1925 Belgian general election

General elections were held in Belgium on 5 April 1925.[1] The result was a victory for the Belgian Labour Party, which won 78 of the 187 seats in the Chamber of Representatives.[2] Voter turnout was 92.8% in the Chamber election and 92.7% in the Senate election.[3]

1925 Belgian general election

← 1921 5 April 1925 1929 →

187 seats in the Chamber of Representatives
93 seats in the Senate
  First party Second party Third party
  No image.png Brussels, Palais de la Nation, Aloys Van de Vyvere.jpg No image.png
Leader Joseph Van Roosbroeck Aloys Van de Vyvere Édouard Pecher
Party Labour Catholic Liberal
Leader since 1918 Candidate for PM 1924
Last election 68 seats, 34.81% 70 seats, 34.02% 33 seats, 17.80%
Seats won 78 78 23
Seat change Increase 10 Increase 8 Decrease 10
Popular vote 821,116 778,366 304,757
Percentage 39.48% 37.42% 14.65%
Swing Increase 4.47% Increase 3.40% Decrease 3.15%

Government before election

Theunis I
Catholic-Liberal

Elected Government

Van de Vyvere
Catholic

An extra seat in the Chamber of Representatives was assigned to the arrondissement of Verviers, after the annexation of Eupen-Malmedy.

Following the elections, Aloys Van de Vyvere formed a Catholic minority government. After he failed to receive the confidence of the other parties in parliament, a Catholic-Labour government was formed led by Prosper Poullet.

ResultsEdit

Chamber of RepresentativesEdit

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Belgian Labour Party 821,116 39.48 78 +10
Catholic Party 778,336 37.42 78 +8
Liberal Party 304,757 14.65 23 –10
Frontpartij 80,407 3.87 6 +2
Communist Party of Belgium 34,149 1.64 2 New
Other parties 61,858 2.97 0 –1
Invalid/blank votes 0
Total 2,080,047 100 187 +1
Source: Belgian Elections

SenateEdit

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Belgian Labour Party 828,854 40.87 39 +6
Catholic Party 757,804 37.36 38 +4
Liberal Party 324,823 16.02 13 –5
Catholic Dissidents 52,286 2.58 3 New
Other parties 64,430 3.18 0 0
Invalid/blank votes 0
Total 2,028,197 100 93 0
Source: Belgian Elections

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dieter Nohlen & Philip Stöver (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p289 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, p308
  3. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, p290