Vojislav Marinković

Vojislav Marinković (Serbian Cyrillic: Војислав Маринковић; 13 May 1876[1] – 18 September 1935)[2] was a Serbian and Yugoslav diplomat and politician, serving two times as Minister of Foreign Affairs and briefly as Prime Minister during the dictatorship of King Alexander I.

Vojislav Marinković
Vojislav Marinković.jpg
9th Prime Minister of Yugoslavia
In office
4 April 1932 – 3 July 1932
MonarchAlexander I
Preceded byPetar Živković
Succeeded byMilan Srškić
Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
17 April 1927 – 3 July 1932
Preceded byNinko Perić
Succeeded byBogoljub Jevtić
In office
27 July 1924 – 6 November 1924
Preceded byMomčilo Ninčić
Succeeded byMomčilo Ninčić
Minister of the Interior
In office
24 December 1921 – 24 June 1924
Preceded bySvetozar Pribićević
Succeeded byMilorad Vujičić
Minister of Economy
In office
1914–1917
Personal details
Born(1876-05-13)13 May 1876
Belgrade, Serbia
Died18 September 1935(1935-09-18) (aged 59)
Belgrade, Yugoslavia
NationalitySerbian
Political partyDemocratic Party
Yugoslav National Party
Spouse(s)Ana Lozanić
ParentsDimitrije Marinković
Velika Klajn
Alma materUniversity of Belgrade
ProfessionEconomist

BeginningsEdit

Marinković was born in Belgrade, then capital of the Principality of Serbia, in 1876. His parents were Dimitrije Marinković, lawyer and politician, and Velika (nee Klajn[3]). He attended secondary school in the city, graduated at the University of Belgrade Faculty of Law and later received doctorate in political science and economics in Paris.[1]

From 1901, he worked in the Ministry of Finance and was director of the Business Bank.[1] He was deputy of the Serbian Parliament from 1906.[1] From 1914 to 1917, he served as Minister of Economy.[1] Again minister at the end of 1918, he participated in the Paris Peace Conference, 1919.[1]

Parliamentary period in YugoslaviaEdit

He served as Minister of the Interior briefly at the end of 1921 and beginning of 1922.[1]

He served as Minister of Foreign Affairs in the governments of Ljubomir Davidović (for a few months of 1924), Velimir Vukićević and Anton Korošec, last in the parliamentary term.[4][1]

Royal dictatorshipEdit

With the proclamation of the 6 January Dictatorship in 1929, Marinković entered the cabinet chaired by the former commander of the Royal Guard, General Petar Živković. [5] He replaced Živković as Prime Minister in April 1932, with the aim of changing the image of the dictatorship thanks to his experience as a veteran deputy and distinguished member of the Democratic Party.[6]

During his short tenure as the head of the government, he softened political repression, allowing contacts between the old parties.[7] His program, which was left unimplemented by his early dismissal, included the liberalization of the electoral law passed in 1931 and the revision of the 1931 Constitution, approved during the dictatorship.[8] He publicly mentioned the possibility of calling a referendum on the federalization of the country, which upset both some of his ministers and the King, who relieved him in July 1932.[9] He was succeeded as Prime Minister by his former Minister of the Interior, Milan Srškić, opposed to the rapid liberalization advocated by Marinković.[10]

Personal lifeEdit

He was married to Ana (1881–1973), painter and daughter of chemist Sima Lozanić. They had no children.[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Ministry, p. 1
  2. ^ Yugoslav Archive (2008), p. 1
  3. ^ Знаменити Јевреји Србије – биографски лексикон (in Serbian)
  4. ^ Pavlović 1971, p. 82
  5. ^ Pavlović 1971, p. 82
  6. ^ Pavlović 1971, p. 82
  7. ^ Pavlović 1971, p. 82
  8. ^ Pavlović 1971, p. 83
  9. ^ Pavlović 1971, p. 83
  10. ^ Pavlović 1971, p. 83
  11. ^ Snežana Bojović: Sima Lozanić 1847–1935, Princip, Beograd 1996, ISBN 9993562300

BibliographyEdit

Political offices
Preceded by
Petar Živković
Prime Minister of Yugoslavia
1932
Succeeded by
Milan Srškić
Preceded by
Velizar S. Janković
Minister of Economy
1914–1917
Succeeded by
Velizar S. Janković
Preceded by
Momčilo Ninčić
Minister of Internal Affairs
1921–1924
Succeeded by
Momčilo Ninčić
Preceded by
Momčilo Ninčić
Minister of Foreign Affairs
1924
Succeeded by
Momčilo Ninčić
Preceded by
Ninko Perić
Minister of Foreign Affairs
1927–1932
Succeeded by
Bogoljub Jevtić