¡Basta Ya! (song)

"¡Basta Ya!" (English: "Enough!") is a song by Puerto Rican singer Olga Tañón from her fourth studio album, Nuevos Senderos (1996). The song was written and produced by Marco Antonio Solís. It was released as the lead single from the album in 1996. "A ballad, the song is about unrequited love and marked a musical departure from Tañón's merengue recordings. The song was nominated for Pop Song of the Year at the 1997 Lo Nuestro Awards. Commercially, it topped both the Billboard Hot Latin Songs and Latin Pop Airplay charts in the United States. A music video for the song was filmed and features a couple's failing relationship.

"¡Basta Ya!"
Bastaya.jpg
Single by Olga Tañón
from the album Nuevos Senderos
Released1996
Recorded1995
StudioMarco Musical Estudio, Mexico City, Mexico
Length4:20
LabelWEA Latina
Songwriter(s)Marco Antonio Solís
Producer(s)Marco Antonio Solís
Olga Tañón singles chronology
"Una Noche Más"
(1995)
"¡Basta Ya!"
(1996)
"Me Subes, Me Bajas, Me Subes"
(1996)

"¡Basta Ya!" was later covered by both Conjunto Primavera in 2007 and by American singer Jenni Rivera. Conjunto Primavera's version also topped the Hot Latin Songs chart as well as the Regional Mexican Airplay chart in the US. Rivera recorded a pop and banda rendition of the song for her 12th and final studio albums, Joyas Prestadas (2011) with Solís performing alongside her. She recorded a music video for her cover in Los Angeles, California. In Mexico, her version topped the Monitor Latino chart and reached three on the Billboard Mexican Airplay, while it peaked at number 14 and number six on the Hot Latin Songs and Regional Mexican Airplay charts in the US, respectively. Solís was presented with the ASCAP Latin Award in both 2008 and 2012 for the respective cover versions.

Background and compositionEdit

 
Marco Antonio Solís (pictured) composed and produced "¡Basta Ya" for Olga Tañón's studio album Nuevos Senderos; Solís would later provide his vocals for Jenni Rivera's cover in 2011.

Since 1992, Tañón launched her solo career as a merengue singer. She released three studio albums: Sola (1992), Mujer de Fuego (1993), Siente el Amor (1994), the latter of which became the most successful, reaching the top five on the Billboard Top Latin Albums chart in the United States.[1] On November 1995, Tañón announced that she had finished recording an album of ballads with Mexican singer-songwriter Marco Antonio Solís, the former lead vocalist of Los Bukis, producing it and composing all but one of the tracks.[2] The album's title, Nuevos Senderos, was announced a month later.[3] According to Tañón, she wanted to record an album of ballads because of her originally performing under that genre prior to singing merengue as well as a desire to collaborate with Solís.[4] Nuevos Senderos was recorded in Solís's recording studio, Marco Musical Estudio, in Mexico City, Mexico, and released on April 1996.[5][6] One of the songs Solís wrote and composed for the album was "¡Basta Ya!", a ballad that tells of a "soaring story of unrequited love".[7]

Promotion and receptionEdit

"¡Basta Ya!" was released as the lead single from the album in 1996.[8] A music video was made for the song, which shows a couple's relationship deteriorating before the lead actress leaves her lover.[9] The Dallas Morning News critic Mario Tarradell felt that the song "summarizes" Tañón's "creative departure in four minutes".[7] At the 9th Annual Lo Nuestro Awards in 1997, it was nominated in the category of Pop Song of the Year,[10] but lost to "Experiencia Religiosa" by Enrique Iglesias.[11] A live version of the track was recorded for Tañón's album Olga Viva, Viva Olga (1999).[12] In the US, "¡Basta Ya!" reached the top of the Billboard Hot Latin Songs and Latin Pop Airplay charts.[13][14]

Cover versionsEdit

"¡Basta Ya!" was covered by Mexican musical group Conjunto Primavera (left) in 2007 and American singer Jenni Rivera (right) in 2011.

Mexican norteño band Conjunto Primavera covered "¡Basta Ya!" on their studio album El Amor Que Nunca Fue (2007) as an uptempo polka song.[15] Their version also topped the Hot Latin Songs chart as well as the Regional Mexican Airplay chart in the US.[16][17] On the 2007 year-end charts, it ended as the sixth best-performing song of the year on the Hot Latin Songs chart and number seven on the Regional Mexican Airplay chart.[18][19] Conjunto Primavera delivered a performance of the song during 2008 in Chihuahua, Mexico, which was later released on their live album En Vivo (2010).[20]

American singer Jenni Rivera's rendition of"¡Basta Ya!" was recorded for her 12th and final studio albums Joyas Prestadas: Pop and Joyas Prestadas: Banda (2011).[21] She recorded a pop ballad version and banda for each album, respectively.[22] Solís performs as a background vocalist and is credited as a featured artist for the track.[21] Both versions of "¡Basta Ya!" were released as the lead single from the albums on August 29, 2011.[23]

The music video for Rivera's version was directed by Ricardo Moreno and filmed in Los Angeles, California.[24] A live version of the song was recorded at the Teatro de la Ciudad in Mexico City for the deluxe edition of Joyas Prestadas, which was released on August 28, 2012.[25] On December 8, 2012, Rivera performed the song during her final concert in Monterrey, Mexico, hours before her death. The show was later released as her album 1969 – Siempre, En Vivo Desde Monterrey, Parte 2 (2014).[26] In Mexico, the song topped the Monitor Latino chart and reached number three on the Billboard Mexican Airplay chart.[27][28] In the US, the song peaked at number 14 on the Hot Latin Songs chart and number six on the Regional Mexican Airplay chart.[29][30] Solís was awarded in 2008 and 2012 in the Regional Mexican field at the ASCAP Latin Awards for the respective cover versions.[31][32]

ChartsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Birchmeier, Jason. "Olga Tañón | Biography & History". AllMusic. Archived from the original on April 14, 2021. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  2. ^ Reséndez, Héctor (November 25, 1995). "News from U.S. and Latin America" (PDF). Cashbox: 15. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 14, 2021. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  3. ^ Lannert, John (December 23, 1995). "Latin Notas". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 107 (51): 52. ISSN 0006-2510. Archived from the original on April 14, 2021. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  4. ^ Reséndez, Héctor (March 16, 1996). "News from U.S. and Latin America" (PDF). Cashbox: 20. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 14, 2021. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  5. ^ Reséndez, Héctor (May 11, 1996). "Reviews" (PDF). Cashbox: 19. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 17, 2021. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  6. ^ Henderson, Alex. "Nuevos Senderos – Olga Tañón | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on April 23, 2019. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  7. ^ a b Tarradell, Mario (May 5, 1996). "Pantera sticks with". The Dallas Morning News. p. 10C.
  8. ^ "Olga Tañón presenta Abriendo 'Nuevo senderos'". El Siglo de Torreón (in Spanish). May 20, 1996. p. 39. Archived from the original on April 14, 2021. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  9. ^ Tañón, Olga (performer) (1996). ¡Basta Ya! (Television). Warner Music.
  10. ^ "Premios a Lo Mejor De La Música Latina". El Tiempo (in Spanish). Casa Editorial El Tiempo S.A. April 8, 1997. Archived from the original on September 8, 2013. Retrieved June 10, 2013.
  11. ^ "Lo Nuestro – Historia" (in Spanish). Univision. Archived from the original on June 26, 2015. Retrieved March 8, 2014.
  12. ^ Birchmeier, Jason. "Olga Viva, Viva Olga – Olga Tañón | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on April 23, 2019. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  13. ^ a b "Olga Tanon Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  14. ^ a b "Olga Tanon Chart History (Latin Pop Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  15. ^ Henderson, Alex. "El Amor Que Nunca Fue – Conjunto Primavera | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on December 29, 2019. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  16. ^ a b "Conjunto Primavera Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  17. ^ a b "Conjunto Primavera Chart History (Regional Mexican Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  18. ^ a b "Hot Latin Songs – Year-End: 2007". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 2007. Archived from the original on November 14, 2020. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  19. ^ a b "Regional Mexican Airplay Songs – Year-End: 2007". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 2007. Archived from the original on April 5, 2018. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  20. ^ "En Vivo (Live Chihuahua, México/2008) – Conjunto Primavera | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on December 29, 2019. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  21. ^ a b Jeffries, David. "Joyas Prestadas – Jenni Rivera | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on April 11, 2019. Retrieved April 15, 2021. Marco Antonio Solís is credited as a featured on the back cover of the album.
  22. ^ "Escucha lo nuevo de Jenni Rivera en banda y en pop". People en Español (in Spanish). September 2, 2011. Archived from the original on October 23, 2011. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  23. ^ "Jenni Rivera estrena sencillo de su nuevo álbum, 'Joyas Prestadas'". Diario Libre (in Spanish). August 29, 2011. Archived from the original on April 17, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  24. ^ "Jenni Rivera estrena video 'Basta Ya'". Univision. October 21, 2011. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved August 8, 2013.
  25. ^ "Jenni Rivera lanzó edición 'Deluxe' de 'Joyas prestadas'" (in Spanish). Univision. August 30, 2012. Archived from the original on August 6, 2013. Retrieved August 8, 2013.
  26. ^ Jeffries, David. "1969: Siempre, En Vivo Desde Monterrey, Pt. 2 – Jenni Rivera | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  27. ^ a b "Top 20 General" (in Spanish). Monitor Latino. November 6, 2011. Archived from the original on November 9, 2011. Retrieved May 10, 2012.
  28. ^ a b "Jenni Rivera Chart History (Mexico Airplay)". Billboard. Archived from the original on April 17, 2021. Retrieved April 19, 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  29. ^ "Jenni Rivera Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Archived from the original on April 12, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  30. ^ "Jenni Rivera Chart History (Regional Mexican Airplay)". Billboard. Archived from the original on January 31, 2020. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  31. ^ "16th Annual El Premio ASCAP 2008 – El Premio Home". American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. May 16, 2008. Archived from the original on October 16, 2012. Retrieved April 13, 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  32. ^ "20th Annual El Premio ASCAP 2012 – Regional Mexican". American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. March 20, 2012. Archived from the original on January 20, 2015. Retrieved April 13, 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  33. ^ "Jenni Rivera Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  34. ^ "Jenni Rivera Chart History (Regional Mexican Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  35. ^ a b "1996: The Year in Music". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 108 (52): YE-64, 68. December 28, 1996. ISSN 0006-2510. Archived from the original on April 14, 2021. Retrieved September 26, 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  36. ^ "Regional Mexican Airplay Songs – Year-End: 2012". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 2012. Archived from the original on April 17, 2021. Retrieved April 19, 2021.