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The 1965–66 Bundesliga was the third season of the Bundesliga, West Germany's premier football league. It began on 14 August 1965 and ended on 28 May 1966.[1] Werder Bremen were the defending champions.

Bundesliga
Season1965–66
Champions1860 Munich
1st Bundesliga title
1st German title
RelegatedBorussia Neunkirchen
Tasmania Berlin
European Cup1860 Munich
Cup Winners' CupBorussia Dortmund (title holders)
Bayern Munich
Goals scored987
Average goals/game3.23
Top goalscorerLothar Emmerich (31)
Biggest home winHamburg 8–0 Karlsruhe (12 February 1966)
Biggest away winTasmania Berlin 0–9 Meiderich (26 March 1966)
Highest scoringM'gladbach 8–3 Nürnberg (11 goals) (12 March 1966)

Contents

Competition modusEdit

Every team played two games against each other team, one at home and one away. Teams received two points for a win and one point for a draw. If two or more teams were tied on points, places were determined by goal average. The team with the most points were crowned champions while the two teams with the fewest points were relegated to their respective Regionalliga divisions.

Team changes to 1964–65Edit

Karlsruher SC and FC Schalke 04 would initially have been relegated for finishing in the bottom two places. However, Hertha BSC were found guilty of illegal financial behavior and, as a consequence, had their Bundesliga license revoked. The German FA then decided to keep Karlsruhe and Schalke in the league and expand its size to 18 teams. Bayern Munich and Borussia Mönchengladbach were promoted after having won their respective promotion play-off groups. In order to still have a representative from West Berlin in the league, Tasmania Berlin were also granted promotion.[2]

Season overviewEdit

The 1965–66 season was the inaugural season for the two most successful clubs regarding league titles in Bundesliga history, Borussia Mönchengladbach and Bayern Munich. It was also the first time that a city had two clubs in the Bundesliga. Bayern were a title contender for large parts of the season, but eventually were held short three points by their cross-town rivals 1860, who won their first championship. Nevertheless, the newcomers had something to celebrate as well, as they won the DFB Cup one week after the end of the season, which they finished in third place.

Borussia Dortmund finished in second place, ahead on goal average to Bayern Munich. They also had huge title chances until late in the season, but were beaten 2–0 at home by 1860 on the second-to-last match day. However, Dortmund did not end the season without a title as well, as they beat Liverpool 2–1 after extra time in the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup final at Glasgow's Hampden Park three days earlier. It marked the first time that a German club had won a European championship.

At the other end of the table, another famous German club had a historic season as well – but in the worst way possible. Tasmania Berlin were added to the league just two weeks before the start of the season after city rivals Hertha BSC had been thrown out on financial irregularities. They were not even first choice for a replacement as the Berlin representative, as they had only finished in third place in Oberliga Berlin. But when champions Tennis Borussia were considered too weak after failing in the promotion play-off rounds and therefore were not asked, and runners-up Spandauer SV declined their interest in a Bundesliga spot as well, Tasmania gladly accepted the invitation by the German FA.[3]

The decision turned out to be a fatal one for the club. Tasmania's team was never capable of competing in the Bundesliga. They set up a various number of records, including, among others, lowest point total (8), fewest wins (2), most losses (28), fewest goals scored (15), most goals against (108) and lowest match attendance for a Bundesliga game (827 against Borussia Mönchengladbach on 15 January 1966[4]). Most of the records are still intact.

Team overviewEdit

League tableEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GR Pts Qualification or relegation
1 TSV 1860 München (C) 34 20 10 4 80 40 2.000 50 1966–67 European Cup First round
2 Borussia Dortmund 34 19 9 6 70 36 1.944 47 1966–67 European Cup Winners' Cup Second round[a]
3 FC Bayern Munich 34 20 7 7 71 38 1.868 47 1966–67 European Cup Winners' Cup First round
4 SV Werder Bremen 34 21 3 10 76 40 1.900 45
5 1. FC Köln 34 19 6 9 74 41 1.805 44
6 1. FC Nürnberg 34 14 11 9 54 43 1.256 39 1966–67 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup First round
7 Eintracht Frankfurt 34 16 6 12 64 46 1.391 38
8 Meidericher SV 34 14 8 12 70 48 1.458 36
9 Hamburger SV 34 13 8 13 64 52 1.231 34
10 Eintracht Braunschweig 34 11 12 11 49 49 1.000 34
11 VfB Stuttgart 34 13 6 15 42 48 0.875 32 1966–67 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup First round
12 Hannover 96 34 11 8 15 59 57 1.035 30
13 Borussia Mönchengladbach 34 9 11 14 57 68 0.838 29
14 FC Schalke 04 34 10 7 17 33 55 0.600 27
15 1. FC Kaiserslautern 34 8 10 16 42 65 0.646 26
16 Karlsruher SC 34 9 6 19 35 71 0.493 24
17 Borussia Neunkirchen (R) 34 9 4 21 32 82 0.390 22 Regionalliga
18 Tasmania Berlin (R) 34 2 4 28 15 108 0.139 8
Source: [6]
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal ratio.
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. ^ Borussia Dortmund won the 1965–66 European Cup Winners' Cup and thereby automatically qualified as defending champions.

ResultsEdit

Home \ Away SCT EBS SVW BVB SGE HSV H96 FCK KSC KOE MSV BMG M60 FCB BNE FCN S04 VFB
Tasmania Berlin 0–2 1–1 0–2 0–3 0–4 1–5 1–1 2–0 0–6 0–9 0–0 0–5 0–2 2–1 0–1 1–2 0–2
Eintracht Braunschweig 3–1 1–0 4–0 2–2 1–4 2–1 1–1 2–0 1–2 1–0 1–1 2–2 2–4 1–2 3–0 3–0 1–1
Werder Bremen 5–0 4–0 1–0 3–2 2–0 3–3 4–1 3–1 2–1 2–0 2–0 0–2 1–1 5–2 1–0 2–0 3–1
Borussia Dortmund 3–1 1–1 2–1 3–0 2–2 4–0 4–0 4–1 3–2 1–1 3–1 0–2 3–0 1–0 2–0 7–0 4–0
Eintracht Frankfurt 4–0 4–1 1–0 4–1 2–0 0–1 6–0 1–0 0–0 2–0 3–1 5–2 0–0 1–2 1–2 4–1 3–2
Hamburger SV 5–1 2–1 1–3 1–1 0–1 2–1 4–1 8–0 2–2 2–0 5–0 1–2 0–4 3–0 0–2 1–1 4–1
Hannover 96 5–0 1–1 2–1 1–1 4–1 0–0 4–0 5–2 1–1 0–3 2–1 0–1 3–4 6–0 2–2 0–3 4–2
1. FC Kaiserslautern 0–0 1–1 2–3 0–0 5–2 2–1 1–1 1–0 3–2 1–0 1–2 3–0 1–2 0–0 0–0 3–2 1–2
Karlsruher SC 3–0 1–4 3–2 0–0 4–0 1–4 1–0 1–0 2–1 0–4 3–3 1–1 1–0 1–1 1–2 1–0 3–0
1. FC Köln 4–0 3–0 2–0 1–2 1–0 5–1 0–1 3–2 2–0 1–1 2–2 3–1 6–1 4–2 2–1 2–1 3–1
Meidericher SV 3–0 4–1 1–2 2–1 0–0 3–1 2–2 2–2 8–2 2–3 3–2 2–3 1–1 1–0 1–2 5–1 5–2
Borussia Mönchengladbach 5–0 1–0 0–7 4–5 1–2 0–0 2–0 2–0 1–1 2–3 1–2 1–1 1–2 4–1 8–3 2–0 1–0
1860 Munich 4–0 1–1 3–1 2–1 4–2 1–1 5–0 4–2 2–0 2–1 3–3 3–3 1–0 4–1 1–1 3–0 0–0
Bayern Munich 2–1 2–2 3–1 0–2 2–0 3–0 3–1 3–0 5–1 1–4 3–0 5–2 3–0 6–0 0–0 1–0 0–1
Borussia Neunkirchen 3–1 1–0 1–2 1–3 1–6 1–1 1–0 1–4 1–0 2–1 0–1 1–1 1–9 0–4 2–1 1–0 1–2
1. FC Nürnberg 7–2 1–1 2–1 0–0 0–0 5–0 2–1 1–1 3–0 2–0 4–1 2–2 1–4 2–2 3–1 1–0 1–1
Schalke 04 4–0 1–1 1–6 2–3 3–2 2–1 1–0 2–1 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–2 1–1 2–0 1–0 2–0
VfB Stuttgart 2–0 0–1 0–2 1–1 0–0 1–3 4–2 4–1 1–0 0–1 2–0 5–0 0–0 0–1 2–0 1–0 1–0
Source: DFB
Colours: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.

Top scorersEdit

Champion squadEdit

TSV 1860 München
Goalkeeper: Petar Radenković   (34).

Defenders: Bernd Patzke (28); Hans Reich (26); Manfred Wagner (26); Rudolf Zeiser (12); Rudolf Steiner (9).
Midfielders: Željko Perušić   (34); Peter Grosser (32 / 18); Otto Luttrop (22 / 1); Hans Küppers (19 / 4); Wilfried Kohlars (19).
Forwards: Friedhelm Konietzka (33 / 26); Alfred Heiß (31 / 10); Rudolf Brunnenmeier (27 / 15); Hans Rebele (22 / 5).
(league appearances and goals listed in brackets)

Manager: Max Merkel  .

On the roster but did not play in a league game: Wilfried Tepe; Alfred Kohlhäufl; Ludwig Bründl; Hans Fischer; Helmut Richert; Ernst Winterhalder.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Archive 1965/1966 Schedule". DFB. Archived from the original on 8 June 2011.
  2. ^ Weinrich, Matthias (1998). Enzyklopädie des deutschen Ligafußballs, Band 3: 35 Jahre Bundesliga, Teil 1: 1963–1975 (in German). Kassel: AGON Sportverlag. p. 38. ISBN 3-89784-132-0.
  3. ^ Grüne, Hardy (1999). Von grauen Mäusen und Meistern (in German). Kassel: AGON Sportverlag. p. 32. ISBN 3-89784-114-2.
  4. ^ Weinrich, Matthias (1998). Enzyklopädie des deutschen Ligafußballs, Band 3: 35 Jahre Bundesliga, Teil 1: 1963–1975 (in German). Kassel: AGON Sportverlag. p. 69. ISBN 3-89784-132-0.
  5. ^ a b Grüne, Hardy (2001). Enzyklopädie des deutschen Ligafußballs, Band 7: Vereinslexikon (in German). Kassel: AGON Sportverlag. ISBN 3-89784-147-9.
  6. ^ "TABELLE ROUND 34". DFB. Retrieved 10 October 2013.

External linksEdit