1872 United States presidential election in Georgia

The 1872 United States presidential election in Georgia took place on November 5, 1872, as part of the 1872 United States presidential election. Voters chose 11 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

1872 United States presidential election in Georgia
Flag of the State of Georgia (non-official).svg
← 1868 November 5, 1872 1876 →
  Horace Greeley restored (cropped).jpg UlyssesGrant.jpg
Nominee Horace Greeley Ulysses S. Grant
Party Liberal Republican Republican
Home state New York Illinois
Running mate Benjamin G. Brown Henry Wilson
Electoral vote 0 (+3 rejected)[a] 0
Popular vote 76,356 62,550
Percentage 54.97% 45.03%

Georgia Presidential Election Results 1872.svg
County Results

President before election

Ulysses S. Grant
Republican

Elected President

Ulysses S. Grant
Republican

Georgia voted for the Liberal Republican candidate, Horace Greeley, over Republican candidate, Ulysses S. Grant. Greeley won Georgia by a margin of 9.94%. However, Greeley died prior to the Electoral College meeting, allowing Georgia's 11 electors to vote for the candidate of their choice: 6 voted for Greeley's running mate, B. Gratz Brown, and 2 for Charles Jenkins.[1] 3 electors attempted to vote for the deceased Greeley, but their votes were rejected after a House of Representatives resolution.[2]

Georgia was one of only two former Confederate states (along with Texas) that didn't vote Republican during the reconstruction elections of 1868, 1872, and 1876. During these elections, Southern Republicans were briefly empowered by newly registered black voters who would soon become disenfranchised again by anti-black laws known as black codes or Jim Crow laws in the late 1870s and 1880s.[3] Despite failing to carry the state, Grant's 45.03% of the vote stood as the best performance by a Republican in Georgia until Barry Goldwater finally carried the state in 1964, 92 years later.

This was the last time the Republican candidate carried Greene, Fannin, and Pickens county until 1884; the last time they carried Polk, Haralson, Thomas, and Clay counties until 1896; the last time they carried Gilmer and Dawson counties until 1904; the last time a Republican carried Fulton county, home to Atlanta, until 1928; the last time they carried Bryan, Charlton, Lowndes, Harris, Houston, Putnam, Pike, Clayton, and Fayette counties until 1964, and the last time they won Coweta, Meriwether, Butts, Newton, and Clarke counties until 1972, when Richard Nixon swept every county in Georgia.[4]

ResultsEdit

United States presidential election in Georgia, 1872[5][6][7]
Party Candidate Running mate Popular vote Electoral vote
Count % Count %
Liberal Republican Benjamin G. Brown of Missouri N/A of 6 54.55%
Democratic Charles J. Jenkins of Georgia N/A of 2 18.18%
Liberal Republican Horace Greely of New York Benjamin Gratz Brown of Missouri 76,356 54.97% 0 (+3 rejected)[a] 0.00%
Republican Ulysses S. Grant of Illinois Henry Wilson of Massachusetts 62,550 45.03% 0 0.00%
Total 138,906 100.00% 8 100.00%

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ a b Greeley died after the election, but prior to the Electoral College meeting, and was thus ineligible for the office of President. Greeley had won 11 pledged electors, of which 8 cast their votes for other Democrats. 3 electors voted for Greeley; however, their votes were rejected.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "American presidential election, 1872". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 10 December 2017.
  2. ^ "Electoral Votes for President and Vice President 1869-1877". U.S. Electoral College. U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved 10 December 2017.
  3. ^ "Reconstruction | Definition, Summary, Timeline & Facts | Britannica". www.britannica.com. Retrieved 2022-06-20.
  4. ^ "Presidential election of 1872 - Map by counties". geoelections.free.fr. Retrieved 2022-06-20.
  5. ^ "1872 Presidential General Election Results - Georgia". U.S. Election Atlas. Retrieved 10 December 2017.
  6. ^ "1872 Presidential Election". The American Presidency Project. University of California Santa Barbara. Retrieved 10 December 2017.
  7. ^ "Electoral Votes for President and Vice President 1869-1877". U.S. Electoral College. U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved 6 December 2017.