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William Starr Miller II

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William Starr Miller II (October 26, 1856 – September 14, 1935) was a prominent New York industrialist and real estate operator.[1]

William Starr Miller II
Born(1856-10-26)October 26, 1856
DiedSeptember 14, 1935(1935-09-14) (aged 78)
New York City, New York, U.S.
Resting placeGreen-Wood Cemetery
Residence1048 Fifth Avenue
Alma materHarvard University
Columbia Law School
Spouse(s)
Edith Caroline Warren
(m. 1886; his death 1935)
ChildrenEdith Starr Miller
Parent(s)George Norton Miller
Sarah Caroline Tucker Chace
RelativesWilliam S. Miller (uncle)
Baron Queenborough (son-in-law)

Early lifeEdit

Miller was born in New York City on October 26, 1856. He was a son of George Norton Miller I (1805–1891)[2] and Sarah Caroline Tucker (nee Chace) (1832–1872),[3] who were married on October 9, 1855 in Boston, Massachusetts. William was named in honor of his father's brother of the same name,[4] William Starr Miller I (1793–1854), who served as a Representative from New York in the 29th United States Congress and died about before William II was born.[5] His siblings were George Norton Miller Jr. (1857–1935) and Horatio Ray Miller (1861–1905).[4]

William Starr Miller II attended Harvard University from 1874 to 1878, graduating with an A.B. degree in 1878. He then attended Columbia Law School, where he graduated in 1880 with an LL.B. degree.[1]

CareerEdit

In 1880, he was admitted to the New York City Bar.[6] His original business address was 39 Fifth Avenue, Manhattan, New York.

Miller was a member of the Knickerbocker Club and the Union Club of New York.[1]

ResidenceEdit

Miller commissioned his brother-in-law, Whitney Warren, a partner in Warren and Wetmore, to design them a French Norman-style "cottage" in Newport, Rhode Island named High Tide, with interiors by noted designer Ogden Codman. They turned to architects Carrère and Hastings, however, for their New York City residence at 1048 Fifth Avenue, in Manhattan.[7][8] This house became the Neue Galerie in 2001.[9]

Personal lifeEdit

 
Miller's wife, Edith Caroline Warren, by Jules Joseph Lefebvre, 1885

On April 28, 1886, Miller married Edith Caroline Warren (1866–1944). She was a daughter of George Henry Warren (1823–1892) and Mary Caroline Phoenix (1832–1901). Her father was one of the founders of the New York Metropolitan Opera and her brother was the architect Whitney Warren. Together, they were the parents of:

Miller died on September 14, 1935, at his Fifth Avenue mansion.[1] Miller, his wife, his parents, and several of his other close relatives are all buried in Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn.[15][16]

DescendantsEdit

Through his daughter Edith, he was the grandfather of Audrey Elizabeth Paget (1922–1990), an aviator, Enid Louise Paget (b. 1923), and Cicilie Carol Paget (1928–2013).[10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "WILLIAM STARR MILLER". The New York Times. 15 September 1935. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  2. ^ (July 27, 1805 - March 10, 1891)
  3. ^ (July 2, 1832 - July 19, 1872) - She was a daughter of Caleb Chase (Chace), Jr. (September 3, 1799 - February 7, 1865) and Sarah Ann Morgan (July 1, 1806 - January 25, 1844). Caleb Chase, Jr. and his wife Sarah are both buried in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  4. ^ a b Hanson, Conrad (April 9, 2017). "Rockledge, Rhinebeck's Gilded Age Enigma". Schoolfield Country House. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  5. ^ "MILLER, William Starr - Biographical Information". bioguide.congress.gov. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  6. ^ Harvard University Class of 1878 (1908). Harvard University Secretary's Report. Riverside Press. p. 66. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  7. ^ Goldberger, Paul (26 November 2001). "A Face-Lift on Fifth". The New Yorker. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  8. ^ Dunlap, David W. (8 November 1993). "Mansion Sale to Make Way for New Art Museum". The New York Times. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  9. ^ Ossman, Laurie; Ewing, Heather (2011). Carrère and Hastings, The Masterworks. Rizzoli USA. ISBN 9780847835645.
  10. ^ a b "Lady Queenborough Dies in Paris at 45. Former Edith Stair Miller of New York Was Wed to British Baron in 1921". New York Times. January 17, 1933. Retrieved September 27, 2017.
  11. ^ "LORD QUEENBOROUGH WEDS MISS MILLER; British Peer Quietly Marries Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Starr Miller IN FIFTH AVENUE HOME Thirty Relatives at Second Marriage of Son-in-Law of Late W.C. Whitney--Sail Soon for England. Bride's Father Gives Her Away. Lord Queenborough's Second Marriage. Widely Known Sportsman. Gallagher--Sleicher". The New York Times. 20 July 1921. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  12. ^ "QUEENBOROUGH, 88, A BARON, ONCE M. P.; Former Cowpuncher Who Came to U. S. With £5 in Youth and Made a Fortune Dies". The New York Times. 23 September 1949. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  13. ^ Lady Queensborough; de Shishmareff, Paquita (1931). Occult Theocrasy. Chatou, France: British American Press.
  14. ^ Parfrey, Adam; Thomas, Kenn (2008). Secret and Suppressed II: Banned Ideas and Hidden History Into the 21st Century. Feral House. p. 277. ISBN 9781932595352. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  15. ^ Section 20, Lot 6125.
  16. ^ "Brooklyn's Green-Wood Cemetery Landmarks Get Makeover". newyorkhistoryblog.org. The New York History Blog. 9 May 2017. Retrieved 27 September 2017.

External linksEdit