William Bull II

William Bull II (September 24, 1710 – July 4, 1791) was a landowner who was for many years (1759–1775) the lieutenant governor of the province of South Carolina and served as acting governor on five occasions. A Loyalist, he left the colony in 1782 when British troops were evacuated at the end of the American Revolutionary War, and he died in London.

William Bull II
24th Governor of South Carolina (Acting)
In office
5 April 1760 – 22 December 1761
MonarchGeorge II
George III
Preceded byThomas Pownall
Succeeded byThomas Boone (governor)
In office
14 May 1764 – 12 June 1766
MonarchGeorge III
Preceded byThomas Boone (governor)
Succeeded byLord Charles Greville Montagu
In office
May 1768 – 30 October 1768
MonarchGeorge III
Preceded byLord Charles Greville Montagu
Succeeded byLord Charles Greville Montagu
In office
31 July 1769 – 15 September 1771
MonarchGeorge III
Preceded byLord Charles Greville Montagu
Succeeded byLord Charles Greville Montagu
In office
6 March 1773 – 18 June 1775
MonarchGeorge III
Preceded byLord Charles Greville Montagu
Succeeded byLord William Campbell
3rd Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina
In office
March 21, 1755 – March 26, 1776
GovernorJames Glen

William Lyttelton
Thomas Boone
Lord Charles Montagu

Lord William Campbell
Preceded byWilliam Bull I
Succeeded byHenry Laurens
(as Vice President of South Carolina
Personal details
Born(1710-09-24)September 24, 1710
Charleston County, South Carolina, US
DiedJuly 4, 1791(1791-07-04) (aged 80)
London, England, UK

William (Guilielmus) Bull matriculated at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands 10 October 1732[1].[2][3] He received his Medical Doctor degree from the University of Leiden on 13 April 1734.[4] The title description of his thesis is: Dissertatio medica inauguralis de colica pictonum. Quam … pro gradu Doctoratus, summisque in Medicina honoribus & privilegiis rite ac legitime consequendis, eruditorum examini submittit Guilielmus Bull … ad diem 18. Augusti 1734. hora locoque solitis. - Lugduni Batavorum  : apud Gerardum Potvliet, 1734. - 19,[1]p. ; 4to.[5][6][7]

On title-page he is described as "Anglus ex Carolina." Dedicated to his father, William Bull, King's Counsel of South Carolina. In the thesis, he makes reference to "Townium Anglium qui ad colicam refert." Born in South Carolina, 1710, he is said to have been the first from the American Continent to graduate at Leyden.[8] But Roland Cotton (born Hampton, N.H., August 29, 1674) received his Ph.D. at the University of Harderwijk in the Netherlands on October 8, 1697.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ English-speaking students of medicine at the University of Leyden / R.W. Innes Smith. - Edinburgh/London : Oliver and Boyd, 1932, p. 36.
  2. ^ Album Studiosorum Academiae Lugduno Batavae MDLXXV-MDCCCLXXV, kol. 949.
  3. ^ Index to English speaking students who have graduated at Leyden university / by Edward Peacock, F.S.A. - London : For the Index society, by Longmans, Green & co. 1883, p. 15, 949.
  4. ^ Bronnen tot de geschiedenis der Leidsche Universiteit, vijfde deel, 10 Febr. 1725-8 Febr. 1765 : Catalogus promotorum ex die 13. Februarii anni 1725 / P.C. Molhuysen. - 's-Gravenhage : Martinus Nijhoff, 1921, p. 235.
  5. ^ Bibliotheca medica neerlandica: Catalogus van de bibliotheek der Nederlandsche maatschappij tot bevordering der geneeskunst Aanwinsten…, 1899 - 1930. - Amstelodami : Menno Hertzberger, 1930. - Vol. 1, p. 263.
  6. ^ National Union Catalogue: NB 0945163; DNLM.
  7. ^ A catalogue of eighteenth century medical and scientific imprints from the Dutch- and German-language areas of Europe held by selected Edinburgh libraries. Series 2: Low Countries imprints. Volume 2: Edinburgh University Library, National Library of Scotland, Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, Royal Botanic Garden, Royal Observatory Edinburgh / [comp.] W.A. Kell. - Edinburgh : Scottish Centre for the Book Napier University, 2008, B255 Harskamp 1647. Location: EUL [P.818(11)].
  8. ^ English-speaking students of medicine at the University of Leyden / R.W. Innes Smith. - Edinburgh/London : Oliver and Boyd, 1932, p. 36.
  9. ^ Het Album promotorum van de Academie te Harderwijk, p. 88.