Wale Ogunyemi

Chief Wale Ogunyemi, OFR (12 August 1939–December 2001) was a Nigerian veteran seasoned dramatist, film actor, prolific playwright and Yoruba language scholar[2]

Wale Ogunyemi
Born12 August 1939
DiedDecember 2001
NationalityNigerian
CitizenshipNigerian
Occupationplaywright
Years active1963–present
Known for
The Lion and the Jewel
Kongi's Harvest
Sango
Langbodo[1]

Early lifeEdit

He was born on August 12, 1939 at Igbajo, a city in Osun State, southwestern Nigeria to Samuel Adeosun and Mary Ogunyemi .[3] He attended the University of Ibadan in 1967 for a year course in drama, the same year he was appointed as a research assistant at Ibadan Institute of African Studies where he later retired.[4][5][6]

CareerEdit

He began his acting career as a seasonal actor with the new western Nigerian television service in the early 1960s.[7] He later worked with professor Wole Soyinka, a Nobel Laureate and became a foundation member of Soyinka Orisun Theatre.[8] His credible performance made him a choice for the role he played as "The bale" in The Lion and the Jewel[9] and Dende in Kongi's Harvest by professor Wole Soyinka.[10] He also featured in The Beatification Of Area Boy, a play by Wole Soyinka premiered at the West Yorkshire Playhouse in 1995.[11] He had written and co-scripted several drama before his death in December 2001.[12][13]

FilmographyEdit

AwardsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Set to battle demons on mount Langbodo". The Punch - Nigeria's Most Widely Read Newspaper. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  2. ^ Lindfors, Bernth (2003). Black African Literature in English, 1997-1999. google.nl. ISBN 9780852555750. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  3. ^ Boscolo, Cristina (2009). Ọdún. ISBN 978-9042026803. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  4. ^ Gérard, Albert S. (1986). European-language Writing in Sub-Saharan Africa. google.nl. ISBN 9630538326. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  5. ^ George, Olakunle (February 2012). Relocating Agency. google.nl. ISBN 9780791487761. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  6. ^ Owomoyela, Oyekan (21 October 2008). The Columbia Guide to West African Literature in English Since 1945. google.nl. ISBN 9780231512152. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  7. ^ Osofisan, Femi (2001). The Nostalgic Drum. google.nl. ISBN 9780865438064. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  8. ^ "WHY WALE OGUNYEMI STILL LIVES ON NIGERIA'S STAGE-DIRECTOR OF LANGBODO". thenigerianvoice.com. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  9. ^ Meyer-Dinkgrafe, Daniel (20 May 2003). Who's Who in Contemporary World Theatre. google.nl. ISBN 9781134767861. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  10. ^ Jones, Eldred D.; Jones, Marjorie; Gikandi, Simon; Gibbs, James Morel (1998). Childhood in African Literature. google.nl. ISBN 9780865436732. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  11. ^ "Obituary: Wale Ogunyemi". The Guardian. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  12. ^ Deandrea, Pietro (2002). Fertile Crossings. ISBN 9042014784. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  13. ^ Killam, G. D.; Kerfoot, Alicia L. (2008). Student Encyclopedia of African Literature. google.nl. ISBN 9780313335808. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  14. ^ Jeyifo, Biodun (13 November 2003). Wole Soyinka. google.com.ng. ISBN 9781139439084. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  15. ^ "Menacing Shadows Greet Dawn In Nigeria". nytimes.com. 11 October 1996. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  16. ^ Falola, Toyin; Genova, Ann (2005). Yoruba Creativity. ISBN 9781592213368. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  17. ^ Ogunyẹmi, Wale (1976). Kiriji. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  18. ^ Banham, Martin (7 March 1996). The Cambridge Paperback Guide to Theatre. ISBN 9780521446549. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  19. ^ Losambe, Lokangaka; Sarinjeive, Devi (2001). Pre-colonial and Post-colonial Drama and Theatre in Africa. google.nl. ISBN 9781919876061. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  20. ^ "Wale Ogunyemi, eminent playwright dies". World News. Retrieved 18 January 2015.