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2004 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 2004 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan during the 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team's head football coach was Lloyd Carr. The Wolverines played their home games at Michigan Stadium. The team finished the season with an overall record 9–3 and a mark of 7–1 in Big Ten Conference play, winning of won its second consecutive conference title. Michigan concluded to the season with a loss to Texas in the Rose Bowl.[1]

2004 Michigan Wolverines football
Michigan Wolverines Logo.svg
Big Ten co-champion
Rose Bowl, L 37–38 vs. Texas
ConferenceBig Ten Conference
Ranking
CoachesNo. 12
APNo. 14
2004 record9–3 (7–1 Big Ten)
Head coachLloyd Carr (10th season)
Offensive coordinatorTerry Malone (3rd season)
Offensive schemeMultiple
Defensive coordinatorJim Herrmann (8th season)
Base defenseMultiple
MVPBraylon Edwards
CaptainDavid Baas
CaptainMarlin Jackson
Home stadiumMichigan Stadium
(Capacity: 107,501)
Seasons
← 2003
2005 →
2004 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
No. 8 Iowa +   7 1         10 2  
No. 14 Michigan $+   7 1         9 3  
No. 17 Wisconsin   6 2         9 3  
Northwestern   5 3         6 6  
No. 20 Ohio State   4 4         8 4  
Purdue   4 4         7 5  
Michigan State   4 4         5 7  
Minnesota   3 5         7 5  
Penn State   2 6         4 7  
Illinois   1 7         3 8  
Indiana   1 7         3 8  
  • $ – BCS representative as conference champion
  • + – Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll

Contents

ScheduleEdit

DateTimeOpponentRankSiteTVResultAttendance
September 412:00 p.m.Miami (OH)*No. 8/7ABCW 43–10110,815
September 113:30 p.m.at Notre Dame*No. 8/7NBCL 20–2880,795
September 1812:00 p.m.San Diego State*No. 17/17
  • Michigan Stadium
  • Ann Arbor, MI
ESPNW 24–21109,432
September 253:30 p.m.IowaNo. 19/18
  • Michigan Stadium
  • Ann Arbor, MI
ABCW 30–17111,428
October 23:30 p.m.at IndianaNo. 19/18ABCW 35–1435,001
October 912:00 p.m.No. 13/13 Minnesota No. 14/14
ESPNW 27–24111,518
October 1612:00 p.m.at IllinoisNo. 14/13ABCW 30–1955,725
October 233:30 p.m.at No. 12/12 PurdueNo. 13/11ABCW 16–1465,170
October 303:30 p.m.Michigan StateNo. 12/11
ABCW 45–37 3OT111,609
November 1312:10 p.m.NorthwesternNo. 9/9
  • Michigan Stadium
  • Ann Arbor, MI
ABCW 42–20111,347
November 201:00 p.m.at Ohio StateNo. 7/7ABCL 21–37105,456
January 1, 20055:00 p.m.vs. No. 6/5 Texas*No. 13/12ABCL 37–3893,468

Game summariesEdit

Miami (OH)Edit

Miami (OH) at #8/#7 Michigan
1 234Total
Miami (OH) 0 037 10
Michigan 0 101419 43

Notre DameEdit

San Diego StateEdit

IowaEdit

IndianaEdit

#19/18 Michigan at Indiana
1 234Total
Michigan 7 7210 35
Indiana 0 707 14

MinnesotaEdit

#13 Minnesota at #14 Michigan
Little Brown Jug
1 234Total
Minnesota 7 773 24
Michigan 10 7010 27

IllinoisEdit

PurdueEdit

Michigan StateEdit

NorthwesternEdit

1 234Total
Northwestern 3 377 20
• Michigan 0 72114 42

[2]

Ohio StateEdit

Rose BowlEdit

Statistical achievementsEdit

Braylon Edwards surpassed Anthony Carter's 22-year-old career conference record of 37 touchdown receptions by totaling 39, which continues to be the conference record.[3] He tied the NCAA record with three 1000-receiving yard seasons.[4]

Mike Hart was the Big Ten rushing individual statistical champion (151.8 yards per conference games and 121.2 yards per game).[5] Braylon Edwards was the Big Ten receiving statistical champion for all games with 8.1 receptions per contest, but Purdue's Taylor Stubblefield won the title for conference games. Edwards swept the yardage titles with 110.8 per game and 108.9 per conference game.[6]

Hart set the current school record for single-season 200-yard games (3), surpassing five predecessors with 2 each.[7] Braylon Edwards set numerous school records: single-season receptions (97), surpassing Marquise Walker's 86 from 2001; single-season receiving yards (1330), surpassing Walker's 1143; career receptions (252), surpassing Walker's 176; career yards (3541) surpassing Anthony Carter's 3076 set in 1982; career touchdown receptions (39), surpassing Carter's 37; consecutive games with a reception (38), surpassing Walker's 32; consecutive 100-yard reception games (4 tying his own record from the prior year), surpassing Desmond Howard, Carter and Marcus Knight who all had 3 in various seasons. Only consecutive 100-yard games has been surpassed (by Mario Manningham in 2007).[8] Chad Henne tied Elvis Grbac's 1991 single-season record of 25 touchdown passes.[9]

Starting lineup offenseEdit

Awards and honorsEdit

The individuals in the sections below earned recognition for meritorious performances.[10][11]

NationalEdit

ConferenceEdit

TeamEdit

Coaching staffEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2010. p. 69. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 8, 2010.
  2. ^ Michigan Official Athletic Site – Football. Retrieved 2015-Apr-27.
  3. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2010. p. 39. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 8, 2010.
  4. ^ "2009 Division I Football Records Book: Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 18. Retrieved July 9, 2010.
  5. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2010. pp. 51–2. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 8, 2010.
  6. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2010. p. 53. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 8, 2010.
  7. ^ "Record Book" (PDF). CBS Interactive. January 5, 2010. p. 115. Retrieved July 8, 2010.
  8. ^ "Record Book" (PDF). CBS Interactive. January 5, 2010. pp. 124–125. Retrieved July 8, 2010.
  9. ^ "Record Book" (PDF). CBS Interactive. January 5, 2010. pp. 120–123. Retrieved July 8, 2010.
  10. ^ "2004 Football Team". The Regents of the University of Michigan. April 9, 2007. Retrieved July 8, 2010.
  11. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2010. pp. 70–82. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 8, 2010.
  12. ^ "Michigan's Academic All-Americans". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on July 18, 2010. Retrieved July 8, 2010.

External linksEdit