Waterloo (electoral district)

Waterloo is the name of a federal electoral district in the Waterloo Region of Ontario, Canada, that has been used in the House of Commons of Canada from since 1968 (from 1973 to 1976, it was known as Waterloo—Cambridge). Between 1997 and 2015, the riding was known as Kitchener—Waterloo.[2]

Waterloo
Ontario electoral district
Waterloo - Canadian Federal Electoral District.png
Waterloo in relation to southern Ontario ridings (2013 boundaries)
Coordinates:43°29′N 80°31′W / 43.48°N 80.52°W / 43.48; -80.52Coordinates: 43°29′N 80°31′W / 43.48°N 80.52°W / 43.48; -80.52
Federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Bardish Chagger
Liberal
District created1966
First contested1968
Last contested2019
District webpageprofile, map
Demographics
Population (2016)[1]110,134
Electors (2015)77,312
Area (km²)[1]78
Pop. density (per km²)1,412
Census divisionsWaterloo
Census subdivisionsWaterloo, Kitchener

GeographyEdit

The Waterloo electoral district contains all of the city of Waterloo plus the Bridgeport neighbourhood of Kitchener.

HistoryEdit

1966–1973Edit

The Waterloo electoral district was created in 1966 from parts of Waterloo North and Waterloo South electoral districts. It initially comprised large sections of the Waterloo County (later Region) outside of the City of Kitchener, in particular in included, the City of Galt (now part of Cambridge), the City of Waterloo and the Townships of North Dumfries and Waterloo.[3]

1973–1976Edit

After the amalgamation of the City of Galt with the Towns of Preston and Hespeler into the City of Cambridge in 1973, the name of the electoral district was changed to Waterloo—Cambridge. The boundaries of the district were not changed to actually add the Preston and Hespeler asections of Cambridge into the riding.[4]

1976–1996Edit

In 1976, Waterloo—Cambridge was abolished when it was redistributed among Cambridge, Kitchener, and a new Waterloo electoral district.

The new Waterloo electoral district was created from parts of the Kitchener, Perth—Wilmot, Waterloo—Cambridge, and Wellington—Grey—Dufferin—Waterloo electoral districts. It comprised the Townships of Wellesley, Wilmot and Woolwich, the City of Waterloo, and parts of the City of Kitchener.[5]

In 1987, the Waterloo electoral district was redefined to comprise the City of Waterloo, the northern part of the City of Kitchener, and the Township of Woolwich. The Townships of Wellesley and Wilmot were redistributed to the Perth—Wellington—Waterloo district.[6]

The Waterloo electoral district was renamed to Kitchener—Waterloo[7] and part of it was split into Waterloo—Wellington.[8] The new district consisted initially of the City of Waterloo and the part of the City of Kitchener lying north of a line drawn from west to east along Highland Road West, Lawrence Avenue and Victoria Street.

1997-presentEdit

In 2003, the Kitchener part of the riding was redefined to be the part of the city lying north of a line drawn from west to east along Highland Road West, Fischer Hallman Road and the Canadian National Railway situated north of Shadeland Crescent.[7]

Following the 2011 Census and a Canadian Parliament decision to increase the number of Federal electoral districts from 308 to 338, Elections Canada conducted a redistribution process that began with the establishment of Electoral Boundaries Commissions for each province in 2012. As a result of the work of the Electoral Boundaries Commission for the Province of Ontario, which was concluded in July 2013, a revived Waterloo was created out of 80% of the old Kitchener—Waterloo. The rest of the Kitchener-Waterloo riding was split between Kitchener Centre and Kitchener-Conestoga[2][9] The revived riding comprised virtually all of the western portion of the old Kitchener—Waterloo, including all of Waterloo and a sliver of Kitchener lying north of the Canadian National Railway and northeast of Conestoga Parkway.

Members of ParliamentEdit

This riding has elected the following members of the House of Commons of Canada:

Parliament Years Member Party
Waterloo
Riding created from Waterloo North and Waterloo South
28th  1968–1972     Max Saltsman New Democratic
29th  1972–1974
Waterloo—Cambridge
30th  1974–1979     Max Saltsman New Democratic
Waterloo
31st  1979–1980     Walter McLean Progressive Conservative
32nd  1980–1984
33rd  1984–1988
34th  1988–1993
35th  1993–1997     Andrew Telegdi Liberal
Kitchener—Waterloo
36th  1997–2000     Andrew Telegdi Liberal
37th  2000–2004
38th  2004–2006
39th  2006–2008
40th  2008–2011     Peter Braid Conservative
41st  2011–2015
Waterloo
42nd  2015–2019     Bardish Chagger Liberal
43rd  2019–present

Electoral historyEdit

Graph of election results in Waterloo (minor parties that never got 2% of the vote or didn't run consistently are omitted)

Waterloo, 2015–presentEdit

2019 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Bardish Chagger 31,085 48.8 -0.9
Conservative Jerry Zhang 15,615 24.5 -7.8
New Democratic Lori Campbell 9,710 15.2 +0.3
Green Kirsten Wright 6,184 9.7 +6.8
People's Erika Traub 1,112 1.7
Total valid votes/Expense limit 63,706 100.0   112,180.38
Total rejected ballots 417 0.65 +0.33
Turnout 64,123 74.76 -2.9
Eligible voters 85,761
Source: Elections Canada[10], Global News[11]
2015 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Bardish Chagger 29,752 49.7 +11.38 $140,131.74
Conservative Peter Braid 19,318 32.3 -9.08 $148,370.13
New Democratic Diane Freeman 8,928 14.9 -0.04 $96,964.67
Green Richard Walsh 1,713 2.9 -1.78
Animal Alliance Emma Hawley-Yan 138 0.2 $4,066.17
Total valid votes/Expense limit 59,849 100.0   $212,120.63
Total rejected ballots 198 0.32
Turnout 60,047 77.66
Eligible voters 77,312
Source: Elections Canada[12][13]
2011 federal election redistributed results[14]
Party Vote %
  Conservative 22,193 41.38
  Liberal 20,551 38.32
  New Democratic 8,014 14.94
  Green 2,508 4.68
  Others 366 0.68

Kitchener—Waterloo, 1997-2011Edit

2011 Canadian federal election: Kitchener—Waterloo
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Peter Braid 27,039 40.85 +4.79 $90,641.15
Liberal Andrew Telegdi 24,895 37.62 +1.59
New Democratic Bill Brown 10,606 16.03 +1.31 $21,334.44
Green Cathy MacLellan 3,158 4.77 -7.33
Pirate Steven Bradley Scott 245 0.37
Independent Richard Walsh-Bowers 174 0.26
Marxist–Leninist Julian Ichim 66 0.10 none listed
Total valid votes 66,183 100.00
Total rejected ballots 216 0.33 -0.05
Turnout 66,399 70.17 +7.86
Eligible voters 94,624
2008 Canadian federal election: Kitchener—Waterloo
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Peter Braid 21,830 36.06 +7.75 $93,455
Liberal Andrew Telegdi 21,813 36.03 -10.82 $71,443
New Democratic Cindy Jacobsen 8,915 14.72 -3.16 $34,713
Green Cathy MacLellan 7,326 12.10 +5.64 $19,781
Libertarian Jason Cousineau 333 0.55 $0
Independent Mark Corbiere 107 0.17
Communist Ramon Portillo 105 0.17 $373
Canadian Action Kyle Huntingdon 105 0.17 $203
Total valid votes/Expense limit 60,534 100.00 $95,412
Total rejected ballots 229 0.38
Turnout 60,763 62.31 -8.08
2006 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Andrew Telegdi 31,136 46.85 -1.2
Conservative Ajmer Mandur 18,817 28.31 -1.1
New Democratic Edwin Laryea 11,889 17.88 +1.9
Green Pauline Richards 4,298 6.46 +0.9
Independent Ciprian Mihalcea 173 0.26 -0.4
Marxist–Leninist Julian Ichim 144 0.21
Total valid votes 66,457 100.0
Total rejected ballots 240 0.38
Turnout 66,697 70.39
2004 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Andrew Telegdi 28,015 48.1 -2.2
Conservative Steve Strauss 17,155 29.5 -9.5
New Democratic Edwin Laryea 9,267 15.9 +7.8
Green Pauline Richards 3,277 5.6 +4.1
Christian Heritage Frank Ellis 379 0.7
Independent Ciprian Mihalcea 124 0.2
Total valid votes 58,217 100.0

Note: Conservative vote is compared to the total of the Canadian Alliance vote and Progressive Conservative vote in 2000 election.

2000 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Andrew Telegdi 27,130 50.3 +2.6
Alliance Joshua Doig 12,406 23.0 +3.1
Progressive Conservative Brian Bourke 8,601 16.0 -6.1
New Democratic Richard Walsh-Bowers 4,397 8.2 -0.8
Green Jack MacAulay 809 1.5
Canadian Action Robert E. Cormier 273 0.5 0.0
Marxist–Leninist Christine Nugent 164 0.3 0.0
Independent Frank Ellis 105 0.2
Total valid votes 53,885 100.0
1997 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal Andrew Telegdi 25,111 47.7
Progressive Conservative Lynne Woolstencroft 11,613 22.1
Reform Mike Connolly 10,502 20.0
New Democratic Ted Martin 4,725 9.0
Independent Steve King 265 0.5
Canadian Action Monte Dennis 260 0.5
Marxist–Leninist Helmut Braun 153 0.3
Total valid votes 52,629 100.0

Waterloo, 1976–1996Edit

1993 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Andrew Telegdi 25,689 42.06 +5.71
Reform Mike Connolly 15,549 25.46
Progressive Conservative Lynne Woolstencroft 14,882 24.37 –20.74
New Democratic Scott Piatkowski 2,779 4.55 –12.89
Christian Heritage Ted Kryn 920 1.51
Libertarian Rita Huschka-Sprague 473 0.77 –0.34
Natural Law Blaine P. Watson 456 0.75
Independent Don Philip Faithful 329 0.54
Total valid votes 61,077 100.00  
Liberal gain from Progressive Conservative Swing –9.88


1988 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Walter McLean 26,949 45.11 –11.24
Liberal Steve Woodworth 21,715 36.35 +11.78
New Democratic Scott Piatkowski 10,418 17.44 –0.71
Libertarian Rita Huschka-Sprague 663 1.11 +0.18
Total valid votes 59,745 100.0  
Progressive Conservative hold Swing –11.51


1984 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Walter McLean 31,898 56.35 +16.36
Liberal Lynn Myers 13,911 24.57 –15.13
New Democratic Bob Needham 10,275 18.15 –0.91
Libertarian Layne E. Kulchecki 525 0.93 +0.49
Total valid votes 56,609 100.0  
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +15.74


1980 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Walter McLean 20,609 39.99 –6.07
Liberal Frank Epp 20,455 39.70 +4.59
New Democratic Bob Needham 9,819 19.06 +0.94
Rhinoceros Rick Nigol 330 0.64
Libertarian Colin McLorg 229 0.44 –0.03
Marxist–Leninist Brian Erdman 87 0.17 –0.07
Total valid votes 51,529 100.0  
Progressive Conservative hold Swing –5.33


1979 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Walter McLean 23,837 46.06 +17.68
Liberal Frank Epp 18,172 35.11 +5.68
New Democratic Mike Makarchuk 9,375 18.12 –23.46
Libertarian Bonne Willy Posma 241 0.47
Marxist–Leninist Brian Erdman 125 0.24 +0.04
Total valid votes 51,750 100.0  
Progressive Conservative gain from New Democratic Swing +6.00


Waterloo—Cambridge, 1973–1976Edit

1974 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
New Democratic Max Saltsman 25,479 41.58 +1.10
Liberal Brian Goff 18,034 29.43 +3.39
Progressive Conservative Glenn Carroll 17,394 28.38 –4.77
Social Credit John H. Long 253 0.41 +0.17
Marxist–Leninist Richard E. Rathwell 122 0.20
Total valid votes 61,282 100.0  
New Democratic hold Swing –1.14


Waterloo, 1966–1973Edit

1972 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
New Democratic Max Saltsman 24,197 40.48 +6.48
Progressive Conservative Glenn E. Carroll 19,817 33.15 +0.63
Liberal Lou Breithaupt 15,570 26.04 –7.07
Social Credit Régent G. Gervais 143 0.24 –0.13
No affiliation Jules W.P. Grajower 55 0.09
Total valid votes 59,782 100.0  
New Democratic hold Swing +2.92


1968 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes %
New Democratic Max Saltsman 15,231 34.00
Liberal Herbert Epp 14,835 33.11
Progressive Conservative Liam S. O'Brian 14,568 32.52
Social Credit Régent Gervais 167 0.37
Total valid votes 44,801 100.0  
This riding was created from parts of Waterloo North and Waterloo South, which elected a Liberal and a Progressive Conservative, respectively, in the last election.

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b Statistics Canada: 2016
  2. ^ a b Elections Canada. "Report of the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for the Province of Ontario". Retrieved 2014-09-17.
  3. ^ Parliament of Canada. "HISTORY OF FEDERAL RIDINGS SINCE 1867 - WATERLOO, Ontario (1968 - 1973)". Retrieved 2014-09-17.
  4. ^ Parliament of Canada. "HISTORY OF FEDERAL RIDINGS SINCE 1867 - WATERLOO--CAMBRIDGE, Ontario (1973 - 1976)". Retrieved 2014-09-17.
  5. ^ Parliament of Canada. "HISTORY OF FEDERAL RIDINGS SINCE 1867 - WATERLOO, Ontario (1976 - 1996)". Retrieved 2014-09-17.
  6. ^ Parliament of Canada. "HISTORY OF FEDERAL RIDINGS SINCE 1867 - PERTH--WELLINGTON--WATERLOO, Ontario (1987 - 1996)". Retrieved 2014-09-17.
  7. ^ a b Parliament of Canada. "HISTORY OF FEDERAL RIDINGS SINCE 1867 - KITCHENER--WATERLOO, Ontario (1996 - )". Retrieved 2014-09-17.
  8. ^ Parliament of Canada. "HISTORY OF FEDERAL RIDINGS SINCE 1867 - WATERLOO--WELLINGTON, Ontario (1996 - 2003)". Retrieved 2014-09-17.
  9. ^ Elections Canada. "Report of the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for the Province of Ontario". Retrieved 2013-07-31.
  10. ^ "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  11. ^ "Canada election results: Waterloo". GlobalNews. Retrieved 26 October 2019.
  12. ^ Elections Canada – Confirmed candidates for Waterloo, 30 September 2015
  13. ^ Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates
  14. ^ Pundits' Guide to Canadian Elections

External linksEdit