1901 Ohio State Buckeyes football team

The 1901 Ohio State Buckeyes football team was an American football team that represented Ohio State University as an independent during the 1901 college football season. In its third and final season under head coach John B. Eckstorm, the team compiled a 5–3–1 record and outscored opponents by a total of 94 to 56.[1] J. M. Kittle was the team captain.[2]

1901 Ohio State Buckeyes football
ConferenceIndependent
Record5–3–1
Head coach
CaptainJ. M. Kittle
Home stadiumOhio Field
Seasons
← 1900
1902 →
1901 Midwestern college football independents records
Conf Overall
Team W   L   T W   L   T
Saint Louis     10 0 0
North Dakota Agricultural     7 0 0
Marquette     4 0 1
Northern Illinois State     6 1 0
Notre Dame     8 1 1
Ohio Wesleyan     8 2 0
Nebraska     6 2 0
Ohio     6 1 2
Doane     3 1 0
Haskell     6 2 0
Lake Forest     10 5 0
Ohio State     5 3 1
Washington University     5 3 1
Ohio Medical     5 3 1
Iowa State Normal     5 3 2
Beloit     5 3 3
Washburn     3 2 3
Carthage     1 1 0
Drake     4 4 0
Detroit College     3 3 0
Mount Union     5 5 1
Wittenberg     4 4 0
Kansas State     3 4 1
Michigan Agricultural     3 4 1
Iowa State     2 6 2
Kansas     3 5 2
Wabash     4 7 0
Fairmount     3 6 0
Heidelberg     1 3 1
Miami (OH)     1 3 1
Cincinnati     1 4 1
Case     2 7 0
Missouri     1 6 1
Butler     0 1 0
Chicago Eclectic Medical     0 3 0

During the 1901 season, support for the Ohio State football team grew, and for the first time, the program generated a profit for the university athletic association.[3]

On October 26, 1901, John Sigrist, who played center-rush, sustained a broken vertebrae in a game against Western Reserve. He died from his injuries two days later.[4] He remains the only Ohio State player to have died from injuries sustained in a game.[5]

ScheduleEdit

DateOpponentSiteResultAttendanceSource
September 28OtterbeinT 0–0
October 5Wittenberg
  • Ohio Field
  • Columbus, OH
W 30–0[6]
October 12Ohio
  • Ohio Field
  • Columbus, OH
W 17–0[7]
October 19Marietta
  • Ohio Field
  • Columbus, OH
W 24–0
October 26Western Reserve
  • Ohio Field
  • Columbus, OH
W 6–5
November 9Michigan
L 0–214,000[8]
November 16at OberlinOberlin, OHL 0–6[9]
November 23Indiana
  • Ohio Field
  • Columbus, OH
L 6–18[10]
November 28Kenyon
  • Ohio Field
  • Columbus, OH
W 11–63,500[11]

Game summariesEdit

Week 6: MichiganEdit

Michigan at Ohio State
1 2Total
Michigan 16 5 21
Ohio State 0 0 0

On November 9, 1901, undefeated Ohio State, having allowed opponents to score only five points in five prior games, faced an undefeated Michigan team coached by Fielding H. Yost that had not allowed opponents to score in six previous games. The 1901 game was the third meeting in what would become the Michigan–Ohio State football rivalry, with the two teams having played to a scoreless tie in their previous match in 1900.[12]

The Buckeyes lost the 1901 game to the Wolverines by a 21–0 score in front of 4,000 spectators at Ohio Field. Prior to the game, the head coaches argued over the length of the game, Yost of Michigan insisting on regulation halves of 30 minute and Ohio State's Eckstorm insisting that the first half be limited to 25 minutes. When the umpire threatened Ohio State with a forfeiture, coach Eckstrom agreed to play regulation halves of 30 minutes.[8][13]

The Detroit Free Press noted that Ohio State's players sought to slow the pace of the game. The paper noted: "On almost every scrimmage some Ohio man would stretch out on the ground and take his full time. This playing for wind was so apparent that the Michigan players finally burlesqued it. The Ohio men could not stand the gaff, and their doctors and trainer ran more yards than both teams put together."[8] After the game, coach Yost commented on Ohio State's tactic: "Their laying down for time took much of the vim out of our team, and rested their tired out players."[13]

Ohio Governor George K. Nash attended the game and said afterward: "Football is a great game for young men who are physically fit for such a contest, and I enjoyed the game immensely, although I regretted to see our state team lose, but Michigan is entitled to the victory, and I think she was aware she had a game on her hands."[14]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2018 Ohio State Media Guide" (PDF). Ohio State University. 2018. p. 247. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  2. ^ 2018 Ohio State Media Guide, p. 120.
  3. ^ 2018 Ohio State Media Guide, p. 80.
  4. ^ "John Sigrist of the Ohio State University, Dies at Columbus, Yesterday". The Cincinnati Enquirer. October 29, 1901. p. 6 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "The Tragic Story of John Sigrist". The Columbus Dispatch. October 28, 2011.
  6. ^ "Champions in Shape". The Cincinnati Enquirer. October 6, 1901. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "O.S.U. Won But Neither Side Scored in the First Half". The Cincinnati Enquirer. October 13, 1901. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ a b c "Michigan's Line Is Uncrossed: Only Once Did Ohio Threaten Goal". Detroit Free Press. November 10, 1901. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Oberlin Wins the Championship". The Pittsburg Post. November 17, 1901. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Indiana, 18; Ohio, 6". The Inter Ocean. November 24, 1901. p. 18 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Ohio Defeats Kenyon". The Indianapolis Journal. November 29, 1901. p. 5 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Michigan vs. Ohio State". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Archived from the original on May 23, 2015. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  13. ^ a b "Michigan Line Is Uncrossed (part 2)". Detroit Free Press. November 10, 1901. p. 8.
  14. ^ "Gov. Nash Saw Michigan Win". Detroit Free Press. November 10, 1901. p. 8.