Wikipedia:WikiProject Tropical cyclones/Project resources

Welcome to WikiProject Tropical cyclones' project resources page, which provides helpful links that can easily be utilized as sources or general research on tropical cyclones. These sources are generally considered reliable and verifiable information. If you found a useful link that has not been included here, feel free to add it to the appropriate section. Furthermore, if you find a link here that no longer functions, feel free to remove it. For convenience some links are repeated.

General linksEdit

Jack Beven's Weekly Tropical Discussions
1991 - 001, 002, 003, 004, 005, 006, 007, 008, 009, 010, 011, 012, 013, 014, 015, 016, 017, 018, 019, 020, 021, 022.
1992 - 023, 024, 025, 026, 027, 028, 029, 030, 031, 032, 033, 034, 035, 036, 037, 038, 039, 040, 041, 042, 043,044, 045, 046, 047, 048, 049, 050, 051, 052, 053, 054, 055, 056, 057, 058, 059, 060, 061, 062, 063, 064, 065, 066, 067, 068,069,070,071,072,073, 074.
1993 - 075, 076, 077 078 079, 080 081, 082, 083, 084, 085, 086, 087, 089, 090, 091, 092, 093, 094, 095, 096, 097, 098, 099, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126.
1994 - 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, [ 146], 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162,163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178.
1995 - 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230.
1996 - 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254.
Note — Jack Beven also compiled the Mariners Weather Logs Hurricane Alley for a while, as a result some of the Mariner Weather Logs Hurricane Alley which were more detailed.
General Information, Journals, and Tropical Discussions »

Northern HemisphereEdit

Images »
News and General Archives »
  • Dartmouth Flood Observatory – Data on worldwide flood events dating back to 1985
  • EM-DAT Disaster List – Contains damage and fatality data on numerous disasters worldwide
  • Google News – Contains large repository of news links and scanned newspaper articles
  • Newspapers.com – Contains large repository of scanned newspaper articles. Check WP:TWL for access.
  • NewspaperArchive – Same as above, check WP:TWL for access.
  • Google Scholar – Searches for academic journals and publications
  • ReliefWeb – Reports and publications on disaster and relief operations worldwide, esp. United Nations reports
  • USAID - Worldwide Disaster History Report - Separated by Each Country (1900-1993)
North Atlantic »
Tropical Cyclone Reports and "Wallets"
1958·1959
1960·1961·1962·1963·1964·1965·1966·1967·1968·1969
1970·1971·1972·1973·1974·1975·1976·1977·1978·1979
1980·1981·1982·1983·1984·1985·1986·1987·1988·1989
1990·1991·1992·1993·1994·1995
Tropical cyclone reports after 1995 can be found at the previously provided archive link.
Canada
Caribbean Islands
Mexico
Bermuda
United States
The Deadliest, Costliest, and Most Intense United States Tropical Cyclones
Original link: 1978, 1983, 1990, 1996 2000, 2004, 2007, 2011
Archived link: 1978, 1983, 1990, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2007, 2011
The Deadliest Atlantic Tropical Cyclones, 1492-1994
Elsewhere
Miscellany »
Mausam 1971 - Present »
RSMC New Delhi: Reports on cyclonic disturbances over the North Indian Ocean »

Southern HemisphereEdit

Western Australia Tropical Cyclone Season Summary
The Australian and South Pacific Cyclone Season Summary from the Australian Meteorological Magazine
RSMC Nadi Tropical Cyclone Seasonal Summary
Fiji NDMO Disaster reports
Original links: Ami 2003, Cliff/TD F,
Pacific Disaster.net: Ami, Cliff/TD F, Daman, Gene, Mick, Tomas
Fiji Islands (Monthly/Annual) Climate Summaries
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
1998 IA
1999 O
2002 WC
2003 WA, WC WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA
2004 WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA
2005 WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA, WC WA WA
2006 WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA, WC WA
2007 WA WA WA WA, WC WA FJ, WA FJ, WA FJ, WA FJ, WA FJ WA FJ, WA, WC FJ, WA, WC
2008 FJ, WA, WC FJ, WC FJ, WC FJ, WC FJ, WC FJ FJ FJ FJ FJ FJ FJ, WC
2009 FJ, WC FJ, WC FJ FJ FJ WC
2010 WC WC WC WC
2011 WC WC
2012 WC WC WC WC WC WC WC IA WC WC
2013 WC, PDN WC WC WC WC WC WC WC, IA WC WC WC
2014 WC WC WC WC WC IA WC, IA WC
2015 WC WC WC WC WC WC, IA WC WC WC WC WC WC
2016 WC, IA WC WC WC WC, IA WC WC WC WC WC WC
2017 WC, IA WC WC WC IA IA WC WC
2018 WC WC WC WC WC WC WC WC WC WC WC WC
2019 WC, IA WC, IA IA IA IA IA IA IA IA IA IA IA
2020

Sourcing guidelinesEdit

The core content policies on Wikipedia (neutral point of view, no original research, and verifiability) all apply to articles tagged by WikiProject Tropical cyclones. The project's style guidelines also provide information on how to cite sources effectively.

Relevant guidelines discussing the WikiProject's tropical meteorology articles may also be found at WP:SCICITE and WP:SCIRS.

Meteorological dataEdit

Reports, bulletins, and other products issued by Regional Specialized Meteorological Centers are the authoritative source on meteorological information pertaining to tropical cyclones in their respective basins. This includes both quantitative and qualitative information about a storm's characteristics, including intensities, durations, and locations. The most recent post-storm assessments take precedence over operational data. Thus, post-season revisions to a storm's "best track" file,[1] new information presented in a tropical cyclone report, or official database adjustments made by the Atlantic hurricane reanalysis project, or other official reanalyses supersede operational information where they disagree. Data in operational RSMC products can still be used if later data does not dispute them.

Information from other public agencies can also be used, but generally require in-text attribution. While the original best track data from meteorological agencies is a reliable source and can be referenced, readers often find difficulty interpreting them. Consider using IBTrACS, a more easily understandable track database, which is endorsed by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), for this information. Because the Automated Tropical Cyclone Forecasting System (ATCF) used by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center and National Hurricane Center is liable to change frequently in realtime, they should not be used for currently active storms. Forecasts from these agencies and RSMCs should only be used to cite the forecasts themselves; in other words, they can only be used to describe what was expected to occur, and never to describe what did occur.

Maps and other graphics published by meteorological agencies may be used to describe events (see the associated essay). However, they should only be referenced if they are explicit in conveying the supported information and do not require any rigorous meteorological interpretation (such as satellite analysis or drawing conclusions over what the arrangement of meteorological features represents).

For storms where the above are not applicable (in the case of storms before the advent of meteorological agencies), follow the reliable sourcing and due weight guidelines.

In general, self-published sources should not be used as sources for present or historical storm intensities. However, information contained in articles from reliable sources or commentary from established tropical cyclone experts can be used as sources for information not covered by WMO-endorsed agencies.[2] If such sources dispute WMO-endorsed meteorological data, commentary on the disputed information may be used, making sure to attribute claims and giving due weight.

Information on storm effectsEdit

Storm effects are typically referenced with a wide array of published sources. These may include news organizations, risk assessment organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGO), government agencies, and impact databases. So long as they are reliable sources, they can be used as references for tropical cyclone impacts.

Note that figures from early impact reports, often disseminated by the first NGO situation reports and news reports, may quickly be outdated in light of newer information. When sourcing damage totals or casualty figures, use the most recent value from a reliable source, as these values tend to be more stable and use more up-to-date information. If such figures are disputed by other reliable sources, this should be noted in the article, making sure to attribute claims and giving due weight. Routine calculations of damage and casualty figures (for instance, adding casualties from different countries) are acceptable as long as they arise from reliable sources.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ An RSMC "best track" is a smoothed reconstruction of a storm's track and intensity, often generated during a storm's lifetime and corrected/adjusted after the season.
  2. ^ Tropical cyclone experts whose commentary have been used for tropical cyclone articles historically include the works of Gary Padgett and Jeff Masters, whose commentary have been used in peer-reviewed journals.