Veterans' Employment and Training Service

The United States Office of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (OASVET) was established by Secretary's Order No. 5-81 in December 1981.[1]

Veterans' Employment and Training Service
USDOL VETS.jpg
Agency overview
FormedDecember 1981
JurisdictionFederal government of the United States
HeadquartersWashington, D.C.
Employees233 (180 field staff, 53 headquarters)
Agency executive
  • James Rodriguez, Assistant Secretary
Websitewww.dol.gov/agencies/vets

The assistant secretary position was created by P.L. 96-466 in October 1980, to replace the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment position created by P.L. 94-502 in October 1976. The bipartisan Congressional intent was to establish leadership of the department's programs for services to veterans at the policy-making level, and thereby help to ensure Congressional mandates for an effective:

  • Job and job training counseling service program,
  • Employment placement service program, and
  • Job training placement service program for eligible veterans (carried out by the United States Department of Labor).

On July 16, 2021, President Joe Biden nominated James Rodriguez, the acting agency head and assistant secretary's principal deputy, for the position of Assistant Secretary for VET; he was confirmed by the Senate and sworn into office in May 2022.[2]

Corruption scandalEdit

On 22 July 2011, the then assistant secretary, Ray Jefferson, was led out of the Frances Perkins Building by the FBI and subsequently resigned on July 25, 2011, following a contracting scandal.[3][4][5][6]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "VETS | U.S. Department of Labor".
  2. ^ Sheehey, Maeve (July 16, 2021). "Former Sen. Tom Udall is Biden's pick as ambassador to New Zealand and Samoa". POLITICO. Retrieved July 17, 2021.
  3. ^ Matt Bewig and Noel Brinkerhoff (30 July 2011). "Labor Official Resigns Following Corruption Investigation: Who is Raymond Jefferson?". allgov.com. Retrieved 17 October 2011.
  4. ^ "Labor Official Resigns Following Corruption Investigation". Kansas City Star. 30 July 2011. Retrieved 17 October 2011.
  5. ^ Steve Vogel (28 July 2011). "Raymond Jefferson leaves Labor Department after ethics finding". Washington Post. Retrieved 17 October 2011.
  6. ^ BILL LAMBRECHT (28 July 2011). "McCaskill criticizes Labor Department contracting 'boondoggle'". St Louis Today. Retrieved 17 October 2011.

External linksEdit