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1016 Anitra, provisional designation 1924 QG, is a stony Florian asteroid and suspected asynchronous binary system from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 10 kilometers in diameter.

1016 Anitra
Discovery [1]
Discovered byK. Reinmuth
Discovery siteHeidelberg Obs.
Discovery date31 January 1924
Designations
MPC designation(1016) Anitra
Named after
fictional character
in drama Peer Gynt[2]
1924 QG · 1929 TE1
main-belt · (inner)[3]
Flora[4]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc93.42 yr (34,123 days)
Aphelion2.5035 AU
Perihelion1.9356 AU
2.2196 AU
Eccentricity0.1279
3.31 yr (1,208 days)
176.01°
0° 17m 53.16s / day
Inclination6.0352°
8.8588°
53.320°
Known satellites1[5][6]
Physical characteristics
Dimensions9.539±0.078 km[7]
10.302±0.068 km[8]
12.97 km (calculated)[3]
5.928±0.001 h[9]
5.9288±0.0005 h[10]
5.929±0.001 h[11]
5.9295±0.0005 h[12]
5.92951 h[3]
5.9294±0.0001 h[6]
5.9300±0.0001 h[6]
5.930 h[13]
5.93 h[a]
5.9301±0.0003 h[14]
0.20 (assumed)[3]
0.2728±0.0572[8]
0.308±0.048[7]
SMASS = S[1] · S[3]
11.8[3] · 11.9[1] · 12.0[8]

It was discovered on 31 January 1924, by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at the Heidelberg-Königstuhl State Observatory in southwest Germany.[15] The asteroid was likely named after the fictional character Anitra from Henrik Ibsen's drama Peer Gynt.[2]

Orbit and classificationEdit

Anitra is a member of the Flora family (402), a giant asteroid family and the largest family of stony asteroids in the main-belt.[4][16]:23

It orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.9–2.5 AU once every 3 years and 4 months (1,208 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.13 and an inclination of 6° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The asteroid's observation arc begins at Heidelberg, 12 days after to its official discovery observation.[15]

Physical characteristicsEdit

In the SMASS classification, Anitra is a common, stony S-type asteroid.[1]

Rotation periodEdit

In November 2015, a rotational lightcurve of Anitra was obtained from photometric observations by an international collaborations of astronomers who combined their observational results. Lightcurve analysis gave a rotation period of 5.92951 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.30 magnitude (U=3).[6]

Binary systemEdit

Anitra is a suspected asynchronous binary asteroid, a system with a fairly large separation, for which tidal forces have been insufficient to synchronize the periods within the system's lifetime.[5][6] The likely minor-planet moon has a rotation period of 2.609 hours and is thought to orbit its primary every 240 hours. The results, however, are still tentative.[3] More than 100 known binaries from the asteroid belt have already been discovered.

Diameter and albedoEdit

According to the survey carried out by the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Anitra measures 9.539 and 10.302 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo of 0.2728 and 0.308, respectively.[7][8]

The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes a standard albedo for stony S-type asteroids of 0.20 and calculates a diameter of 12.97 kilometers based on an absolute magnitude of 11.8.[3]

NamingEdit

This minor planet was probably named after the Arabian dancer Anitra, daughter of a Bedouin chief in Henrik Ibsen's drama Peer Gynt, a five-act play in verse. The music was composed by Edvard Grieg who named one piece "Anitra's Dance".[2] The minor planets (4872) and (5696) are named after Grieg and Ibsen, respectively.[2]

The official naming citation is based on research by Lutz Schmadel and feedback from astronomers R. Bremer and I. van Houten-Groeneveld.[2]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Menke (2011) web: rotation period 5.93 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.50 magnitude and a quality code of 2. Summary figures at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1016 Anitra (1924 QG)" (2017-07-05 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). "(1016) Anitra". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1016) Anitra. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. pp. 87–88. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-29925-7_1017. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "LCDB Data for (1016) Anitra". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Small Bodies Data Ferret". Nesvorny HCM Asteroid Families V3.0. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  5. ^ a b Johnston, Robert (16 July 2017). "(1016) Anitra". johnstonsarchive.net. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  6. ^ a b c d e Pilcher, Frederick; Benishek, Vladimir; Jacobsen, Jens; Kristensen, Leif Hugo; Lang, Kim; Larsen, Frank R.; et al. (July 2016). "Minor Planet 1016 Anitra: A Likely Asynchronous Binary". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (3): 274–277. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43..274P. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  7. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  8. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90.
  9. ^ Pray, Donald P.; Galad, Adrian; Gajdos, Stefan; Vilagi, Jozef; Cooney, Walt; Gross, John; et al. (December 2006). "Lightcurve analysis of asteroids 53, 698, 1016, 1523, 1950, 4608, 5080 6170, 7760, 8213, 11271, 14257, 15350 and 17509". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 33 (4): 92–95. Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...92P. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  10. ^ Kryszczynska, A.; Colas, F.; Polinska, M.; Hirsch, R.; Ivanova, V.; Apostolovska, G.; et al. (October 2012). "Do Slivan states exist in the Flora family?. I. Photometric survey of the Flora region". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 546: 51. Bibcode:2012A&A...546A..72K. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219199. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  11. ^ Alkema, Michael S. (July 2013). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at Elephant Head Observatory: 2012 November - 2013 April". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 40 (3): 133–137. Bibcode:2013MPBu...40..133A. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  12. ^ Klinglesmith, Daniel K., III (October 2017). "Asteroids Observed from Estcorn Observatory". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 44 (4): 345–348. Bibcode:2017MPBu...44..345K. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 17 October 2017.
  13. ^ Menke, John L. (September 2005). "Lightcurves and periods for asteroids 471 Papagena, 675 Ludmilla, 1016 Anitra, 1127 Mimi, 1165 Imprinetta, 1171 Rustahawelia, and 2283 Bunke". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 32 (3): 64–66. Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...64M. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  14. ^ Schmidt, Richard E. (April 2016). "NIR Minor Planet Photometry form Burleith Observatory, 2015". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (2): 129–131. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43..129S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  15. ^ a b "1016 Anitra (1924 QG)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  16. ^ Nesvorný, D.; Broz, M.; Carruba, V. (December 2014). Identification and Dynamical Properties of Asteroid Families. Asteroids IV. pp. 297–321. arXiv:1502.01628. Bibcode:2015aste.book..297N. doi:10.2458/azu_uapress_9780816532131-ch016. ISBN 9780816532131.

External linksEdit