1995 Latvian parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in Latvia on 30 September and 1 October 1995.[1] The Democratic Party "Saimnieks" emerged as the largest party in the Saeima, winning 18 of the 100 seats.

1995 Latvian parliamentary election
Latvia
← 1993 30 September – 1 October 1995 1998 →

All 100 seats in the Saeima
51 seats needed for a majority
Turnout72.65% Decrease (18.53 pp)
Party Leader % Seats +/–
DPS Ziedonis Čevers 15.22 18 New
TKL Joachim Siegerist 14.97 16 New
LC Māris Gailis 14.71 17 -19
TB Guntars Krasts 11.99 14 +8
LVP Alberts Kauls 7.18 8 +8
LZS-LKDS-LDP Jānis Kinna 6.36 8 -10
NKP-ZP Aleksandrs Kiršteins 6.35 6 -9
LSP Filips Stroganovs 5.61 5 New
TSP Jānis Jurkāns 5.58 6 -7
This lists parties that won seats. See the complete results below.
Prime Minister before Prime Minister after
Māris Gailis
Latvian Way
Andris Šķēle
Independent

ResultsEdit

PartyVotes%Seats+/–
Democratic Party "Saimnieks"144,75815.2218New
People's Movement for Latvia142,32414.9716New
Latvian Way139,92914.7117–19
For Fatherland and Freedom114,05011.9914+8
Latvian Unity Party68,3057.188+8
ZSLKDSLDP60,4986.368–10
NKPZP60,3526.358New
Socialist Party of Latvia53,3255.615New
National Harmony Party53,0415.586–7
Labour and Justice Coalition43,5994.580New
Political Union of Economists14,2091.490New
Latvian Farmers' Union13,0091.370–12
Party of Russian Citizens in Latvia11,9241.2500
Popular Front of Latvia11,0901.1700
Political Association of the Underprivileged and Latvian Independence Party9,4681.000New
Citizens Union "Our Land" – Anti-Communist Union5,0500.5300
Democrats' Party2,5460.270New
Latvian Liberal Party2,1630.2300
Latvian National Democratic Party1,3670.140New
Total951,007100.001000
Valid votes951,00798.52
Invalid/blank votes14,3321.48
Total votes965,339100.00
Registered voters/turnout1,328,77972.65
Source: Nohlen & Stöver

AftermathEdit

Both parties of government, Latvian Way and Latvian Farmers' Union were punished by the voters, losing a substantial number of seats. With no party able to form a working majority, a new government was formed led by independent Andris Šķēle.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dieter Nohlen & Philip Stöver (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1122 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7