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The 9th IAAF World Indoor Championships in Athletics were held in the National Indoor Arena in Birmingham, UK from 14 to 16 March 2003. It was the first time the Championships had been held in the UK. There were a total number of 589 participating athletes from 133 countries.[1]

9th IAAF World Indoor Championships
Birmingham 2003 logo.jpg
Host cityBirmingham, United Kingdom
Date(s)14 – 16 March
Main stadiumNational Indoor Arena
Participation583 athletes from
131 nations
Events28

Contents

ResultsEdit

MenEdit

1999 | 2001 | 2003 | 2004 | 2006

Event Gold Silver Bronze
60 m
details
Justin Gatlin
  United States
6.46 Kim Collins
  Saint Kitts and Nevis
6.53 Jason Gardener
  Great Britain
6.55
200 m
details
Marlon Devonish
  Great Britain
20.62 Joseph Batangdon
  Cameroon
20.76 Dominic Demeritte
  Bahamas
20.92
400 m
details
Tyree Washington
  United States
45.34 Daniel Caines
  Great Britain
45.43 Paul McKee
  Ireland
45.99
Jamie Baulch
  Great Britain
800 m
details
David Krummenacker
  United States
1:45.69 Wilson Kipketer
  Denmark
1:45.87 Wilfred Bungei
  Kenya
1:46.54
1,500 m
details
Driss Maazouzi
  France
3:42.59 Bernard Lagat
  Kenya
3:42.62 Abdelkader Hachlaf
  Morocco
3:42.71
3,000 m
details
Haile Gebreselassie
  Ethiopia
7:40.97 Alberto Garcia
  Spain
7:42.08 Luke Kipkosgei
  Kenya
7:42.56
60 m hurdles
details
Allen Johnson
  United States
7.47 Anier Garcia
  Cuba
7.49 Liu Xiang
  China
7.52
4 × 400 m relay
details
  Jamaica (JAM)
Leroy Colquhoun
Danny McFarlane
Michael Blackwood
Davian Clarke
3:04.211
(NR)
  Great Britain (GBR)
Jamie Baulch
Timothy Benjamin
Cori Henry
Daniel Caines
3:06.12   Poland (POL)
Rafał Wieruszewski
Grzegorz Zajączkowski
Marcin Marciniszyn
Marek Plawgo
3:06.61
High jump
details
Stefan Holm
  Sweden
2.35 Yaroslav Rybakov
  Russia
2.33 Gennadiy Moroz
  Belarus
2.30
Pole vault
details
Tim Lobinger
  Germany
5.80 Michael Stolle
  Germany
5.75 Rens Blom
  Netherlands
5.75
(NR)
Long jump
details
Dwight Phillips
  United States
8.29 Yago Lamela
  Spain
8.28 Miguel Pate
  United States
8.21
Triple jump
details
Christian Olsson
  Sweden
17.70 Walter Davis
  United States
17.35 Yoelbi Quesada
  Cuba
17.27
Shot put
details
Manuel Martínez
  Spain
21.24 John Godina
  United States
21.23 Yuriy Bilonog
  Ukraine
21.13
Heptathlon
details
Tom Pappas
  United States
6361 Lev Lobodin
  Russia
6297 Roman Šebrle
  Czech Republic
6196

1 The United States (James Davis, Jerome Young, Milton Campbell, Tyree Washington) originally won the gold medal in 3:04.09, but were disqualified after Young tested positive for drugs in 2004.[2]

WomenEdit

1999 | 2001 | 2003 | 2004 | 2006

Event Gold Silver Bronze
60 m
details
Angela Williams
  United States 1
7.16 Torri Edwards
  United States
7.17 Merlene Ottey
  Slovenia
7.20
200 m
details
Muriel Hurtis
  France 2
22.54 Anastasiya Kapachinskaya
  Russia
22.80 Juliet Campbell
  Jamaica
22.81
400 m
details
Natalya Nazarova
  Russia
50.83 Christine Amertil
  Bahamas
51.11 Grit Breuer
  Germany
51.13
800 m
details
Maria Mutola
  Mozambique
1:58.94 Stephanie Graf
  Austria
1:59.39 Mayte Martínez
  Spain
1:59.53
1,500 m
details
Regina Jacobs
  United States
4:01.76 Kelly Holmes
  Great Britain
4:02.66 Yekaterina Rozenberg
  Russia
4:02.80
3,000 m
details
Berhane Adere
  Ethiopia
8:40.25 Marta Domínguez
  Spain
8:42.12 Meseret Defar
  Ethiopia
8:42.58
60 m hurdles
details
Gail Devers
  United States
7.81 Glory Alozie
  Spain
7.90 Melissa Morrison
  United States
7.92
4 × 400 m relay
details
  Russia (RUS)
Natalya Antyukh
Yuliya Pechonkina
Olesya Zykina
Natalya Nazarova
3:28.45   Jamaica (JAM)
Ronetta Smith
Catherine Scott
Sheryl Morgan
Sandie Richards
3:31.23   United States (USA)
Monique Hennagan
Meghan Addy
Brenda Taylor
Mary Danner
3:31.69
High jump
details
Kajsa Bergqvist
  Sweden
2.01 Yelena Yelesina
  Russia
1.99 Anna Chicherova
  Russia
1.99
Pole vault
details
Svetlana Feofanova
  Russia
4.80
(WR)
Yelena Isinbayeva
  Russia
4.60 Monika Pyrek
  Poland
4.45
Long jump
details
Tatyana Kotova
  Russia
6.84 Inessa Kravets
  Ukraine
6.72 Maurren Maggi
  Brazil
6.70
Triple jump
details
Ashia Hansen
  Great Britain
15.01 Françoise Mbango Etone
  Cameroon
14.88
(NR)
Kéné Ndoye
  Senegal
14.72
Shot put
details
Irina Korzhanenko
  Russia
20.55 Nadzeya Astapchuk
  Belarus
20.31 Astrid Kumbernuss
  Germany
19.86
Pentathlon
details
Carolina Klüft
  Sweden
4933 Natalya Sazanovich
  Belarus
4715 Marie Collonvillé
  France
4644

1 Zhanna Block of Ukraine originally won the 60 m in 7.04, but was disqualified in 2011 for doping offences.[3][4]
2 Michelle Collins of the USA originally won the 200 m in 22.18, but was disqualified in 2005 due to the BALCO scandal.

Medal table by countryEdit

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  United States (USA)83415
2  Russia (RUS)55212
3  Sweden (SWE)4004
4  Great Britain (GBR)2327
5  Ethiopia (ETH)2013
  France (FRA)2013
7  Spain (ESP)1416
8  Germany (GER)1124
9  Jamaica (JAM)1113
  Ukraine (UKR)1113
11  Mozambique (MOZ)1001
12  Belarus (BLR)0213
13  Cameroon (CMR)0202
14  Kenya (KEN)0123
15  Bahamas (BAH)0112
  Cuba (CUB)0112
17  Austria (AUT)0101
  Denmark (DEN)0101
  Saint Kitts and Nevis (SKN)0101
20  Poland (POL)0022
21  Brazil (BRA)0011
  China (CHN)0011
  Czech Republic (CZE)0011
  Ireland (IRL)0011
  Morocco (MAR)0011
  Netherlands (NED)0011
  Senegal (SEN)0011
  Slovenia (SVN)0011
Totals (28 nations)28283086


Participating nationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Record breaking gathering expected in Doha – 150 countries confirm participation. IAAF. Retrieved 4 March 2010.
  2. ^ IAAF: Jerome Young is stripped of 2003 World Championship 400m gold. 24 February 2009
  3. ^ "List of athletes currently serving a period of ineligibility as a result of an anti-doping rule violation under IAAF Rules". IAAF. 2 November 2012. Retrieved 17 November 2012.
  4. ^ IAAF: Viewing IAAF World Indoor Championships > 9th IAAF World Indoor Championships > 60 Metres – women, iaaf.org

External linksEdit