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The majority of the 2005 Rugby League Tri-Nations was played in Great Britain and Australasia. The final was played between Australia and New Zealand at Elland Road on Saturday 26 November. New Zealand won the match 24-0 and were crowned 2005 Tri-Nations champions, breaking Australia's 27-year undefeated international tournament record.

2005 (2005) Tri-Nations  ()
2005 Tri-Nations logo
Number of teams3
Host country United Kingdom
Winner New Zealand (1st title)

Matches played7
Attendance155,143 (22,163 per match)
Tries scored56 (8 per match)
Top scorerNew Zealand Stacey Jones[1] (42)
Top try scorersNew Zealand Clinton Toopi[1] (5)
New Zealand Jake Webster (5)
Australia Matt Cooper (5)
 < 2004
2006

The tournament was officially known as the 2005 Gillette Tri-Nations due to sponsorship from Gillette.

Contents

Participating teamsEdit

Each team was to play the other three twice during the round robin tournament. The top two finishing teams would then contest the final.

Team Nickname Coach Captain RLIF Rank
  Australia The Kangaroos Wayne Bennett Darren Lockyer 1
  Great Britain The Lions Brian Noble Jamie Peacock 2
  New Zealand The Kiwis Brian McClennan Ruben Wiki 3

OfficialsEdit

One referee from each participating nation was appointed to control matches in the Tri-Nations:

VenuesEdit

The games were played at the following venues in Australia, New Zealand and England.

Sydney Auckland London
Telstra Stadium Ericsson Stadium Loftus Road
Capacity: 83,500 Capacity: 30,000 Capacity: 18,439
     
Wigan Huddersfield Hull
JJB Stadium Galpharm Stadium KC Stadium
Capacity: 25,138 Capacity: 24,500 Capacity: 25,138
     

FinalEdit

The Tri-Nations Final was played in Leeds.

Leeds
Elland Road
Capacity: 37,890
 

ResultsEdit

Tournament matchesEdit

2005-10-15
Australia   28 – 38   New Zealand
Tries:
Brent Tate (2)
Mark Gasnier (2)
Andrew Johns
Matt King
Goals:
Craig Fitzgibbon (1/4)
Andrew Johns (1/2)
Report Tries:
Clinton Toopi (3)
Brent Webb
Nathan Cayless
Nigel Vagana
Goals:
Stacey Jones (7/7)
Telstra Stadium, Sydney
Attendance: 28,255[1]
Referee: Steve Ganson  


AUSTRALIA
1. Anthony Minichiello · 2. Matt King · 3. Mark Gasnier · 4. Brent Tate · 5. Timana Tahu · 6. Darren Lockyer (c) · 7. Andrew Johns · 8. Petero Civoniceva · 9. Danny Buderus · 10. Steve Price · 11. Luke O'Donnell · 12. Craig Fitzgibbon · 13. Ben Kennedy
Interchange: 14. Craig Gower · 15. Jason Ryles · 16. Andrew Ryan · 17. Trent Waterhouse
Coach: Wayne Bennett

NEW ZEALAND
1. Brent Webb · 2. Jake Webster · 3. Paul Whatuira · 4. Clinton Toopi · 5. Manu Vatuvei · 6. Nigel Vagana · 7. Stacey Jones · 8. Paul Rauhihi · 9. Lance Hohaia · 10. Ruben Wiki (c) · 11. David Kidwell · 12. Frank Pritchard · 13. Louis Anderson
Interchange: 14. David Faiumu · 15. Roy Asotasi · 16. Nathan Cayless · 17. David Solomona
Coach: Brian McClennan


2005-10-21
New Zealand   26 – 28   Australia
Tries:
Jake Webster (2)
Nigel Vagana
Motu Tony
David Faiumu
Goals:
Stacey Jones (3/6)
Report Tries:
Darren Lockyer (2)
Matt Cooper (2)
Mark Gasnier
Anthony Minichiello
Goals:
Craig Fitzgibbon (2/5)
Johns (0/1)
Ericsson Stadium, Auckland
Attendance: 15,400[1]
Referee: Steve Ganson  


NEW ZEALAND
1. Brent Webb · 2. Jake Webster · 3. Paul Whatuira · 4. Shontayne Hape · 5. Manu Vatuvei · 6. Nigel Vagana · 7. Stacey Jones · 8. Paul Rauhihi · 9. Motu Tony · 10. Ruben Wiki (c) · 11. David Kidwell · 12. David Solomona · 13. Louis Anderson
Interchange: 14. David Faiumu · 15. Roy Asotasi · 16. Iafeta Palea'aesina · 17. Tony Puletua
Coach: Brian McClennan

AUSTRALIA
1. Anthony Minichiello · 2. Matt King · 3. Mark Gasnier · 4. Matt Cooper · 5. Brent Tate · 6. Darren Lockyer (c) · 7. Andrew Johns · 8. Petero Civoniceva · 9. Danny Buderus · 10. Steve Price · 11. Luke O'Donnell · 12. Craig Fitzgibbon · 13. Ben Kennedy
Interchange: 14. Trent Barrett · 15. Jason Ryles · 16. Mark O'Meley · 17. Trent Waterhouse
Coach: Wayne Bennett


2005-10-29
Great Britain   26 – 42   New Zealand
Tries:
Paul Johnson (3)
Keith Senior
Goals:
Paul Deacon (1/1)
Kevin Sinfield (4/4)
Report Tries:
Brent Webb (2)
Clinton Toopi (2)
Manu Vatuvei
Jake Webster
Paul Rauhihi
Goals:
Stacey Jones (7/7)
Loftus Road, London
Attendance: 15,568[1]
Referee: Glen Black  


GREAT BRITAIN
1. Paul Wellens · 2. Brian Carney · 3. Martin Gleeson · 4. Keith Senior · 5. Leon Pryce · 6. Kevin Sinfield · 7. Paul Deacon · 8. Stuart Fielden · 9. Keiron Cunningham · 10. Jamie Peacock (c) · 11. Lee Gilmour · 12. Paul Johnson · 13. Gareth Ellis
Interchange: 14. Rob Burrow · 15. Adrian Morley · 16. Chev Walker · 17. Nick Fozzard
Coach: Brian Noble

NEW ZEALAND
1. Brent Webb · 2. Jake Webster · 3. Paul Whatuira · 4. Clinton Toopi · 5. Manu Vatuvei · 6. Nigel Vagana · 7. Stacey Jones · 8. Paul Rauhihi · 9. Motu Tony · 10. Ruben Wiki (c) · 11. David Kidwell · 12. David Solomona · 13. Awen Guttenbeil
Interchange: 14. Louis Anderson · 15. Roy Asotasi · 16. Frank Pritchard · 17. Ali Lauiti'iti
Coach: Brian McClennan


2005-11-05
Great Britain   6 – 20   Australia
Tries:
Adrian Morley
Goals:
Kevin Sinfield (1/1)
Report Tries:
Matt Cooper (2)
Anthony Minichiello
Goals:
Craig Fitzgibbon (4/5)
JJB Stadium, Wigan
Attendance: 25,004[1]
Referee: Tim Mander  


GREAT BRITAIN
1. Paul Wellens · 2. Brian Carney · 3. Martin Gleeson · 4. Keith Senior · 5. Leon Pryce · 6. Iestyn Harris · 7. Paul Deacon · 8. Stuart Fielden · 9. Keiron Cunningham · 10. Adrian Morley · 11. Jamie Peacock (c) · 12. Paul Johnson · 13. Kevin Sinfield
Interchange: 14. Lee Gilmour · 15. Chev Walker · 16. Jamie Thackray · 17. Mickey Higham
Coach: Brian Noble

AUSTRALIA
1. Anthony Minichiello · 2. Matt King · 3. Mark Gasnier · 4. Matt Cooper · 5. Brent Tate · 6. Darren Lockyer (c) · 7. Scott Prince · 8. Petero Civoniceva · 9. Danny Buderus · 10. Steve Price · 11. Luke O'Donnell · 12. Craig Fitzgibbon · 13. Ben Kennedy
Interchange: 14. Trent Barrett · 15. Jason Ryles · 16. Mark O'Meley · 17. Willie Mason
Coach: Wayne Bennett


2005-11-12
Great Britain   38 – 12   New Zealand
Tries:
Brian Carney (2)
Stuart Fielden
Paul Deacon
Chev Walker
Keith Senior
Goals:
Paul Deacon (2/2)
Iestyn Harris (5/5)
Report Tries:
Jake Webster (2)
Ali Lauiti'iti
Goals:
Stacey Jones (0/3)
Galpharm Stadium, Huddersfield
Attendance: 19,232[1]
Referee: Tim Mander  


GREAT BRITAIN
1. Paul Wellens · 2. Brian Carney · 3. Martin Gleeson · 4. Keith Senior · 5. Leon Pryce · 6. Iestyn Harris · 7. Paul Deacon · 8. Stuart Fielden · 9. Keiron Cunningham · 10. Adrian Morley · 11. Jamie Peacock (c) · 12. Paul Johnson · 13. Gareth Ellis
Interchange: 14. Mickey Higham · 15. Chev Walker · 16. Jamie Thackray · 17. Richard Horne
Coach: Brian Noble

NEW ZEALAND
1. Brent Webb · 2. Jake Webster · 3. Shontayne Hape · 4. Clinton Toopi · 5. Manu Vatuvei · 6. Nigel Vagana · 7. Stacey Jones · 8. Paul Rauhihi · 9. Motu Tony · 10. Ruben Wiki (c) · 11. David Kidwell · 12. David Solomona · 13. Awen Guttenbeil
Interchange: 14. David Faiumu · 15. Roy Asotasi · 16. Louis Anderson · 17. Ali Lauiti'iti
Coach: Brian McClennan


  • Australia were without their captain Darren Lockyer for this match and the remainder of the tournament after he injured his foot at training.[2]
2005-11-19
Great Britain   14 – 26   Australia
Tries:
Brian Carney
Richard Horne
Goals:
Iestyn Harris (3/4)
Report Tries:
Matt Cooper
Mark O'Meley
Brent Tate
Mark Gasnier
Goals:
Craig Fitzgibbon (5/5)
Craig Gower (0/1)
KC Stadium, Hull
Attendance: 25,150[1]
Referee: Steve Ganson  


GREAT BRITAIN
1. Leon Pryce · 2. Brian Carney · 3. Martin Gleeson · 4. Keith Senior · 5. Gareth Raynor · 6. Iestyn Harris · 7. Richard Horne · 8. Stuart Fielden · 9. Keiron Cunningham · 10. Adrian Morley · 11. Jamie Peacock (c) · 12. Paul Johnson · 13. Gareth Ellis
Interchange: 14. Mickey Higham · 15. Chev Walker · 16. Jamie Thackray · 17. Kevin Sinfield
Coach: Brian Noble

AUSTRALIA
1. Anthony Minichiello · 2. Matt King · 3. Mark Gasnier · 4. Matt Cooper · 5. Brent Tate · 6. Trent Barrett · 7. Craig Gower · 8. Petero Civoniceva · 9. Danny Buderus (c) · 10. Jason Ryles · 11. Luke O'Donnell · 12. Craig Fitzgibbon · 13. Ben Kennedy
Interchange: 14. Craig Wing · 15. Willie Mason · 16. Mark O'Meley · 17. Trent Waterhouse
Coach: Wayne Bennett

Tournament standingsEdit

Team Played Won Drew Lost For Against Difference Points
  Australia 4 3 0 1 102 84 +18 6
  New Zealand 4 2 0 2 118 120 −2 4
  Great Britain 4 1 0 3 84 100 −16 2

FinalEdit

Saturday, 26 November
New Zealand   24 – 0   Australia
Tries:
Paul Whatuira
Manu Vatuvei (2)
Brent Webb

Goals: Stacey Jones (4/7)

Elland Road, Leeds[3]
Attendance: 26,534[1]
Referee: Steve Ganson  
Man of the Match: Ruben Wiki  [4]
Australia Position New Zealand
Anthony Minichiello FB Brent Webb
Matt King WG Jake Webster
Mark Gasnier CE Paul Whatuira
Matt Cooper CE Clinton Toopi
Brent Tate WG Manu Vatuvei
Trent Barrett FE Nigel Vagana
Craig Gower HB Stacey Jones
Petero Civoniceva PR Paul Rauhihi
Danny Buderus (c) HK Motu Tony
Jason Ryles PR Ruben Wiki (c)
Luke O'Donnell SR David Kidwell
Craig Fitzgibbon SR Louis Anderson
Ben Kennedy LK Shontayne Hape
Craig Wing Int David Faiumu
Willie Mason Int Roy Asotasi
Mark O'Meley Int David Solomona
Steve Price Int Ali Lauiti'iti
Wayne Bennett Coach Brian McClennan

The historic win by the Kiwis over an Australian 17 containing only 3 Queensland players and one player from the previous month's 2005 NRL grand final put an end to the Kangaroos' dominance in international rugby league. It was the first time Australia, hot favourites for the match, had failed to win a series or tournament since France defeated them in both Tests of the 1978 Kangaroo tour.[5]

The win by New Zealand was the first time the Kiwis had beaten Australia in a test series or tournament (not including one-off test wins in 1971, 1987 and 1998) since 1952. Australian coach Wayne Bennett resigned from the national coaching post just over a week after the final.[6]

Player statisticsEdit

Non-series testsEdit

During the series, Australia and New Zealand played additional Tests against France. This was the first time the two teams had met in a test match since Australia's 74-0 win in Béziers in the last game of the 1994 Kangaroo tour.

Australia: 1 Anthony Minichiello, 2 Eric Grothe, Jr., 3 Mark Gasnier, 4 Matt Cooper, 5 Brent Tate, 6 Scott Prince, 7 Craig Gower (c), 8 Jason Ryles, 9 Craig Wing, 10 Mark O'Meley, 11 Ben Creagh, 12 Willie Mason, 13 Trent Waterhouse
Interchange: 14 Steve Price, 15 Petero Civoniceva, 16 Andrew Ryan, 17 Matt King

France: 1 Renaud Guigue, 2 Frédéric Zitter, 3 Christophe Moly, 4 Jérôme Hermet, 5 Olivier Charles, 6 Laurent Frayssinous, 7 Julien Rinaldi, 8 David Ferriol, 9 David Berthezène, 10 Jérôme Guisset, 11 Aurélien Cologni, 12 Jamal Fakir, 13 Grégory Mounis
Interchange: 14 Maxime Grésèque, 15 Adel Fellous, 16 Jean Christophe Borlin, 17. Sébastien Raguin

11 November 2005
France   12 – 44   Australia
Stade Aimé Giral, Perpignan
Attendance: 7,913
Referee: Ashley Klein  

For this match, Craig Gower was given the honour of captaining Australia for the first time.[7]

Australia 44 (A Minichiello 2, T Waterhouse 2, M Cooper, S Prince, C Gower, W Mason tries; S Prince 6 goals) defeated France 12 (L Frayssinous, M Gresqueu tries; L Frayssinous 2 goals)


18 November 2005
France   22 – 38   New Zealand
Stadium Municipal, Toulouse
Attendance: 12,500
Referee: Karl Kirkpatrick  

Other gameEdit

New Zealand played a midweek match against England "A" which did not count as a test match. Halftime was 12-all.

7 November 2005
England A   22 – 30   New Zealand

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Tri-Nations 2005". Rugby League Project. Retrieved 5 December 2008.
  2. ^ Hadfield, Dave (8 November 2005). "Australia's optimism dented by Lockyer fall". The Independent. Archived from the original on 21 September 2013. Retrieved 19 November 2011.
  3. ^ "Final: Kiwis v Australia". 2005 Gillette Tri Nations. nzrl.co.nz. Archived from the original on 14 September 2012. Retrieved 19 November 2011.
  4. ^ Richards, Huw (27 November 2005). "New Zealand dismantles Australia's dynasty, 24-0". The New York Times. USA. Retrieved 6 March 2011.
  5. ^ AFP (27 November 2005). "Kiwis crush Kangaroos in Tri-Nations final". ABC News. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  6. ^ Williams, Daniel (12 December 2005). "Keep It Simple, Sport". Time. Time Inc. Retrieved 15 January 2010.
  7. ^ Annual Report 2005 Archived 5 July 2009 at the Wayback MachineAustralian Rugby League

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit