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1978 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France

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The 1978 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France comprised the Australia national rugby league team's fourteenth tour of Great Britain and ninth tour of France, and took place from September to December 1978. Coached by Frank Stanton and captained by Bob Fulton, the Australian team, also known as the Kangaroos, played a match against Wales before contesting the Ashes series against Great Britain, winning the third and deciding Test match.[1] The tourists then moved on to France where they were narrowly beaten in both Tests, the last series the Kangaroos would lose until 2005.[2] In addition to these six internationals, the Australians played sixteen other matches against local club and representative sides in both countries. The 1978 Kangaroo tour followed the tour of 1973 while the next tour would be staged in 1982.

Contents

BackgroundEdit

The 1978 Kangaroo tour was the first since 1973 and took place in the wake of Australia's rugby league season. Sydney's 1978 NSWRFL season, which contributed the vast majority of the tourists, ended later in the year than usual as it involved a grand final replay. For the English the tour was conducted during the first half of the 1978–79 Northern Rugby Football League season.

Touring squadEdit

The Australian team's coach was Frank Stanton, who had already taken the City, New South Wales and the Manly-Warringah teams to victory in all of their respective competitions that year.[3] Eastern Suburbs's captain (and former Manly premiership captain under Stanton in 1976), Bob Fulton, was selected to be the touring Australian side's skipper while Cronulla back rower Greg Pierce was named as vice-captain.[4] Manly-Warringah Grand Final winner John Harvey created some controversy when he declined selection for the tour due to personal reasons.[5] As a result, his Manly-Warringah teammate Bruce Walker was called in as a replacement.[6] Another Manly premiership winner Terry Randall, who had required pain killing injections just to take the field in Manly's tough finals campaign which saw them play 6 games in 24 games[clarification needed] (2 of them, including the Grand Final against Cronulla, were replays played only 3 days after drawn games), also declined to tour citing exhaustion, though he later admitted regret in not touring. One shock omission was Manly centre Russel Gartner who had played two games for Australia in the 1977 World Cup including the Final in which he scored a spectacular 65 metre solo try. Gartner, a speedy outside back who could play either centre or wing, had scored two tries in the Grand Final replay, one a 70-metre effort where he easily outpaced the Cronulla defence despite having torn his hamstring a week earlier, was considered unlucky not to tour.

Of the 28 man squad, only three Queensland based players were chosen - Souths Innisfail winger Kerry Boustead, Brisbane Easts prop forward Rod Morris and Redcliffe halfback Greg Oliphant. The only other Queenslanders in the squad were St George back rower Rod Reddy and Manly forward Bruce Walker.

The tour manager was Canterbury-Bankstown Chief Executive Peter "Bullfrog" Moore, with Jim Caldwell as the co-manager.[7]

Craig Young was named 'player of the tour'.[8] Bob Fulton was the tourists' top try scorer with 9.[9] Michael Cronin was the tourists' top point scorer with 142.

Player Club Position(s) Tests Matches Tries Goals F/Goals Points
  Chris Anderson   Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs Wing 5
  Kerry Boustead   Innisfail Souths (Qld) Wing 5
  Les Boyd   Western Suburbs Magpies Second-row, Prop 3
  Larry Corowa   Balmain Tigers Wing 0
  Michael Cronin   Parramatta Eels Centre 5 142
  Graham Eadie   Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles Fullback 5
  Bob Fulton (c)   Eastern Suburbs Roosters Five-eighth, Centre 5 9
  Geoff Gerard   Parramatta Eels Prop, Second-row 5
  Johnny Gibbs   Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles Halfback 0
  Ron Hilditch   Parramatta Eels Hooker, Prop 1
  Steve Kneen   Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks Second-row, Lock 0
  Max Krilich   Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles Hooker 2
  Steve Martin   Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles Halfback 1
  Allan McMahon   Balmain Tigers Fullback, Wing, Centre 0
  Rod Morris   Eastern Suburbs Tigers (Qld) Prop 2
  Greg Oliphant   Redcliffe Dolphins (Qld) Halfback 0
  Graeme Olling   Parramatta Eels Prop 3
  George Peponis   Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs Hooker 2
  Greg Pierce (vc)   Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks Lock, Second-row 0
  Ray Price   Parramatta Eels Lock 5
  Tommy Raudonikis   Western Suburbs Magpies Halfback 5
  Rod Reddy   St George Dragons Second-row, Lock 3
  Steve Rogers   Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks Centre 4
  Ian Schubert   Eastern Suburbs Roosters Fullback, Wing 0
  Alan Thompson   Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles Five-eighth 3
  Ian Thomson   Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles Prop 2
  Bruce Walker   Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles Prop, Second-row 0
  Craig Young   St George Dragons Prop 5

Great Britain legEdit

Test VenuesEdit

The three Ashes series tests took place at the following venues.

Wigan Bradford Leeds
Central Park Odsal Headingley
Capacity: 35,000 Capacity: 40,000 Capacity: 30,000
     




A controversial late Alan Gwilliam try gave Warrington a 15–12 win over Australia, with Steve Hesford kicking six goals. In the tourists' first lost match of the tour Warrington's packmen Tommy Martyn, Mike Nicholas, Tommy Cunningham and Roy Lester were in superb form, ably supported by replacement half backs Gwilliam and Clark. This was Warrington's eighth win over Australia since .[15]


WalesEdit

The Kangaroos played a non-test international against Wales at the St. Helen's Ground. As of 2017 this was the 13th and final rugby league international played at the ground.

Sunday, 15 October
Wales   3 – 8   Australia
Tries:


Goals:
David Watkins (1)
Field Goals::
David Watkins
[16] Tries:
Bob Fulton
Tommy Raudonikis
Goals:
Michael Cronin (1)
St Helen's Ground, Swansea
Attendance: 4,250
Referee: Ron Campbell
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Wales
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Australia
FB 1   David Watkins (c)
RW 2   Clive Sullivan
RC 3   David Willicombe
LC 4   Eddie Cunningham
LW 5   John Bevan
SO 6   Bill Francis
SH 7   Paul Woods
PR 8   Jim Mills
HK 9   Tony Fisher
PR 10   Mel James
SR 11   Glyn Shaw
SR 12   Trevor Skerrett
LK 13   Roy Mathias
Substitutions:
IC 14
IC 15
Coach:
  Kel Coslett
 
FB 1   Graham Eadie
LW 2   Ian Schubert
RC 3   Michael Cronin
LC 4   Steve Rogers
RW 5   Kerry Boustead
FE 6   Bob Fulton (c)
HB 7   Tommy Raudonikis
PR 8   Graham Olling
HK 9   George Peponis
PR 10   Ian Thomson
SR 11   Greg Pierce
SR 12   Rod Reddy
LF 13   Ray Price
Substitutions:
IC 14   Craig Young
IC 15   Alan Thompson
Coach:
  Frank Stanton

Kangaroos' vice captain Greg Pierce injured his knee in this match and made no more appearances on the tour.[17]



1st Ashes TestEdit

This year Great Britain had the opportunity to re-gain the Ashes title on home soil. The Ashes series was styled the "Forward Chemicals Test series" due to sponsorship reasons.

Saturday 21 October
Great Britain   9 – 15   Australia
Tries:
John Bevan

Goals::
George Fairbairn (3)
[19] Tries:
Kerry Boustead
Bob Fulton
Goals::
Mick Cronin (4)
Field Goals::
Bob Fulton
Central Park, Wigan
Attendance: 17,644
Referee: Ron Campbell  
Man of the Match: Rod Reddy  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Great Britain
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Australia
FB 1   George Fairbairn
RW 2   Stuart Wright
RC 3   Eric Hughes
LC 4   Eddie Cunningham
LW 5   John Bevan
SO 6   Roger Millward (c)
SH 7   Steve Nash
PR 8   Jimmy Thompson
HK 9   David Ward
PR 10   Paul Rose
SR 11   George Nicholls
SR 12   Len Casey
LK 13   Steve Norton
Substitutions:
IC 14   John Holmes
IC 15   Phil Hogan
Coach:
  Peter Fox
FB 1   Graham Eadie
RW 2   Kerry Boustead
RC 3   Steve Rogers
LC 4   Michael Cronin
LW 5   Chris Anderson
FE 6   Bob Fulton (c)
HB 7   Tommy Raudonikis
PR 8   Graham Olling
HK 9   Max Krilich
PR 10   Craig Young
SR 11   Geoff Gerard
SR 12   Rod Reddy
LF 13   Ray Price
Substitutions:
IC 14   Steve Kneen
IC 15
Coach:
  Frank Stanton

Great Britain were trailing 6-7 with fifteen minutes remaining when an Australian pass went to ground and Welsh winger John Bevan kicked the ball ahead. It was then a foot race between him and Australian fullback Graham Eadie to reach the ball which was slowing within Australia's in-goal area. Both players stumbled and dived, with Bevan getting a hand on the ball and claiming the try which was awarded, giving the home side a 9-7 lead. The Kangaroos then worked their way up to the other end of the field and moved the ball through the hands out to the right wing where Kerry Boustead crossed for a try, regaining his side the lead 9-10. In the final minutes Australian captain Bob Fulton forced his way over for a try which was also converted, so the match ended with the scoreline at 9-15.


Widnes: David Eckersley, Stuart Wright, Malcolm Aspey, Mick George, Mick Burke, Eric Hughes, Reg Bowden, Brian Hogan, Keith Elwell, Jim Mills, Mick Adams, David Hull, Doug Laughton (c). Coach - Doug Laughton

Australia: Allan McMahon, Ian Schubert, Michael Cronin (c), Alan Thompson, Chris Anderson, Steve Martin, Greg Oliphant, Rod Morris, Ron Hilditch, Ian Thomson, Geoff Gerard, Steve Kneen, Ray Price. Res - Bob Fulton, Bruce Walker

Widnes, the reigning British champions, were leading 7–2 half time. Up to and including the last Kangaroo tour in which Australia played English club teams as part of their schedule in 1994, this was the last game the Kangaroos lost to an English club side. This was also the only time in what would be 15 tour games between 1909–1990 that Widnes would defeat The Kangaroos. Their previous best result was a 13–all draw on 21 October 1937 during the 1937–38 tour.




2nd Ashes TestEdit

Several changes were made to the Great Britain team, including a completely new front row. This match was broadcast live.[23]

Sunday 5 November
Great Britain   18 – 14   Australia
Tries:
Stuart Wright (2)

Goals:
George Fairbairn (6)
[24] Tries:
Ray Price
Steve Rogers
Goals:
Steve Rogers (4)
Odsal, Bradford
Attendance: 26,761
Referee: Mick Naughton  
Man of the Match: Brian Lockwood  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Great Britain
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Australia
FB 1   George Fairbairn
RW 2   Stuart Wright
RC 3   John Joyner
LC 4   Les Dyl
LW 5   John Atkinson
SO 6   Roger Millward (c)
SH 7   Steve Nash
PR 8   Jim Mills
HK 9   Tony Fisher
PR 10   Brian Lockwood
SR 11   George Nicholls
SR 12   Phil Lowe
LK 13   Steve Norton
Substitutions:
IC 14   John Holmes
IC 15   Paul Rose
Coach:
  Peter Fox
FB 1   Graham Eadie
RW 2   Kerry Boustead
RC 3   Steve Rogers
LC 4   Michael Cronin
LW 5   Chris Anderson
FE 6   Bob Fulton (c)
HB 7   Tommy Raudonikis
PR 8   Graham Olling
HK 9   Max Krilich
PR 10   Craig Young
SR 11   Geoff Gerard
SR 12   Rod Reddy
LF 13   Ray Price
Substitutions:
IC 14   Alan Thompson
IC 15   Les Boyd
Coach:
  Frank Stanton

In the final minutes of the first half the British had just made their way into Australia's half of the field when they made a break up the middle through Roger Millward. He then kicked the ball ahead as he was being tackled and his winger Stuart Wright was chasing through to get a hand on it and score. The try was converted so the home side led at the break 11 – 4.

In the second half Britain's right centre John Joyner made a break and popped a pass over to his winger Stuart Wright to cross once again. They won the match 18–14 to bring the series to 1-all.

This would be the last time Great Britain beat Australia in a Test match for another ten years.[25]


Wigan: George Fairbairn, Dennis Ramsdale, David Willicombe, Alan Greenall, Jimmy Hornby, Keiron O'Loughlin, Bernard Coyle, John Wood, Tony Karalius, Steve O'Neill, John Foran, Bill Melling, Dennis Boyd. Res - Malcolm Swann, David Regan. Coach - Vince Karalius

Australia: Allan McMahon, Larry Corowa, Steve Rogers, Michael Cronin, Ian Schubert, Alan Thompson, Steve Martin, Ian Thomson, Ron Hilditch, Rod Morris, Geoff Gerard, Les Boyd, Bruce Walker

At half time Wigan trailed Australia 2 – 5.[27]


In a Leeds bar, a member of Surrey rock band The Jam, Paul Weller, glassed the face of Jim Caldwell, the team manager from Queensland.[28] Australian player Larry Corowa ran to defend the bloodied Caldwell, was punched from behind himself and raced into a nearby bar to get teammates to provide reinforcements for the brawl that ensued. One member of The Jam landed in hospital with broken ribs and another was reported at the time to have been charged with assault. The official police statement cleared the Australians of any wrongdoing.[29]


The game against St Helens saw the largest non-test attendance of the tour of 16,532.



3rd Ashes TestEdit

Warrington's John Bevan came into the centres for Leeds star Les Dyl, while Hull F.C. prop Vince Farrar made his Great Britain debut in place of second test Man of the Match, Hull Kingston Rovers' forward Brian Lockwood who was unavailable due to injury. The Kangaroos maintained the same backline from the 2nd Test, but brought George Peponis, Rod Morris and Les Boyd into their forward pack.

Saturday 18 November
15:00
Great Britain   6 – 23   Australia
Tries:
John Bevan
Roger Millward


Goals:
[32] Tries:
Les Boyd
Geoff Gerard
George Peponis
Tom Raudonikis
Goals:
Mick Cronin (5/6)
Field Goals:
Bob Fulton (1)
Headingley, Leeds
Attendance: 30,604
Referee: Mick Naughton  
Man of the Match: Tom Raudonikis  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Great Britain
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Australia
FB 1   George Fairbairn
RW 2   Stuart Wright
RC 3   John Joyner
LC 4   John Bevan
LW 5   John Atkinson
SO 6   Roger Millward (c)
SH 7   Steve Nash
PR 8   Jim Mills
HK 9   Tony Fisher
PR 10   Vince Farrar
SR 11   George Nicholls
SR 12   Phil Lowe
LK 13   Steve Norton
Substitutions:
IC 14   John Holmes
IC 15   Paul Rose
Coach:
  Peter Fox
FB 1   Graham Eadie
RW 2   Kerry Boustead
RC 3   Steve Rogers
LC 4   Michael Cronin
LW 5   Chris Anderson
FE 6   Bob Fulton (c)
HB 7   Tommy Raudonikis
PR 8   Craig Young
HK 9   George Peponis
PR 10   Rod Morris
SR 11   Geoff Gerard
SR 12   Les Boyd
LF 13   Ray Price
Substitutions:
IC 14   Alan Thompson
IC 15   Ian Thomson
Coach:
  Frank Stanton

The deciding test attracted the largest attendance of any match on the tour. After two penalty goals by Mick Cronin Australia led by 4 points to nil. The Kangaroos then got the first try of the match with a close-range dive from George Peponis at dummy-half. The conversion by Cronin was successful so Australia led 9 – 0. The visitors scored another try when the ball was passed from dummy-half to a steamrolling Les Boyd who raced through to score under the goal posts, bringing the lead to 12 – 0. Later, after making a break and crossing the half-way line Raudonikis passed to Geoff Gerard who ran the remaining metres to score untouched, making the score 17 – 0.

Australian fullback Graham Eadie crossed early in the second half but the try was controversially disallowed for a forward pass. Bob Fulton took the Australians' lead out to 20–0 with a drop-goal early in the second half.[33] Great Britain scored the first try of the second half when 31-year-old Roger Millward, captaining Great Britain for the last time,[34] reached out of a tackle and bounced the ball off the turf of the Australian in-goal area. The home side scored again when they moved the ball through the hands out to the left wing where Bevan dived over in the corner. The Kangaroos scored next when Raudonikis, directly from a scrum win, ran through and put the ball down.

Australia therefore retained the Ashes with the first of a fourteen-year winning streak between these two sides that would last until 1988.[35]

France legEdit


1st TestEdit

Steve Martin was selected to make his Test debut.[37]

Sunday 26 November
France   13 – 10   Australia
Tries:
Michel Naudo

Goals:
Jose Moya (5)
[38] Tries:
Michael Cronin
Graham Eadie
Goals:
Michael Cronin (2)
Stade d'Albert Domec, Carcassonne
Attendance: 7,000
Referee: Andre Breysse  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
France
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Australia
FB 1 Francis Tranier
RW 2 Jose Moya
RC 3 Christian Laumond
LC 4 Michel Naudo
LW 5 Philippe Fourcade
SO 6 Eric Waligunda
SH 7 Ivan Grésèque
PR 8 Henri Daniel
HK 9 Andre Malacamp
PR 10 Delphin Castanon
SR 11 Didier Hermet
SR 12 Charles Zalduendo
LK 13 Michel Maique (c)
Substitutions:
IC 14
IC 15
Coach:
  Roger Garrigue
FB 1   Graham Eadie
RW 2   Kerry Boustead
RC 3   Michael Cronin
LC 4   Steve Martin
LW 5   Chris Anderson
FE 6   Bob Fulton (c)
HB 7   Tommy Raudonikis
PR 8   Craig Young
HK 9   George Peponis
PR 10   Rod Morris
SR 11   Geoff Gerard
SR 12   Les Boyd
LF 13   Ray Price
Substitutions:
IC 14
IC 15
Coach:
  Frank Stanton

France won the first Test 13–10 at Stade Albert Domec in Carcassonne.





2nd TestEdit

Sunday 10 December
France   11 – 10   Australia
Tries:
Michel Naudo

Goals:
Jose Moya (3)
Field Goals:
Jean-Marc Bourret (1)
Eric Waligunda (1)
[42] Tries:
Kerry Boustead
Steve Rogers
Goals:
Michael Cronin (2)
Stadium Municipal, Toulouse
Attendance: 6,500
Referee: P Laverny  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
France
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Australia
FB 1 Francis Tranier
RW 2 Jose Moya
RC 3 Christian Laumond
LC 4 Michel Naudo
LW 5 Gerard Borreil
SO 6 Eric Waligunda
SH 7 Jean-Louis Castel
PR 8 Henri Daniel
HK 9 Andre Malacamp
PR 10 Delphin Castanon
SR 11 Didier Hermet
SR 12 Charles Zalduendo
LK 13 Michel Maique (c)
Substitutions:
IC 14 Jean-Marc Bourret
IC 15 Joel Roosebrouck
Coach:
  Roger Garrigue
FB 1   Graham Eadie
RW 2   Kerry Boustead
RC 3   Steve Rogers
LC 4   Michael Cronin
LW 5   Chris Anderson
FE 6   Bob Fulton (c)
HB 7   Tommy Raudonikis
PR 8   Ian Thomson
HK 9   Ron Hilditch
PR 10   Craig Young
SR 11   Geoff Gerard
SR 12   Rod Reddy
LF 13   Ray Price
Substitutions:
IC 14   Graham Olling
IC 15   Alan Thompson
Coach:
  Frank Stanton

The referee was Mr Laverny from Bordeaux. France were coached by Roger Garrigue. Their line-up included world class players, lock, Joel Roosebrouck[43] and prop, Didier Hermet from Villeneuve-Sur-Lot, and Jean Marc Bourret in the centres. Ron Hilditch played at hooker in place of Max Krilich who was injured.[44] France claimed a 2–0 series win over the touring Kangaroos with an 11–10 result at the Stade Municipal, Toulouse in front of 6,500 spectators.

France thus became the last team to record successive victories against Australia in a single series.[45] This would be the last time the Kangaroos failed to win a series or tournament until the 2005 Tri-Nations.[46]

StatisticsEdit

Leading Try Scorer

Leading Point Scorer

Largest Attendance

Largest Club Game Attendance

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ news.bbc.co.uk. "Australia v Great Britain: the history". BBC Sport. BBC. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  2. ^ AFP (27 November 2005). "Kiwis crush Kangaroos in Tri-Nations final". ABC News. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  3. ^ "Frank Stanton". Sport Australia Hall of Fame. sahof.org.au. Retrieved 8 February 2014.
  4. ^ Annual Report (PDF). Australia: Australian Rugby Football League. 2008. p. 57.
  5. ^ Tony Adams. "Legend Q&A". Rugby League Week. Sydney, NSW: PBLMedia (4 July 2007): 22–23.
  6. ^ "Bruce Walker". yesterdayshero.com.au. SmartPack International. Archived from the original on 31 August 2012. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  7. ^ Clarkson, Alan (14 November 1978). "Kangaroos Brawl with Punk Group". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  8. ^ "Craig Young". Legends. jubileeavenue.com.au. Retrieved 8 February 2014.
  9. ^ Whiticker, Alan. "Bob Fulton". rugbyleagueproject.org. Shawn Dollin, Andrew Ferguson and Bill Bates. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  10. ^ Blackpool vs Australia
  11. ^ Cumbria vs Australia
  12. ^ Great Britain U/24 vs Australia
  13. ^ Bradford Northern vs Australia
  14. ^ Warrington vs Australia
  15. ^ "Changing Times – 1970 to 1995". warringtonwolves.org. Warrington Wolves. Archived from the original on 9 March 2012. Retrieved 8 February 2014.
  16. ^ Wales vs Australia
  17. ^ Whiticker, Alan. "Greg Pierce". rugbyleagueproject.org. Shawn Dollin, Andrew Ferguson and Bill Bates. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  18. ^ "Leeds vs Australia". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 8 February 2014.
  19. ^ 1st Ashes Test
  20. ^ "Widnes vs Australia". Archived from the original on 9 February 2014. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  21. ^ "Hull F.C. vs Australia". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  22. ^ "Salford vs Australia". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  23. ^ "Kangaroos will play in London on 1982 tour". The Sydney Morning Herald. 12 November 1981. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  24. ^ 2nd Ashes Test
  25. ^ "Ashes battles of the past". news.bbc.co.uk. BBC Sport. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  26. ^ "Wigan vs Australia". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  27. ^ "8th November 1978: Wigan 2 Australia 28". Cherry & White. wigan.rlfans.com. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  28. ^ Malone, Paul (13 November 2013). "Recent Billy Slater and Josh Papalii incidents far from the tip of the iceberg for Kangaroos". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 8 February 2014.
  29. ^ Walshaw, Nick (19 October 2013). "Josh Papalii robbing just the latest in long list of tour mishaps for Kangaroos in UK". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 8 February 2014.
  30. ^ "St Helens vs Australia". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  31. ^ "York vs Australia". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  32. ^ 3rd Ashes Test
  33. ^ de la Riviere, Richard (18 November 1978). "On this day". totalrl.com. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  34. ^ "Should he stay or should he go?". The Guardian. 13 January 2004. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  35. ^ Baker, Andrew (20 August 1995). "100 years of rugby league: From the great divide to the Super era". The Independent. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  36. ^ "Catalan XIII vs Australia". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  37. ^ wagga.nsw.gov.au. "Steve Martin". Sporting Hall of Fame. Museum of the Riverina. Retrieved 8 February 2014.
  38. ^ 1st Test - France vs Australia
  39. ^ "Cote d'Azur vs Australia". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  40. ^ "Les Espoirs vs Australia". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  41. ^ "Midi-Pyrénées vs Australia". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  42. ^ 2nd Test - France vs Australia
  43. ^ "FLASHBACK: December 1978". stevericketts.com.au. Steve Ricketts. Retrieved 8 February 2014.
  44. ^ Whiticker, Alan. "Ron Hilditch". rugbyleagueproject.org. Shawn Dollin, Andrew Ferguson and Bill Bates. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  45. ^ Koch, Dan (17 November 2006). "Britain to face Roos backlash". The Australian. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  46. ^ "On this day". ESPN. 10 December 1978. Retrieved 9 February 2014.