1987 Argentine legislative election

The Argentine legislative elections of 1987 were held on 6 September. Voters chose their legislators and governors, with a turnout of 83.6%. The ruling Radical Civic Union lost their majority in the Chamber of Deputies.

1987 Argentine legislative election
Argentina
← 1985 6 September 1987 1989 →

127 of 254 seats in the Chamber of Deputies
Turnout84.74%
Party % Seats +/–
Chamber of Deputies
Justicialist Party

41.29% 60 +12
Radical Civic Union

37.24% 52 -14
Union of the Democratic Centre

5.78% 5 +3
Intransigent Party

2.04% 0 -5
Socialist Unity

1.63% 1 +1
Others

12.01% 9 +4
This lists parties that won seats. See the complete results below.
Mapa de las elecciones legislativas de Argentina de 1987.png
Results by province

BackgroundEdit

 
Antonio Cafiero won the election for governor of Buenos Aires Province.

The domestic and international esteem President Raúl Alfonsín earned for advancing the Trial of the Juntas suffered in December 1986, when on his initiative, Congress passed the Full Stop Law, which limited the civil trials against roughly 300 officers implicated in the 1976-79 Dirty War against dissidents to those indicted within 60 days of the law's passage, a tall order given the reluctance of many victims and witnesses to testify. These concessions did not placate hard-liners in the Argentine military who, though in a minority, put Argentina's hard-earned Democracy at risk in April 1987, when a group identified as Carapintadas ("painted faces," from their use of camouflage paint) loyal to Army Major Aldo Rico staged a mutiny of the important Army training base of Campo de Mayo during the Easter weekend. Negotiating in person with the rebels after four days of national suspense, Alfonsín secured their surrender, memorably announcing that "the house is in order."[1]

The goodwill this earned Alfonsín and his centrist Radical Civic Union (UCR) began to erode when in June, Congress passed Alfonsín's Law of Due Obedience, granting immunity to officers implicated in crimes against humanity on the basis of "due obedience." This law, condemned by Amnesty International, among others, effectively halted most remaining prosecutions of Dirty War criminals.[1]

The economy, too, became increasingly challenging. The 1985 Austral Plan had helped lead to a recovery in 1986; but frequent wage freezes ordered by the Economy Minister, Juan Sourrouille, kept real wages from rising, and GDP remained below its 1980 peak, in any case. A sharp fall in global commodity prices had evaporated the nation's US$4 billion trade surplus by 1987, and foreign debt interest payments could only be financed with more public debt, helping lead to a sudden halving of the value of the Argentine austral after May. Inflation (4% a month in May) rose to 14% in August, and though GDP grew modestly, real wages slid by around 8%.[2][3]

Election night, September 6, dealt Alfonsín's UCR its sharpest blow among the nation's governors. The UCR lost 5 of its 7 governors elected in 1983, including the nation's most important: Governor Alejandro Armendáriz of the Province of Buenos Aires (home to 38% of Argentines). Armendáriz had been a key supporter of the President's Project Patagonia, which envisaged the transfer of the nation's capital from Buenos Aires to Viedma for the sake of decentralization. The project, which had been passed by the Lower House of Congress and had even received Pope John Paul II's personal blessing during an April 1987 state visit, had no future without an absolute UCR majority in the Lower House (the Senate - not in play in 1987 - was dominated by the Justicialist Party).[1]

The loss of 13 UCR Congressmen benefited smaller, issue-oriented parties more than it did the Justicialists (whose gains were primarily among the governors, going from 12 to 17). The first to benefit in Congress was the conservative Union of the Democratic Centre (UCeDé), which ran on a free market platform calling for privatizations of an array of State enterprises, responsible for nearly half the nation's goods and services. These companies' losses, led by the Argentine Railways', were blamed by the UCeDé's leader, Alvaro Alsogaray, for the public sector cash flow problem and resulting financial instability (while disregarding the role of foreign debt interest payments). The UCeDé's gain of 4 Congressmen in these elections, though menial, portended the policy of "surgery without anesthetic" adopted by national policy makers in the 1990s.

ResultsEdit

Party Votes % Seats won Total seats
Justicialist Party (PJ) 6,622,252 41.29 60 108
Radical Civic Union (UCR) 5,972,588 37.24 52 118
Union of the Democratic Centre (UCEDE) 926,988 5.78 5 7
Intransigent Party (PI) 327,103 2.04 5
Socialist Unity (US) 261,510 1.63 1 1
Movement for Socialism (MAS) 229,623 1.43
Broad Liberation Front (FRAL) 228,008 1.42
Democratic Progressive Party (PDP) 219,688 1.37 1 2
Autonomist - Liberal - PDP - Popular Liberation Movement 166,746 1.04 2 4
Integration and Development Movement (MID) 155,932 0.97
Democratic Party of Mendoza (PD) 99,749 0.62 1
Provincial Action Front 98,249 0.61 1 1
Retirees Target Party (PBJ) 89,319 0.56
Provincial Defense - White Flag 83,592 0.52 1 1
Salta Renewal Party (PARES) 68,719 0.43 1 2
Neuquén People's Movement (MPN) 61,859 0.39 1 2
Blockist Alliance 59,131 0.37 1 1
Workers' Party (PO) 42,732 0.27
Renewal Front 41,433 0.26
Popular Union (UP) 38,839 0.24
Río Negro Provincial Party (PPR) 38,150 0.24 1 1
Renewal Unit Movement (MUR) 27,611 0.17
Conservative Autonomist Party 24,434 0.15
Labor and People's Party (PTP) 24,270 0.15
Patriotic Liberation Movement 18,784 0.12
Christian Democratic Party (PDC) 15,241 0.10
Democracy and Participation Front 12,854 0.08
Chubut Action Party (PACH) 11,041 0.07
Social Republican Party 10,395 0.06
Patriotic Alliance 10,109 0.06
Alliance Labor Confederation 8,551 0.05
Three Flags Renewal Party 7,691 0.05
Independent Action Alliance 4,387 0.03
Front for Change 4,307 0.03
Federalist Renewal Movement 3,896 0.02
Autonomy and Sovereignty Party 3,729 0.02
Conservative People's Party (PCP) 2,802 0.02
Chaco Alliance 2,707 0.02
Social Justice 1,647 0.01
Popular Alliance 1,608 0.01
Tradition and Coherence 1,491 0.01
Federal Party (PF) 1,405 0.01
Autonomous Party 1,396 0.01
Mobilization 1,345 0.01
Alternative of Change 919 0.01
Christian Socialist Alliance 720 0.00
Liberation Party (PL) 664 0.00
Authentic Socialist Party (PSA) 490 0.00
Popular Line Movement (MOLIPO) 339 0.00
Nationalist Movement 316 0.00
Democratic Party of La Rioja 293 0.00
Total 16,037,652 100 127 254
Positive votes 16,037,652 97.46
Blank votes 326,959 1.99
Invalid votes 77,241 0.47
Tally sheet differences 14,080 0.09
Total votes 16,455,932 100
Registered voters/turnout 19,420,204 84.74
Sources:[4][5]

Results by provinceEdit

Province PJ UCR UCEDE Others
Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats
Buenos Aires 2,706,508 45.08 18 2,254,196 37.55 15 377,074 6.28 2 665,357 11.08
Buenos Aires City 477,617 23.93 3 779,399 39.06 6 362,739 18.18 3 375,878 18.84
Catamarca 66,405 54.09 1 50,664 41.27 1 1,054 0.86 4,639 3.78
Chaco 190,000 49.85 2 174,642 45.82 1 16,486 4.33
Chubut 58,262 44.69 2 48,754 37.40 1 2,366 1.81 20,993 16.10
Córdoba 649,861 43.89 4 692,876 46.80 5 61,784 4.17 76,137 5.14
Corrientes 67,717 18.02 1 93,828 24.97 1 7,550 2.01 206,670 55.00 2
Entre Ríos 264,436 48.45 2 232,748 42.64 2 19,198 3.52 29,441 5.39
Formosa 74,565 50.69 2 71,151 48.37 1 1,389 0.94
Jujuy 82,605 42.53 2 70,393 36.24 1 1,987 1.02 39,259 20.21
La Pampa 73,924 53.63 1 58,286 42.28 1 5,634 4.09
La Rioja 59,292 60.86 2 32,892 33.76 1 491 0.50 4,743 4.87
Mendoza 315,216 46.20 3 243,321 35.66 2 5,037 0.74 118,679 17.40
Misiones 140,497 47.97 2 134,559 45.95 2 8,918 3.05 8,891 3.04
Neuquén 14,863 10.94 39,645 29.18 1 1,703 1.25 79,635 58.62 1
Río Negro 61,674 34.20 1 68,404 37.94 1 3,737 2.07 46,494 25.79 1
Salta 180,984 51.96 2 93,228 26.76 1 74,128 21.28 1
San Juan 112,259 43.57 2 49,450 19.19 19,758 7.67 76,206 29.57 1
San Luis 69,078 51.35 1 44,775 33.29 1 8,546 6.35 12,115 9.01
Santa Cruz 28,136 49.54 1 26,653 46.93 1 2,000 3.52
Santa Fe 640,484 42.21 5 408,370 26.91 3 34,992 2.31 433,643 28.58 2
Santiago del Estero 152,368 50.60 2 128,003 42.51 2 2,048 0.68 18,675 6.20
Tucumán 135,501 26.13 1 176,351 34.01 2 8,006 1.54 198,732 38.32 2
Total 6,622,252 41.29 60 5,972,588 37.24 52 926,988 5.78 5 2,515,824 15.69 10

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Todo Argentina: 1987 (in Spanish)
  2. ^ "INDEC". Archived from the original on 2007-04-06. Retrieved 2009-04-26.
  3. ^ Monografías
  4. ^ "Elecciones Nacionales ESCRUTINIO DEFINITIVO 1987" (PDF). Ministry of the Interior. Archived from the original (PDF) on 28 December 2018.
  5. ^ "Recorriendo las Elecciones de 1983 a 2013". Dirección Nacional Electoral.