1:15.757 1:14.652 1:14:934 6
7 1   Fernando Alonso Renault 1:15.518 1:14.746 1:15.282 7
8 7   Ralf Schumacher Toyota 1:15.789 1:14.743 1:15.923 8
9 4   Pedro de la Rosa McLaren-Mercedes 1:15.655 1:15.021 1:15.936 9
10 14   David Coulthard Red Bull-Ferrari 1:15.836 1:14.826 1:16.326 10
11 9   Mark Webber Williams-Cosworth 1:15.719 1:15.094 11
12 15   Christian Klien Red Bull-Ferrari 1:15.816 1:15.141 12
13 8   Jarno Trulli Toyota 1:15.430 1:15.150 201
14 17   Jacques Villeneuve BMW Sauber 1:16.281 1:15:329 13
15 10   Nico Rosberg Williams-Cosworth 1:16.183 1:15.380 14
16 16   Nick Heidfeld BMW Sauber 1:16.234 1:15.397 15
17 20   Vitantonio Liuzzi Toro Rosso-Cosworth 1:16.399 16
18 19   Christijan Albers MF1-Toyota 1:17.093 212
19 22   Takuma Sato Super Aguri-Honda 1:17.185 17
20 18   Tiago Monteiro MF1-Toyota 1:17.836 18
21 23   Sakon Yamamoto Super Aguri-Honda 1:20.444 PL3
22 21   Scott Speed Toro Rosso-Cosworth No time 19
Source:[5]
Notes
  • ^1Jarno Trulli qualified 13th but dropped ten places on the starting grid due to an engine change to his Toyota.
  • ^2Christijan Albers qualified 18th but dropped ten places on the starting grid due to an engine change to his MF1.
  • ^3Sakon Yamamoto started the race from the pit lane after changing the chassis of his Super Aguri after qualifying.

RaceEdit

 
Jacques Villeneuve walks away from his crashed F1.06 in his final F1 race.
Pos. No. Driver Constructor Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 5   Michael Schumacher Ferrari 67 1:27:51.693 2 10
2 6   Felipe Massa Ferrari 67 +0.720 3 8
3 3   Kimi Räikkönen McLaren-Mercedes 67 +13.206 1 6
4 12   Jenson Button Honda 67 +18.898 4 5
5 1   Fernando Alonso Renault 67 +23.707 7 4
6 2   Giancarlo Fisichella Renault 67 +24.814 5 3
7 8   Jarno Trulli Toyota 67 +26.544 20 2
8 15   Christian Klien Red Bull-Ferrari 67 +48.131 12 1
9 7   Ralf Schumacher Toyota 67 +1:00.351 8
10 20   Vitantonio Liuzzi Toro Rosso-Cosworth 66 +1 lap 16
11 14   David Coulthard Red Bull-Ferrari 66 +1 lap 10
12 21   Scott Speed Toro Rosso-Cosworth 66 +1 lap 19
Ret 9   Mark Webber Williams-Cosworth 59 Water Leak 11
Ret 22   Takuma Sato Super Aguri-Honda 38 Gearbox 17
Ret 17   Jacques Villeneuve BMW Sauber 30 Accident 13
Ret 11   Rubens Barrichello Honda 18 Engine 6
Ret 16   Nick Heidfeld BMW Sauber 9 Brakes 15
Ret 4   Pedro de la Rosa McLaren-Mercedes 2 Fuel Pump 9
Ret 23   Sakon Yamamoto Super Aguri-Honda 1 Driveshaft 22
Ret 10   Nico Rosberg Williams-Cosworth 0 Accident 14
DSQ 19   Christijan Albers MF1-Toyota 66 Disqualified1 21
DSQ 18   Tiago Monteiro MF1-Toyota 65 Disqualified1 18
Source:[6]
Notes

Championship standings after the raceEdit

  • Note: Only the top five positions are included for both sets of standings.
  • Bold text indicates competitors who still had a theoretical chance of becoming World Champion.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Midlands disqualified over rear-wing flex". formula1.com. Formula One Administration. 2006-06-30. Archived from the original on August 28, 2008. Retrieved 2010-08-09.
  2. ^ "Villeneuve parts company with BMW". BBC Sport. 7 August 2006. Retrieved 3 April 2009.
  3. ^ "Au revoir Jacques". GrandPrix.com. 2006-08-07. Archived from the original on 31 August 2006. Retrieved 2006-08-21.
  4. ^ "Kubica replaces Villeneuve". GrandPrix.com. 2006-08-01. Retrieved 2006-08-21.
  5. ^ Domenjoz, Luc; et al. Formula One Yearbook 2006-2007. Chronosports S.A. p. 158. ISBN 2-84707-110-5.
  6. ^ "2006 German Grand Prix - Race". Formula1.com. Formula1.com Limited. Archived from the original on 28 August 2014. Retrieved 27 December 2015.
  7. ^ a b "Germany 2006 - Championship • STATS F1". www.statsf1.com. Retrieved 18 March 2019.

External linksEdit